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Enayla
06-28-2005, 10:05 AM
, in Adobe Photoshop.

I've not worked enough in Painter to know how to repeat this process there, so I can't help you in that regard :) I do get a lot of inquiries on how I blend my colours, and these are some of the ways. I had a while to spare so I threw this together, hoping it might be some help to some of you, or at least a slightly interesting read. It's not in-depth like the face-feature tutorials by any means.

http://www.furiae.com/images/blending-thoughts.jpg

(I know that blending smoothly isn't necessarily what everyone wants to achieve, nor is it the best way to blend. I just thought I'd share.)

Nazirull
06-28-2005, 10:08 AM
Bless u Linda...Bless u.....cant praise u enuff for sharing.......:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:
A worthy champion

Maidith
06-28-2005, 10:13 AM
Very interesting! Thank you for sharing :)

Art2
06-28-2005, 10:27 AM
Linda, thanks for sharing!

Blending method 2 is what I use in Painter, using the RoundCamelHair brush.

sergioKomic
06-28-2005, 10:33 AM
Thank you!

Devotion
06-28-2005, 12:02 PM
Very quick, well done tutorial. Thanks a bunch- you know we appreciate it. ;)

Elaeria
06-28-2005, 02:46 PM
Hey all! Linda, your tutorials are always informative AND elegant. I'm so impressed!:thumbsup: I only have a couple of questions...

Okay, at the risk of totally embarassing myself and exposing my newbieness to Photoshop...*cringes* in the first two examples that you have here, you are working using a selected brush and the desired colours, right? There is no involvement of the smudge tool at all?

I only ask because at first I assumed you were using the smudge tool. I think I misunderstood. Are they more a technique of varying degrees of brush pressure and colour opacity?
I have been blending using the smudge tool because I couldn't find another way to combine colours to create a smooth surface. (Be gentle, I'm teaching myself Photoshop over here..ha ha!) I have experienced difficulty in getting the desired surface and now I'm thinking that I've been doing it all wrong...*sighs* :)

Can you clarify for me?
Thanks and congrats on your award! Very much deserved and how fitting it should come to you after your computer crashes!! Ha ha! :D
Take care,
~Ela~

nineinchneil
06-28-2005, 02:53 PM
damn, even the way you designed the layout is awesome. you rock.

LoTekK
06-28-2005, 03:34 PM
Elaeria:
I don't know what I'm thinking, posting a followup to Linda's lovely notes, but here goes:
http://www.lotekk.com/files/blending.gif

Before I clean forget. Linda, that's a lovely set of notes you've put together. Nice choice of colors, too. Very soothing. :)

Ego
06-28-2005, 03:35 PM
Just reading the second paragraph alone shows me I've been doing it very wrong.
Thanks a bunch Linda.

offbeatworlds
06-28-2005, 03:42 PM
Ahh...I see now. Usually what I do is I blend with the hard edged brush for a while, then take the smudge tool, then paint with the hard edged brush some more, then go over with the soft edged brush. But I have really been wondering how to do it with the spackled brush. This was very informative, thank you Linda!

jmBoekestein
06-28-2005, 04:18 PM
This is interesting, I never did digital painting before and I went into using painters wettish brushes for blending. I ' mix on canvas ' but don't get the desired result fast enough.

Basically I'd ask about the entire workflow. For instance when and where to stop adding the basic hard edged colours and then what to go for when blending, and what kind of detail will need to be put in right away and what can be added later.

I'm pretty sure it's possible to add later on, but for the best result a lot might need to be predetermined?

thx again for helping us out on these issues. :D

Ego
06-28-2005, 04:45 PM
Beh', where is this spackled brush? Can't seem to find it. :(

LoTekK
06-28-2005, 05:03 PM
Queensoul:
That brush in the notes looks like a simple custom brush she put together. You can either create one like that, or you can use one of the "spatter" brushes in Photoshop's default brushset:
http://www.lotekk.com/files/spackle.png

jmBoekestein
06-28-2005, 05:06 PM
Make one :D, it isn't very difficult really. ANd if you've got a newer version of photoshop I bet you might be able to get it working in 16 bit greyscale. urhm... >>:deal: (http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=239810)<<, ofcourse...:rolleyes:...same genious behind it. :)

Elaeria
06-28-2005, 05:11 PM
LOL! JanMark...I swear you should be selling software for Adobe. Always pushing the latest versions!! :twisted:

Thanks LoTeKK for the help...my hands are just ITCHING to get home from work to my poor lonesome tablet so I can practice this..*cries*

~Ela~

Nazirull
06-28-2005, 05:11 PM
From what my ever-numbed brain can compute....its about 4 different methods of blending colors....I was trying out with the first one but it wasnt that smooth.

