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plastik892
06-18-2005, 02:59 AM
I recently purchased a Wacom Intuos3 tablet. Im a fairly experienced artist and am a graphic designer by trade, but Im finding the tablet usage taxing. What I know I can do smoothly by hand is difficult at best digitally. Can someone give me insight, but personal experience I guess, as to how long it may take to adjust? And are their exercises I should be aware of that would speed my development along?

Thanks.

Drevious
06-18-2005, 02:27 PM
1. dont draw digitally as in real, and dont expect to totally imitate natural drawing tricks
2. still, drawing on a elbow works as in real, and its quite useful, but if u got tablet smaller than A4 (and A5 which is to small for me for example) it would be hard.
3. excercise- tutorials, there is A LOT of free tutorials over internet where u can find what is the philosophy of a digital process. hmm check for example feng zhu web site. artbyfeng.com - there is a quite nice walkthrough steps

good luck, let the force be with you :)

plastik892
06-19-2005, 09:10 AM
1. dont draw digitally as in real, and dont expect to totally imitate natural drawing tricks
2. still, drawing on a elbow works as in real, and its quite useful, but if u got tablet smaller than A4 (and A5 which is to small for me for example) it would be hard.
3. excercise- tutorials, there is A LOT of free tutorials over internet where u can find what is the philosophy of a digital process. hmm check for example feng zhu web site. artbyfeng.com - there is a quite nice walkthrough steps

good luck, let the force be with you :)

Thanks for the thoughts. :D

lokki
06-20-2005, 04:52 AM
The only exercise I can recommend is playing. Seriously. Work like you expect to, and learn the adjustments as necessary. And don't look at your hand!

I've been using Wacom tablets for about 6 years, and won't consider doing any extensive work without one. In that time, I've gone through 3 different sizes, and settled on the 6x8 (US inches) for a variety of reasons; it is a comfortable size to hold, it feels right (I've adapted my technique and am very comfortable zooming in/out as needed), and it fits both the space on my desk and in my laptop case.

It will take several hours of using the tablet in pen mode to begin to get it right, but it's worth it. The pressure control alone is phenominal, especially when you consider you can control tons of parameters in unnatural ways :)

Keep at it, do some basic excercises to train your hand and eye (whatever your usual routine is), and do it some more. It's a new tool, treat it as such ;)

ThomasMahler
06-20-2005, 07:44 AM
It really takes time to get used to - As I got my Intuos 2, I also was like "What the hell? This doesn't feel like pencil and paper at all!". And it doesn't until today.

BUT, as soon as you'll get used to it, you'll love it. It's not the imitation of pencil and paper or natural media, it's a new, very handy tool - And believe me, after about a month working with your tablet, you won't go back to a mouse again for almost any digital task.

greekdish
06-20-2005, 02:43 PM
Thanks to the advice of a fellow members on these forums, I went and bought myself a Toshiba Tecra M4 Tablet PC. If you are interested in "seeing what you draw", I highly recommend either a Cintiq, or a Tablet PC. :)

frog
06-20-2005, 03:02 PM
It takes a little practice, frustrating at first but in a couple of weeks you'll get used to it. Soon enough it becomes second nature. The slippery feel is more akin to using a brush with ink than a pencil, but again it's something you just get used to.

Smooth lines are the hardest thing, and even harder in Photoshop. For a better experience I recommend Painter or Sketchbook. I have an article about getting nice lines from a tablet here:

http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/lines.htm

It explains the best way to get good results (in my experience), and is pretty comprehensive.

paintbox
06-20-2005, 04:49 PM
Feng Zhu also commented a few on times on the use of tablets.

http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?p=2217816&highlight=tablet#post2217816

plastik892
06-21-2005, 07:25 AM
I realize this topic, or similar, comes up often and thank everyone who has responded. Ive been away from fine art for awhile now for any number of reasons. I think this was a worthy purchase and hope sooner than later Ill be posting more in the submission section as as opposed to the help. :)

Also thanks for the linkers. Not being able to draw a smooth line is driving me crazy.:scream:

Blikkie
06-21-2005, 07:32 AM
Oh, and Feng mentioned that he knew people who cover their tablet with paper.

I do that to and I love it. The resistance is much more like paper with a pencil and I found it much better than the slippery surface I had before. Apart from that I happen to like the tabletmouse and with a piece of paper I don't scratch the surface.

lokki
06-22-2005, 05:23 AM
fwiw, the new Intuos3 feels much better than the previous models... there are tips made from different materials, each of which has a different touch.

DrFx
06-22-2005, 02:07 PM
Oh, and Feng mentioned that he knew people who cover their tablet with paper.

I do that to and I love it. The resistance is much more like paper with a pencil and I found it much better than the slippery surface I had before. Apart from that I happen to like the tabletmouse and with a piece of paper I don't scratch the surface.

Doesn't the paper wear the tip out too fast? Could we replace the tip for something more durable? It seems to be made of the same slippery plastic that's on the bottom of mice, is this true?

scrimski
06-22-2005, 03:31 PM
The only exercise I can recommend is playing. Seriously. Work like you expect to, and learn the adjustments as necessary. And don't look at your hand!

Second that.
I played Solitaire with the pen for a week days while rendering and it was like I was born with this tablet.

DorisDay
06-22-2005, 05:17 PM
Oh, and Feng mentioned that he knew people who cover their tablet with paper.

I do that to and I love it. The resistance is much more like paper with a pencil and I found it much better than the slippery surface I had before. Apart from that I happen to like the tabletmouse and with a piece of paper I don't scratch the surface.

I actually cover my tablet with frisket film & it works a treat (plus I no longer need frisket film, because I no longer airbrush) smoother than paper but rougher than the tablet surface...:)

plastik892
06-22-2005, 10:41 PM
Im using normal copier paper over the tablet surface with the 'graphite' pen tip at this point. Already seeing some control improvement. :thumbsup:

Ghost23
07-19-2005, 02:28 AM
Yeah I just got my Graphire 3 like a year ago but I never had that much difficulty when I first started, although I do have a bit of problem when it came to painting with it due to it being pressure sensitive. I just kept playing with it and eventually I got the hang of it, I may not be a master at it but I try to make sure the programs I use are adjusted to me pressure wise although painter isn't that co operative in that department as photoshop is until I down loaded Lunatique's custom pencil brush. I can actually draw pretty well on it now, just gotta get over the lack of resistant when drawing with the tablet as oppose to drawing on paper. Basically it jsut takes time and experimenting to get use to using a tablet.

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