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Vojislav+Milanovic
06-27-2005, 09:49 PM
It arrived recently. I'm wondering is anyone went through exercises in this book and how really it is helpfull in (re)discovering creativity? I would really want to know some more opinions on this.

Thanks

Lunatique
06-28-2005, 01:03 AM
I'm not a fan of these touchy feely type of books personally. They try to teach people how to think and feel like artists--to be special--and I don't think it's something that could be taught. Either you have the talent, motivation, and perseverance, or you don't. You don't see books that teach you how to cook try to help you "feel like a chef." Either you have the interest to learn and the time to practice, or you don't.

Ilikesoup
06-28-2005, 01:53 AM
All due respect, Lunatique, but how can you condemn a single bood that (I assume) you haven't read just because it's usually shelved in the Psychology section instead of the Art section?

I read the book, though I didn't follow the exercises religiously. Anyway, it's more about making a place in your life for creating art. I found it useful because:
--I'm a perfectionist and had a hard time getting started on any project.
--I didn't see much use in practicing art when I may never make money doing it.

It's that kind of book. It won't teach about shading or anatomy but it clarified my reasons for wanting to create.

jmBoekestein
07-01-2005, 01:28 AM
You don't see books that teach you how to cook try to help you "feel like a chef." Either you have the interest to learn and the time to practice, or you don't.

How much inspiration does a chef need to memorise a recepy?

Inspiration however needs nourishment, psychologically and in ones environment. :shrug:

DaddyMack
07-01-2005, 01:52 AM
How much inspiration does a chef need to memorise a recepy?

Inspiration however needs nourishment, psychologically and in ones environment. :shrug:

Here here!

I read through the book a while back and it basically taught me ways to nourish (nice one JM) my creativity when it lulls instead of trying to force something out... I found the book kinda straightforward, an easy read and very insightful...

Good luck akademus

Vojislav+Milanovic
07-01-2005, 10:34 AM
I already lifted off with it. Almost past first week (or chapter) and beggining to notice few different things about my behaviour while working and some changes in way i think about art in total.

thanks for replys

akademus

Katinka
07-01-2005, 01:25 PM
I read the book and followed the whole 3 months course about 2 years ago. After the course I continued writing morning pages for over a year. Before I started it I found it was very difficult to start drawing. I had put myself down so long (about 10 years) and this book actually helped me to recognize the "bad thought" habits. These days it's hard for me to stop drawing. I owe my recovery as a person and an "artist" to this book but it demanded a lot of work and time. I guess if you don't have problems with your creativity you don't really need this book but I'd recommend it to anyone.

Lunatique: I've read a lot of "how to.." books and this doesn't fall in that category. It doesn't do any work for you. It's a workshop for those who have problems with creativity and I find that the writer knows exactly what she's talking about. Simple readthrough won't cure your problems with bad selfesteem - for me it took a lot of work to simply pick up a pencil.

:thumbsup:

Ilikesoup
07-01-2005, 02:24 PM
For anyone who's interested, Jeanne Carbonetti (http://www.crowhillgallery.com/) has published some books that touch upon some of the same issues. She talks about drawing from the heart and being personally invested in the art you create. It might seem a bit "touchy feely" to some, but I recommend her books to anybody who feels creatively drained -- creating art that moves you (rather than work intended for sale) nourishes the soul.

tayete
07-04-2005, 12:43 PM
I just bought it, and read the first chapters. I don't know what to think. The author started to talk about writing 3 pages every morning and such, to avoid critic thoughts in your work...Well, it looks a bit "new age" to me right now (maybe because I am not too naive in these things).

When I get further I'll post my impressions.

CGmonkey
07-04-2005, 12:59 PM
I'm not a fan of these touchy feely type of books personally. They try to teach people how to think and feel like artists--to be special--and I don't think it's something that could be taught. Either you have the talent, motivation, and perseverance, or you don't. You don't see books that teach you how to cook try to help you "feel like a chef." Either you have the interest to learn and the time to practice, or you don't.

I definitely do not agree with you.

People can change, people can grow intellectually and emotionally by expanding their perseptions. I don't believe in talent, as talent is something you achieve, nothing you are born with.

Everything that can help a person grow in the right direction faster, is positive in my opinion!