But it took a rather suprising twist...I found out (finally) colors! I think the initial process of choosing colors essential, as Enayla puts it so many times through her widespread tutorials.
You can have a great shade...but if the combination of colors is bad..then everything is gonna be bad.

Looks like Linda has always used the skintones as a practive .Its intriguing to find how Lilac and Terracota colors can give vibrancy.

and there are two tones for shadow

I wanna try the other 3 strokes.....but I gotta sleep....

http://img232.echo.cx/img232/5389/color65ad.jpg (http://www.imageshack.us)

fabianv
06-28-2005, 05:22 PM
Thank you for sharing this Linda; you are a great asset to this community :) Its great that the community was able to give back to you with that marvelous award you received for your painting in the Master & Servant competition. Your tutorials really are inspiring.

Ego
06-28-2005, 05:24 PM
LoTekk, thanks, I see the spatter brushes now :D

fabianv
06-28-2005, 05:29 PM
Enayla.. I feel like im doing something wrong with my color blending.. here is something I drew yesterday but due to the way I did the colors Its messed up.. how would you approach this? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v16/fabianv/face-fab.jpg

LoTekK
06-28-2005, 05:53 PM
Fabianv:
It looks like you've got the blending technique down pat, but you're painting is lacking saturation. The animated gif I put up demonstrates the point Linda made in her notes about letting your brushes make all the blending choices for you. You'll notice that at step 3, the gradient area has lost all sense of saturation, so it's looking very dull. Adding that awfully hot pink to the transition area makes the formerly dull transition look a lot more vibrant. Granted, the color choice was very exaggerated, but the point stands.

In the case of your painting, the shadow areas, in particular, are very desaturated and, hence, muddy-looking. You also have a fairly low range of values. Try pushing the lights and darks more, and adding some saturation back into the picture.

nebezial
06-28-2005, 07:25 PM
excellent tut enayla. great approach. still i must say people. explore the photoshop. edited.

LoTekK
06-28-2005, 07:33 PM
Speaking of alternative blending methods, Don Seegmiller (http://www.seegmillerart.com)'s Digital Character Design & Painting book (Photoshop CS edition) discusses using the Healing Brush to blend between colors. Pretty interesting method, too.

nebezial
06-28-2005, 07:37 PM
wow... so thats what that thing is for, thanx for the link... i was always confused bout that healing brush thing:thumbsup:

Ego
06-28-2005, 07:48 PM
wow... so thats what that thing is for, thanx for the link... i was always confused bout that healing brush thing:thumbsup:
Yeah, thank god for those that share their knowledge :)

jmBoekestein
06-28-2005, 07:52 PM
my guess, he lasso's and then paiants into the selections using different source colours for the different lights in the scene. The overall shapes are well defined, but heavy smudging makes it interesting in the transitional areas.

nebezial
06-28-2005, 07:54 PM
my guess, he lasso's and then paiants into the selections using different source colours for the different lights in the scene. The overall shapes are well defined, but heavy smudging makes it interesting in the transitional areas.
who does that???

jmBoekestein
06-28-2005, 07:58 PM
:curious:, dunno...:wise:...you tell me?

nebezial
06-28-2005, 08:01 PM
ME??? ...i would rather die than complicate things to that level, think about it, it is a huge comic book im makin... every picture done that way...shivers... ten years later first edition done... gasp

Ego
06-28-2005, 08:03 PM
ME??? ...i would rather die than complicate things to that level, think about it, it is a huge comic book im makin... every picture done that way...shivers... ten years later first edition done... gasp
Well keep your secrets then. We are kind of enjoying those who are sharing theirs., really.

Rens
06-28-2005, 08:11 PM
Indeed, what's the point of your post nebezial? :shrug:

nebezial
06-28-2005, 08:15 PM
im sorry i usualy share all my stuff, i made tuts myself but this i just discovered, i need to work it out a lil, it is sort of a trick in the making, patience, i will make a tut

:)

nebezial
06-28-2005, 08:17 PM
the point is to make people look for options in the frickin program!!!

calisto-lynn
06-28-2005, 08:21 PM
aaah..this looks troublesome, neb.. what cha gonna do? reveal the secret to us yet?:bounce:

nebezial
06-28-2005, 08:25 PM
e tu brutus:) i said ill make a tut and i will.. u should know that:D im no good at keepin secrets, i just want to see will anyone figure it out, u know me, anyways this is enaylas thread so i wont be spammin it anymore, im sorry Enayla. so get back on the subject people, ill edit out the pic i posted

JARhead
06-28-2005, 08:34 PM
Linda, Ive said it once and Ill say it time after time, your the best! Always an insperation!

