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robbyhsu
06-22-2005, 03:56 PM
Hi,
I am new in 3D animation, I would be making a short film for a demo reel shortly, by what I had gathered I have enlisted the following steps in the making of a short film. I specified weights (out of 10) according to the time that I should be spending on the steps, I need some input from you guys,
1) whether I have missed any crucial step
2) Whether the order of the steps are alright
3) If the weights I have put is ok..

The steps are as follows:
Step01: Story Concept (7)
Step02: Story Detailing (4)
Step03: Character Sketch (7)
Step04: Storyboard (6)
Step05: Modelling (6)
Step06: Character Rigging (6)
Step07: Animation (5)
Step08: Camera Setup (4)
Step09: Lighting (4)
Step10: Texture (4)
Step11: Post Production (3)

All feedbacks and suggestions will be most welcomed.

Thanks in advance,
Robert.

dobermunk
06-23-2005, 09:15 AM
Hi Robert, all the best on your film.

Don't forget the very important animatic. If you come from 2D, think of this as the leica reel. Basically, make the film, only don't worry about anything technical - no rig, render or anything but camera, position, story and timing. Sound is another important factor to work in at least sketch-quality during this phase.
If its a simple production, might be overlappable with layout (camera work) but do it early on, right after storyboard. Use simple 3D stand-in objects if you like, but spend the effort to do this. It'll pay off later.

zurfer
06-23-2005, 11:03 AM
The animatic or Leica-reel is often just the storyboards cut together in to a whole so that you can time your movie and andjust for problems in editing before you even get to animation. After that you can start making rough animation jsut blocking in large movements in characters and camera and slowly start to exchange the edited storyboards so that you get what is called a pre-visualization. After tweaking everything on to animation. Swap the previz renders for the completed animation and tweak and your ready for final post-production.

As for your list I think it all depends on what your good at and what you like doing. Perhaps you should put more time on the things you know you have to get better on or perhaps you should enlist the help of some friends on those parts if yuo know the movie will get better for it.

A story might write it self or perhaps you have to struggle and twist you plot-point over and over or rework a char a lot of times. It all depends on the project. If your under a deadline or you know that if you work on the project for too long you'll get bored or if you think that it's not going to be as great as you first thought and you'd rather just dump it. All these situations will demand different pipelines.

Pesonally I try to spend as much time as is needed for me to be truly satisfied with one part while I spen a little of my spare time on the other parts by the side. When I feel saitsfied I move on to the next part and work on it untill I get satisfied. If you stumble on to a problem you might have to go bakc and rework on of the previous parts. Its all parallell to eachother. One thing that works in a script might not work in pictures and so on.

Well I've gotten wuite long winded so I think I will stop here but I hope this helps you a bit.

Peter

PS: Doing a project by your self can get tedious and you might loose the passion. I try to write down what I liked about a project so when I come to that place when I want to do nothing but curl in to a ball and weep I can go back to these notes and see that there was actually something i loved about this and I'm just jaded for having worked on it for to long. A gag might not be funny when you read it for the 100th time or a dramatic sceen might seem bland when you've wathed it over and over the past month. Remember what you liked with it in the first place and don't be afraid to show your work to people who you know will come with constructive critisism.DS

robbyhsu
06-23-2005, 03:02 PM
Hi,
Thank you both for your prompt feedback... it was good that you all reminded me about the Sound part... I had completely forgotten about it in my pipeline..:eek: so by what you all are saying.. i should be incorporating it very early in the development phase.. then will come animatics.. by the way.. what do you think will be the best way to create the sound, search for it on the net? or maybe generate it myself (like those folly artist we see on film :D, FYI I dont have a very hi fi infrastructure.. just a humble little microphone ).. and when should I be incorprating the sound into the movie.. directly inset it into 3DS Max? or should I incorporate it post production stage?

Thanks again,
Regards,
Robert

zurfer
06-23-2005, 08:50 PM
For the sound you could start off by doing a scratch-track. record a cold-reading of the script for the dialouge and just use what ever sound are avaliable to you or make som of them yourself. Cut the Animatic with the storyboards to this sound and then work on recording it as professional as possible on the way. Try to animate to sound that is as close to or is the actual sound you will use but for the animatic a scratch-track will probobly suffice.


Best regards

Peter

mberrynk
06-27-2005, 03:55 PM
using a scratch track is absolutely important, but i wouldn't put your final tracks into your 3d app. there are all sorts of issues with that, including only having one track for audio. Use an editing program like adobe premiere which gives you multiple tracks, that way you can have your dialogue on one, sound effects on another, music, etc. These programs also give you a much easier way to manipulate the order once your reel is ready.