Vojislav+Milanovic
07-04-2005, 03:22 PM
well, I just passed on week 2. Yeah, certain things in the beginnig seem to sound, well, let's say, silly, but further i'm going i begin to understand why they are that way, and use of morning pages and artistic dates. However, I ignored those statements in intro chapter concerning God as a creator and so on. I would probably never got to this book unless it was recomended from very great artist (and mentioned a lot in some of his books). I'm talking about Timothy Albee http://www.kazeghostwarrior.com

This is what he wrote:
The Artist’s Way -Julia Cameron
"Top on the list of books I recommend is this one. Why? Because if you’re like most artists who find themselves pulled to 3D, you’re not just good at one thing—you’re good at a whole lot of things. How do you know what you really want to focus your time, energy, and spirit into? This book is made up of exercises that seem like play at first but really help you figure out what you want to devote your time as an artist toward. Perhaps even more valuable, it shows you how to experience the time you spend creating your art as “playtime”; this is the one true secret to letting your work soar to its highest heights more quickly than anything else." - Timothy Albee, CGI Filmmaking: The Creation of Ghost Warrior


tayete: Thank you for reply. It would be great to share experience from someone goin' the same path.

CgMonkey: I totally agree with your opinion about talent. Let me make another quotation:

“The ability to draw is not born into an artist. The desire to draw is.” — Richard Schmid, Alla Prima, Everything I Know About Painting

Maidith
07-04-2005, 06:26 PM
I looked the book up at Amazon... and, um, I might sound paranoid, but it all reminds me of Scientology. :argh:
Alone the saying "the balance of the recording describes how the artist can overcome human tendencies such as jealousy, fear, and addiction." sounds strange. How should someone, here an artists, overcome human tendencies? That's nonsense, if you ask me. Why not becoming an Operating Thetan? :D

apart from that, I agree with Lunatique.

tayete
07-06-2005, 11:01 AM
I would probably never got to this book unless it was recomended from very great artist (and mentioned a lot in some of his books). I'm talking about Timothy Albee http://www.kazeghostwarrior.com

:eek::eek::eek:

Timothy Albee remommended this book??? OMG, I don't remember it, though I have read his book tons of times!!!

To everyone: His book about the Making of Kaze is a MUST. Not because what you'll learn about Lightwave, making sounds and such, but how to deal with a one's man project, how to keep your focus, and specially, how to maintain your ideals through all the obstacles that appear.
This guy, lived alone (well, with his dogs) for 6 months in Alaska to create completely Kaze's DVD. He created the script, concept art of the characters, modelled them, textured, rigged and animated them, recorded the sounds and *all* the voices, and made all the post-production effects and FX. His book is really my bible. If you wish to know how to keep a high morale against all odds (he even suffered a flood that destroyed part of his work), how to schedule a project like that, and how to keep working to follow that deadlines, that is your book. And you'll learn something about LW8 too.

Vojislav+Milanovic
07-06-2005, 12:28 PM
:eek::eek::eek:

Timothy Albee remommended this book??? OMG, I don't remember it, though I have read his book tons of times!!!

To everyone: His book about the Making of Kaze is a MUST. Not because what you'll learn about Lightwave, making sounds and such, but how to deal with a one's man project, how to keep your focus, and specially, how to maintain your ideals through all the obstacles that appear.
This guy, lived alone (well, with his dogs) for 6 months in Alaska to create completely Kaze's DVD. He created the script, concept art of the characters, modelled them, textured, rigged and animated them, recorded the sounds and *all* the voices, and made all the post-production effects and FX. His book is really my bible. If you wish to know how to keep a high morale against all odds (he even suffered a flood that destroyed part of his work), how to schedule a project like that, and how to keep working to follow that deadlines, that is your book. And you'll learn something about LW8 too.

yup, all true,
i've read it few months ago and it is very inspiring and thoughtful book. I was amazed with amount of job he pulled by himself. BTW quotation about Julia's book is from LW Essentials but he mentioned it few times in Filmmaking of Kaze.

tayete: it's on pages 130-131 of Filmaking of Ghost Warrior

DaddyMack
07-06-2005, 08:44 PM
Oooh kaze sounds like another 'must own'... thanks for the headsup guys

jmBoekestein
07-06-2005, 08:54 PM
I looked the book up at Amazon... and, um, I might sound paranoid, but it all reminds me of Scientology. :argh:
Alone the saying "the balance of the recording describes how the artist can overcome human tendencies such as jealousy, fear, and addiction." sounds strange. How should someone, here an artists, overcome human tendencies? That's nonsense, if you ask me. Why not becoming an Operating Thetan? :D

apart from that, I agree with Lunatique.

You're not saying you'd be giving in to something like jealousy and kill someone over that. I'm betting you wouldn't anbd have somewhat overcome that in yourself ;). It's not only scientology, it's also philosophy, love for wisdom literally translated from greek.

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