Thanks for the Tut! I've been guilty of using only a Hightlight and a shadow tone, well now I know, thanks agian!

character
06-28-2005, 09:50 PM
lol, i've been doing it wrong all along! i love it! thanks for sharing this. i never thought to use a speckled brush for blending. i only use those for hair. now i know, AND KNOWING IS HALF TE BATTLE!!! thank you Linda!

Lunatique
06-29-2005, 03:42 AM
In the d'artiste book, I have a tutorial that deals with blending and rendering brushstrokes.

If anyone's interested, I could do a Painter blending/rendering comparison to accompany what Linda has done with her Photoshop one.

Ego
06-29-2005, 04:48 AM
In the d'artiste book, I have a tutorial that deals with blending and rendering brushstrokes.

If anyone's interested, I could do a Painter blending/rendering comparison to accompany what Linda has done with her Photoshop one.

Yes please Robert :) That would be greatly appreciated.


If any of you use painter, please visit Robert's site for his custom brushes. They are just awesome.
http://www.ethereality.info/

Slybones
06-29-2005, 05:53 AM
Awesome thread. I really like the techniques you posted, Enalya. I made a real fast tutorial for the healing brush method of blending that someone mentioned earlier in the thread, in case anyone was wondering how to do it. I learned this at a tutorial hosted by Don Seegmiller. I'm going to plug his books, since it's his technique: Don Seegmiller's Books (http://www.seegmillerart.com/book.htm)

http://wharris.net/images/healing.jpg

I'm a newbie painter, so I can't really demonstrate how to use this technique effectively, but perhaps someone who is skilled can post their results to show how effective it is.

LoTekK
06-29-2005, 05:59 AM
The nice thing about the healing tool is that it's orders of magnitude more responsive than the smudge tool. In addition, you can define a nice background pattern that will be incorporated into the blending automagically. It does take a bit of practise to get used to this method, but it can net some nice results. I'll see if I can post up a quickie tutorial in the morning. For now, it's time to hit the sack. :)

Slybones
06-29-2005, 06:04 AM
In addition, you can define a nice background pattern that will be incorporated into the blending automagically.

Automagically... I don't know whether that was a typo, or on purpose. But, either way, I like it :thumbsup:

Enayla
06-29-2005, 06:30 AM
Ela -- I must admit to not being entirely sure what it is that you're asking for. In the first two examples, yes, all I'm doing is using the colours I've picked out and the brushes I've chosen. No smudge at all. You really don't need the smudge at all given opportunities. One of the reasons to why I prefer the spackled brush is that if you brush it in a clean line, the side of it will produce a nice, semi-sharp edge that looks very natural in shading.

I sometimes combine the smudge with the others but it's not necessary. It's just for when I desire one effect or the other. The risk with the smudge is that it's all too easy to ruin sharp or pronounced edges with it. The other methods are just a way of using the pressure sensitivity of the wacom pen to accomplish nice effects. You pick the colours from the palette at first and then increasingly from your own piece as the variations increase, and use less and less pressure (in other words, draw more and more lightly) as you progress. LoTekk gave a wonderful example two posts below yours :D

Jan-Mark -- I really don't know how to explain the work flow. I basically lay out the block-colours with sharp edges, or semi-sharp edges anyway, hard pressure and sloppy layering until it feels 'right'. Until I have the colours where I want them. Better to have all the colours in the right positions before trying to go into smoothing them out. A lot of people make the mistake of starting with the actual blending, I think. They'll not even have all the colours laid out and they'll start with the actual smooth-painting, trying to get the transitions to look right. A little like sewing the buttons on a dress and adding lace, before you've even finished cutting the pattern out.

The details you need to add pretty early on are really just the edges. In a face, for instance, the edges of the nose would stand out. On clothes, you will want to get the folds down before you start blending.

Queensoul -- I might have included it in my http://www.furiae.com/images/linda.abr that I've been sharing around for a while. Otherwise, just set the brush yourself in photoshop. I'll explain how to do it if you need the help.