As to your process, making an animated short, especially by yourself, is like building a house of cards...if your model's suck then they won't animate correctly, if your sound sucks then the whole film will lose credibility, but I would definitely say the most important elements are story and animation. The idea and the execution of the idea. Great technical effects are great to look at but without a good story, the audience will lose interest quickly no matter how spectacular that fireball is. And of course, animation is all about acting, so a polished animation is crucial. :buttrock:

JMcWilliams
06-29-2005, 07:43 AM
Hi,
I am new in 3D animation, I would be making a short film for a demo reel shortly, by what I had gathered I have enlisted the following steps in the making of a short film. I specified weights (out of 10) according to the time that I should be spending on the steps, I need some input from you guys,
1) whether I have missed any crucial step
2) Whether the order of the steps are alright
3) If the weights I have put is ok..

The steps are as follows:
Step01: Story Concept (7)
Step02: Story Detailing (4)
Step03: Character Sketch (7)
Step04: Storyboard (6)
Step05: Modelling (6)
Step06: Character Rigging (6)
Step07: Animation (5)
Step08: Camera Setup (4)
Step09: Lighting (4)
Step10: Texture (4)
Step11: Post Production (3)

All feedbacks and suggestions will be most welcomed.

Thanks in advance,
Robert.

ooh, i'm not sure I like texturing being at step10 :D Thats very late. :O

robbyhsu
06-29-2005, 12:01 PM
Hi All,
Thanks all for your response.. I have been interested with working on 3D.. ever since I started my course in computer arts.. I had always wanted to work with 3d.. and that was 5 years ago.. but due to lots of reason.. I couldnt pursue it.. so worked a lot in print and web designing... and subsequently that became my source of income.. I couldnt put my full mind into print earlier on and then web.. Flash to be more specific later on because I have always thought that 3D is where my future lies.. So when I got fired from the last company where I was working as a Web Designer.. I decided to move into 3D full time.. rejected a few offers from other company to work as a graphic designer..

Since I didnt have much working knowledge of 3D.. I thought of going through few books ... and then later on building a full Demo Reel (thus the cgtalk topic) so that iI can apply in a few companies based in India..I sat down and started following book.. namely Mastering the Art of Production by Jason Busby.. the chapters till modelling was fine.. but when it came to Character Rigging.. I realised that god!!! its going to atleast take 2 years of full time work to actually get a firm hold on 3D.. Modelling and Animation (which what I wanted to do eventually).. but due to financial pressure and my age.. I am 26!!!.. I am finally giving up on 3D.. :sad: , and am going to move full time into Flash..

Yes.. you all can say I lack the passion.. and the perseverance.. to actually make it in 3D.. and maybe you all are right.. I guess 3D was just a fantasy for me.. and and now the decision that i am taking is a more rational one.. I hope so.. another factor that pushed me into taking the decision is that .. 3D studios in India are sweatshops.. ,most of the 3d works that have been outsourced to India are just very mechanical work and lacks zero creativity.. where just labour is involved.. on the other hand Flash work here are more challenging..

So end my posts here.. though whatever replies i have got have been quite enlightening... but sorry I will not be able to put it in use.. but hopefully someone else who is interested in the process of Demo Reel will find this post informative and helpful..

Thanks once again... and Adieu..
Regards,
Robert

cok3
07-02-2005, 10:12 PM
dude I wouldn't give up on 3d so easily. I with a little perseverance you I'm sure you can pull it off! I'm just a beginner in 3D myself, majored in multimedia, and on my the last semester I finally decided to become serious in 3D, thx to a lot of video tutorials and books I was able to complete my 3D short. I can tell you now that yeah while it might not be of the quality you see in this forum, I've learned more from this short than I did in my previous 5 semesters. I would stick to it man, if it was really what you've been wanting to do all along. And yes it might take a while to get the hang of it, you might ask "well how old will I be when I finally do this?" as a saying of a book i've read goes, the same age you will be if you do nothing about it at all. I can tell you now that I'm no model student or anything, in fact I may have been one of the laziest people in my class, but i work as hard as my lazyness/procrastination could permit me to. And no I don't think you lack the passion, just accept it and let it take over. Give it a chance, don't give up before you've even started... And man, if you fail, believe me, the learning experience will be more valuable than you can imagine.

Just incase you still wanna go with it I'll reccomend some books to get you started.

Inspired 3D SHORT FILM PRODUCTION by Jeremy Cantor and Pepe Valencia
This is my second bible, it tells you all you need to know about creating short films, the software side is general so it can be applied to anything, and it explains the process of creating films from story, characters, art direction, storyboarding, animatics, sound, modelling, texturing, rigging, animaiton, Lighting and rendering, visual effects, compositing, even marketing and distribution.

The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron
A great book for anyone in the field of art. This kept me goin and helped me reach the finnish line.

The Animators Survival Kit by Richard Williams
Almost everything you need to know about animation (in any field).


Lightwave Tutorials/books

digiwonks rigging tutorial (free at kurv studios)
todd grimes' facial animation dvd

Lightwave 8 Cartoon Character Creation Volumes 1 and 2 by Jonny Gorden
covers modelling, weight maps, rigging, and animation


Hope this stuff helps just incase you decide to continue with 3D, good luck man

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