Fabianv -- LoTekK gave a very nice response to this one. I'll add that you've made the basic mistake of assuming skin to be a little bit too simple in its colour lay-out. The shadow tone is just too close to the basic skin tone in colour. The highlights seem to be a slightly more desaturated version of the midtones. That's why picking the colours is SO important a thing to do before the rest is approached. The first thing you might try out is to go into the Color Balance setting... add some magenta to the shadows, some red to the midtones and cyan to the highlights. That spices it up a bit :) Then pick two accents to make the colours vibrate (like I used that purple and the terracotta). The blending is excellent, it's the colour choices that makes it seem a little washed out.


Oh, and -- the healing brush method looks, indeed, quite awesome. I'm not too sure I'd get comfortable with it, though. I like the smudge because I can so easily use it with any brush I like - and I have (or had, before the crash anyway, now I'm down to the bare basics of my brushes) several brushes I've created for the sole purpose of using with the smudge.

I'll try it out and see if I can't combine it with the methods I'm already using -- tons of thanks for pointing me in the direction.

(oh, and Rob: would LOVE to see that. I'll probably get into Painter more, myself, soon... would love to get tips like that.)

Lunatique
06-29-2005, 09:08 AM
(oh, and Rob: would LOVE to see that. I'll probably get into Painter more, myself, soon... would love to get tips like that.)

You definitely should. Painter changed the way I feel about digital painting. If you get stuck anytime, feel free to ask--especially that we have Jinny Brown in the Painter Forum, as she's incredibly knowledgeable about Painter, and is a very generous and kind soul.

Ok, I did a quick demo of what I love about Painter's brush engine. It is fundamentally different from Photoshop because it was designed for one thing only, and that is to draw and paint, whereas Photoshop was designed for image editing for photographers. I use both and can't live without either. I use Painter for painting, and Photoshop for editing and rough drafts. Of course, I could paint with only Photoshop, but I won't enjoy it as much.

Ok, this image is going to be big (1600x1200--the size of my desktop). I didn't want to resize it because I wanted you guys to be able to see the brushstrokes clearly, in its original resolution. I did compress the jpeg at 80% though.

http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/temp/painter-brushes.jpg

First of all, you'll notice that Painter really tries to capture the dynamics and subtleties of traditional art tools. The biggest difference (and the one that made me fall in love with it) is that there is wet-on-wet painting, which does not exist in Photoshop. Photoshop's brushes are essentially like different shaped stamps--with some dynamic control of how the stamps are applied. The problem with that is there's always that stamped shape you can't get rid of, unless you try to cover your tracks. Painter brushes are highly dynamic, and as you tilt your tablet pen, certain brushes will respond accordingly (for example, the palette knife will turn on it's sharp knife edge if you tilt the tablet pen). The wet-on-wet really makes it a joy to paint in Painter, because you no longer have to "mimic" brushstrokes in Photoshop, or blend them afterwards. In Painter, your brushstrokes will blend automatically with the colors already on the canvas, just like real paint. Also due to the dynamic brush engine. you can have effects that you cannot get in Photoshop (for example, look at the Coarse Oily Blender, Artist's Oils, Asian Brushes, Watercolor, Felt Pens, Palette Knife..etc). BTW, the only custom brush in that picture is the "Rob's Cover Pencil," which is a brush I designed to mimic real pencils. I don't like the ones that comes with Painter.

Some people might think all that random scribbling I did might not seem practical for actual finished paintings, so I included some examples of what Painter does for me in my paintings.

These are some close-ups of some of my paintings. I'm only showing cropped close-ups to demonstrate what Painter could do--you can see the entire paintings at my website.


http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/scythe_wolf/scythe_wolf-closeup3.jpg

http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/scythe_wolf/scythe_wolf-closeup2.jpg

http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/melancholic_princess/melancholic_princess_details-2.jpg
You can see how I used the bristled brushes to achieve the fur on the wolf, the frilly lining on the girl's dress, and the strands of hair. Those are single brushstrokes, and since the bristles are dynamic, I can tilt and paint in such a way that feels very different from Photoshop. The wet-on-wet means I really don't need to go back in with any kind of blending or smudging--it's done in the actual brushtrokes already.


http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/scythe_wolf/scythe_wolf-closeup7.jpg

http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/memories_of_hangzhou/memories_of_hangzhou-4.jpg

http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/memories_of_hangzhou/memories_of_hangzhou-7.jpg
And because Painter's brushes can do wet-on-wet, the brushstrokes can have that painterly quality to them, because as you lay down each stroke, it actually interacts with the colors already on the canvas by blending and smudging with them dynamically. You can also control how much blending you want in your brushes, or how much paint it should actually carry.


http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/mood1/d%27artiste_cover.jpg

http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/memories_of_hangzhou/memories_of_hangzhou-2.jpg
Some of you know that the Palette Knife brush is one of my favorites. You can do drastically different things with it. The first one, although is quite smooth, is pretty much all done with the palette knife. The second one, you can see that the pattern on the dress is all palette knife.


http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/new/elena_formal_portrait/closeup-2.jpg
I love the wet-on-wet quality of Painter's brushes. In Photoshop, you have to paint in a similar was as you would with gouache, but in Painter, you can have a lot more freedom in how you want to paint.

So, anyway, that's my contibution to this thread.

ashakarc
06-29-2005, 09:25 AM
Incredible work Lunatique, just incredible !!

jmBoekestein
06-29-2005, 11:02 AM
Linda
I always start the quick and easy way, one base colour and then start using a wet brush right away :rolleyes:, I actually like thta a lot in some occasions where large areas need quick gradiation, I use a bleeding brush to pick up underlying colours. Lots of fun anyway, but not for details indeed.


:)thx, you're very kind.

Going to have to look at that Lunatique!!! Looks really interesting :D.

fabianv
06-29-2005, 11:28 AM
Fabianv -- LoTekK gave a very nice response to this one. I'll add that you've made the basic mistake of assuming skin to be a little bit too simple in its colour lay-out. The shadow tone is just too close to the basic skin tone in colour. The highlights seem to be a slightly more desaturated version of the midtones. That's why picking the colours is SO important a thing to do before the rest is approached. The first thing you might try out is to go into the Color Balance setting... add some magenta to the shadows, some red to the midtones and cyan to the highlights. That spices it up a bit :) Then pick two accents to make the colours vibrate (like I used that purple and the terracotta). The blending is excellent, it's the colour choices that makes it seem a little washed out.




Im really honoured to get a reply from you.. and doubly honoured saying that The blending is excellent .. highly unexpected! Youve inspired me so much.. if only you knew how much. Thank you for you constructive criticism.

Youve been such a great inspiration to us all. Maybe you should start a thread about ''Execution of Concepts and Ideas''':thumbsup:

Keep up the amazing work ..!

Elaeria
06-29-2005, 01:04 PM
Linda - Thanks! I appreciate your answer to my question. It did help...even if you didn't completely understand my ramblings. :) *grin* You are right, LoTekk did answer my question yesterday in the post you indicated under mine and I understand now. *hugs to LoTekk and Linda* Thank you both for your help!

Ruining pronounced edges seems to be my specialty and I think it is because I only use the smudge tool when trying to blend. Now I have a few new techniques to try that may help with that problem.
I'll have to give this a go tonight. I was hoping to have tried last night, but my personal free time has been ripped from my hands quite a bit lately by work and other responsibilities so I'm hoping to sit down and try this tonight. Maybe I'll hide in the closet with my laptop and graphire so noone will find me! Ha ha! :twisted:

Robert - I remember seeing those paintings in my copy of D'artiste and on your website. I've stared at them for hours! :thumbsup: They are breathtaking and I love your style. Thanks for offering us a version of this tutorial for Painter. Very much looking forward to learning from you! :D

fabianv
06-29-2005, 01:36 PM
I am just inlove with the way you blend colors.

Libor
06-29-2005, 01:54 PM
Enyala:
much much thanks for your effort to help CgTalk community! :applause:
In fact Im constantly amazed how much nice and helpful are masters like you here on CGTalk! :bowdown: Itīs just great to be a part of it:D

Now to your tutorial. Its was really helpful! Blending colors in PS is a bit hard compared to Painter (thanks to liquid paint). I all get it, it was really clear, but what would be an "added value" is some practical example. I mean several captures of your piece in different stages of painting (or just portion of it) something like:
1)blocking colors
2)refining shapes
3)blending of colors (i.e. by your favourite style)

Itīs just my 2 cents, you already done a big work for all of us:thumbsup:

Cheers!

JARhead
06-29-2005, 07:53 PM
Lunatique, I just want to say that I absolutly love your custom Pencil. Been using it for a long time now. Thanks!

character
06-30-2005, 12:34 AM
do you have any tips for painting hair?

Lunatique
06-30-2005, 03:37 AM
do you have any tips for painting hair?

Funny you should ask. I have a tutorial on that in the d'artiste book also. :D

I'll generalize it here, but for highly detailed version, you should get the book. It's got multiple tutorials from Linda, me, Phil Straub, and John Wallins, plus tons of great digital paintings from lots of other artists.

Painting hair (my method)

1) Block in the general mass of shape with one single color with a large brush. Do not get into any detail.

2) Block in the general lighting for that mass of shape (large brush still). No details still.

3) Start adding the darker and lighter values with a smaller brush, then blend them to get that silky sheen, but try not to overblend so that you lose the strands.

4) Repeat step 3 but with finer detail.

5) Add some stray strands to give the hair more life.

That's pretty much it. I would highly recommend not painting every single strand, because that generally looks too technical and not very artsy. Simplify hair into various thickness of clumps and strands, and add stray strands as necessary. Also remember that hair should be depicted with gradation of values, because hair almost never creases so sharply to cause a distinct value jump (unless you fold hair, then iron it--which I can't imagine why anyone would do that). Also remember that hair strands will cast shadows onto strands that are underneath them.

character
06-30-2005, 04:30 AM
lol, i have the book, just been so long since i looked through it that i forgot about that hair tute, heh. that and i was also at work when i posted that. i'll go look at it now that i'm home. thanks man =)

Guillermo

nebezial
07-01-2005, 10:35 AM
this is an older tut but it is one way to do hair ...this is mostly for comics ... but maybe ull find something useful bout it
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y145/aquilar/tutorial.jpg

JARhead
07-01-2005, 02:58 PM
Nice one nebezial, really stright forword.:thumbsup:

fabianv
07-01-2005, 03:25 PM
Enayla, your brushes rule. Excuse the bad anatomy :(

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v16/fabianv/55577copy.jpg

cederron
08-16-2005, 05:19 PM
I have just made the best smooth in my life with photoshop, thx to you Enayla. It's shite compared to the ones you see here but still looking good plus i did it with the mouse. Now i have to find the pen. Thx Enayla and the other people who posted tips!

DrFx
08-17-2005, 09:40 AM
Wow, this thread is laden with good advice! Thanks Enayla and everybody! Perhaps this should be made sticky?

jfrancis
08-18-2005, 08:55 PM
http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/images/sketchBookPro.jpg

I like to use an Intuos pen to paint with a hard brush set to pressure-sensitive opacity

jmBoekestein
08-18-2005, 09:25 PM
Funny you should say that... I had an odd problem in trying to work like that. :curious: .

Have a look here: unexpected colourblending (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=238903)

Sometimes it requires a work around, which, to me at least, seems stupendously time consuming for a brush stroke(in the above example that is).

chocolate198
08-21-2005, 01:29 PM
thanks it really helped me !!:D

W4ll4by
11-04-2005, 05:23 PM
Hi linda as you can se im from sweden also but im going to keep this in english cause im not sure if i can type in swedish in here. First of all i made a couple of tries with your shading methods. I used method two cause i think it looks best.


http://www.freewebtown.com/wallaby/ball.jpg
Method 2: used a soft edged brush


http://www.freewebtown.com/wallaby/saturatedball.jpg
Method 2: soft edged brush aswell +
aswell. increased saturation


http://www.freewebtown.com/wallaby/rough.jpg
Method 2: alittle rougher didnt use
a soft edged brush at all just the
spackled one.

I know they aint perfect but im only 16 so im kinda new to this=).
Just a question. do you use a pen aswell when you draw? And does any of the "better" digital artists use a ordinary mouse cause im not realy ready to buy that since it wouldnt be surprising if its quite expensive.
Oh one more question: What size do you normaly work with is it like 1280x1024 or is it realy large like 7000x5000 pixels and then you size it down? What is best how do you get the best results?

okjoss
11-23-2005, 03:38 PM
Hello

Just whant to say thanks for this great post...
this is my test...

http://img492.imageshack.us/img492/3927/35hh.jpg

happy to find this post..
thanks

Joss

Pixelbrush
11-23-2005, 09:25 PM
Thank you for sharing. Interesting thoughts.

roqsteady
12-25-2005, 08:10 PM
wow thats wierd i use some of the same techniques before i ever seen any of your tutorials i play around alot and i read useless tutorials that end up with one good pointer...
i like to use the spacekled brush til i get it blend it nicely then i use the soft edge to blend things better i like to lay my blush and highlight stuff in last over the top of the base blend color

Pixelcritter
01-13-2006, 05:23 AM
If anyone's interested, I could do a Painter blending/rendering comparison to accompany what Linda has done with her Photoshop one.

that sounds good to me :D

Stahlberg
01-13-2006, 09:39 AM
do you use a pen aswell when you draw? And does any of the "better" digital artists use a ordinary mouse cause im not realy ready to buy that since it wouldnt be surprising if its quite expensive. What size do you normaly work with
No sane professional artist would paint with a mouse, no. :)
For prices on equipment, check resellers. A small tablet is not that expensive, and maybe you can even find one secondhand on Ebay.
Sizes vary a lot depending on how the final art will be displayed.

For all other art related questions, try this one:
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=226083

JMcWilliams
01-14-2006, 04:37 PM
No sane professional artist would paint with a mouse, no. :)

Lol, I must be insane then ;)
(though I use pen about 50% of the time)

Stahlberg
01-15-2006, 06:18 AM
You paint and draw freehand strokes with a mouse? By choice? When you have a tablet!? :eek: :)

Why, some kind of carpal thing?

yakumo
01-15-2006, 05:02 PM
Here's what I done, its my first time blending and I have to say I had a lot of fun doing it. I'm more a vector guy so this is really good tut, and has helped me in my work.

JMcWilliams
01-15-2006, 05:22 PM
You paint and draw freehand strokes with a mouse? By choice? When you have a tablet!? :eek: :)?
Yeh, I still find myself using the mouse half the time for painting. I've used the mouse so much that I can paint pretty well with it. I think it might have something to do with all my game playing :D
I used to do pixel painting in paint (and before that Deluxe Paint on the Atari ST) as a kid with a mouse too, although I used to do sprite type stuff and little animations as opposed to full paintings. (those where the days! :D) I don't even think about it, I just find myself using the mouse :banghead:

Thankfully I don't get any Carpal pain so that is not a consideration. I do agree however that you probably have to be mad to use the mouse :D

Nazirull
01-16-2006, 12:52 PM
Wuts Carpal pain?:shrug:

JMcWilliams
01-16-2006, 11:20 PM
RSI and the like...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repetitive_strain_injury

Irate-Velociraptor
02-01-2006, 02:58 AM
Linda thank you for posting this I've trying to figure out a good way to blend colors I'll have to play around some more with this technique. I'm having a problem though my pencil drawing blurs alot easier then my colors.




WIP


http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=310515

arquebus
02-02-2006, 09:15 AM
Can someone refer me to a good book on digital painting? I get so sick of these tutorials where they pick only about 3 or 4 colors that dont look like skin color at all. Smear the canvas with them so it looks like they are making a mud painting, and then by continually refining this mess with scratchy fine strokes until somehow a photorealistic picture emerges. This thread is a good example of that, pic #4 on post #2 the painting makes the transition from kindergarten finger painting too art skill to die for.
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=302580

LadyMedusa
02-02-2006, 10:13 AM
You could have started your own thread, and been a little more polite :s...

You could try "d'artise: digital painting" or experiment a little until you find a way that works for you.. or do bouth. "d'artise: digital painting" is a really good book that offers step to steps and quite some inspiering images :)

Zog
02-02-2006, 10:40 AM
Can someone refer me to a good book on digital painting? I get so sick of these tutorials where they pick only about 3 or 4 colors that dont look like skin color at all.

Yeah, it's so cheap not to include a detailed analysis on skin tones in a tutorial on general blending techniques. Truly sickening. ;)

arquebus
02-02-2006, 03:56 PM
You could have started your own thread, and been a little more polite :s...

I could have, but how many people on this forum want to read a thread about some guy ranting how he hates digital painting tutorials? (seriously, how many people?) Discretion IS the better part of valor.

Irate-Velociraptor
02-03-2006, 07:34 AM
:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: Thank you very much Linda. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

This is a good technique.

Now I just need to practice some more.:)




WIP


http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=310515

mashujun
02-04-2006, 01:57 PM
thank you very much,Linda.
it is very useful

eidolons
02-07-2006, 03:01 PM
Wow some very insightful stuff here. Thanks Linda for the insightful blending techniques and Rob with your comments on how Painter does this kind of thing.

Ok, let me break this down and then if somebody could tell me whether I'm really off here or not let me konw, as I'm really new with this digital painting thing and having the ability to use layers and opacity and all that wonderful stuff. I'm goign to try to work this out in my limited digital vocabulary and hopefully somebody who knows more than me can help me out (or translate, heh!).

Ok Linda is using 6 different colors to create this particular blending example. I don't understand though how the vibrancy colors (the blue and the orange) are fit into the painting, especially the orange (ie, terracotta). Are all 6 colors thrown into the blending area all at once, one neatly aligned next to the other, with practically 100% opacity at the start? And then are they kind of blended together using lower opacity settings by painting a low-opacity "wash" over the adjacent colors to lower the obvious transition from one color to the other? Are we still in the same 'layer'?

Are we using the vibrancy colors (the terracotta and cool lilac again) on the same layer or perhaps on a different layer to provide 'tint'?

Please excuse my beginner ramblings, this thread has been immensely helpful and I just want to make sure I am doing this right.

Also, for those Painter IX people out there, would you effectively blend the transition between these 6 colors through a blending brush like found in the Artist Oils category?

Thanks again guys.

umbrellasky
02-07-2006, 04:20 PM
eidolons: The change in opacity is automatic when using a tablet. So you have the main opacity settings to 100% (you can see this setting on the tool bar near file, Edit, Image and so on.)

Then you have to set you brush opacity to 'pen pressure' you can do this by going to 'brush presets'-'other dynamics'-'opactity jitter, click drop down and select 'pen pressure'

Basically Linda's tutorial is for those who have a Tablet, but I'm sure it's possible without a tablet you will just have to change the opacity manually.

As for layers, this kind of practice is probably done on one layer, well that's how I would do it anyway :)

I hope what I said makes sense and has been any help to you :)

eidolons
02-07-2006, 05:32 PM
Well, in Painter IX I kind of answered my own questions somewhat. It is very easy to blend 6 colors of varied saturation using the blender brush at 100% opacity. I then used a camel hair brush with 0% resat to give it texture at a very low opacity all in the same layer to provide some nice texture. Nowhere close to as professional looking as many of the examples here, but I'm learning. :bounce:

eidolons
02-08-2006, 05:36 PM
I hope what I said makes sense and has been any help to you :)

Enialadam,
Yes it was! I'm about to purchase a tablet myself here pretty soon, and now I am finally making the connection with the whole opacity thing. I didn't realize that you could do that with a tablet as far as opacity and pressing lightly / hard is concerned. Geesh another reason getting one is so imperative I guess.

There is NOTHING more frustrating than painting with a mouse. I even at times had to use a BALL MOUSE. :eek: But one thing I can say about painting with a mouse, and even has some merit. You learn to paint 'backwards' to a certain extent: you can't dwell on the lines, because the lines are jittery and bad, so you work more on volume and mass and all that good stuff from the start, which is a art lesson many art teachers do (have students start backwards so they get away from lines a bit). So in a way, I would recommend beginners to start with a mouse. But to remain SANE, getting away from a mouse as soon as possible is a must.

umbrellasky
02-08-2006, 06:12 PM
eidolons: Awsome, I'm glad what I said helped :) I started off with a mouse too :D

silverrains
02-11-2006, 11:38 PM
:scream: thank you very very very very very very very very veryvery very very very
Much :scream:

ladydove7
02-26-2006, 04:13 PM
Thank you so much for this topic, Linda! I've been a fan of yours for years and seeing a glimpse into how one of the 'masters' work is truly inciteful. I would never have thought to use a speckled brush for blending. I take it this tutorial is more towards base tones than towards creating shades and highlights? I'll have to scour this section and see what I can find on shading. I'm new to digital art so I'm glad to have found something of the basics. I've mostly had experience with cell shading and putting highlights and shadows on seperate layers grouped together for blending.

I've had a problem with blending coming out too 'flat', so I'm really happy to find a method that leaves some sort of texture behind to make the picture come alive.

I still use a mouse too, unfortunately. I find myself relying on it when I want to do certain types of strokes, but then I switch back to the tablet for circular strokes.

Many thanks to Zephyri (http://forums.cgsociety.org/member.php?u=157196) for pointing me in this direction as well! I hope to have some art to share using the techniques I learn about here!

If anyone knows any classic tutorials they can point me to when it comes to skin tones and shading, feel free to point them out! Otherwise, I'm sure I'll find them in here eventually.

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