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GothTropic411
06-14-2005, 12:42 AM
Help! CG art and Blender are ruining my drawing skills! While I can sit in front of the PC for hours in order to model something new, I can only sit down for an hour at maximum to draw something with paper and pencil! I've even lost some of the will to draw at times!

Can the CG bug be cured(sorta)? Can I ever get back my will to draw? Tell me before I lose my abilities to...the wrath of the machiiiines.........Hasta la Vista, Baby!(crap! teh terminator's killed my drawing ability!)

Alright, I'm getting random there...but is there anything I could do to restore my willingness to sit down and draw whenever? Help would be appreciated.
~GothTropic411

P.S. Please visit my art gallery @ http://suu999.deviantart.com !

jmBoekestein
06-14-2005, 03:29 AM
Hey sue, I warn you, be careful what you ask for ;). Have a look at my 2d wip( in my signature).

Your stuff looks nice to me, no complaints :shrug:.

offbeatworlds
06-14-2005, 05:42 PM
First of all, take a really deep breath, and relax.

Now, you're problem is not a problem at all. Everybody suffers from losing the will to draw occasionally, and most can't draw for a really long period of time anyways. I myself can't draw for more than two or three hours at a time. Digital painting is the same. I really, truly don't think that you need to worry about this. Besides, if you're thinking that CG is causing you to draw badly, that is not the case. One cannot draw well with every picture. It's just nature that an artist comes out with bad pictures or has a bad streak everyone and a while. I'm sure your drawing will be back to their normal, wonderful selves in no time. Don't panic.

Besides, from what your post said, CG isn't actually ruining your drawing abilities, just taking you away from them, distracting you. Try to balance them out. If you want to spend more time on drawing, and less on CG, then force yourself to do so. Force is sometimes the only way around an obstacle.

Ilikesoup
06-14-2005, 09:00 PM
I experienced something like that recently. I'm strictly a 2D guy--for years I did either pencil sketches or inked cartoons. It's only a year that I've been digital painting but now I can't think in terms of lines, only color. I know the knowledge of how to draw with lines is in my brain somewhere, but I can't switch easily from one mode to the other.

If you really want to focus on drawing, the best thing to do would be to shelve the 3D for a few weeks. Just as an experiment. :shrug:

Lunatique
06-15-2005, 03:16 AM
I can't really relate to your problems, since I draw digitally exactly the same way I draw traditionally. If you looked at my drawings in both mediums, they look exactly the same.

The only thing digital did to me was spoiling me in terms of undo's. When I make a crappy brushstroke in oil paint, the first thing that goes off in my mind is "Where's my f$%king undo?!"

paperclip
06-15-2005, 08:04 AM
Finding 'proper' colors in traditional media has always been a problem for me...the colors change as it dries and also the EXACT color is hard to come by. I do wish I knew more about color mixing...
As for drawing....you are probably just having a dry spell. Do what I do and keep a sketchpad OPEN at all times beside the computer and a pen....you will be able to sketch anything that 'comes' to you then much more easily (instead of having to go out of your way to find a pen...)

CG has improved my traditional art skills- so far...

Lunatique
06-15-2005, 08:28 AM
Finding 'proper' colors in traditional media has always been a problem for me...the colors change as it dries and also the EXACT color is hard to come by. I do wish I knew more about color mixing...


Traditional colors are very hard. Mixing color traditionally is nothing like the digital process. You take the exact same two colors and mix them in digital and traditional, and the results won't be the same. Real paint have many different physical properties that you don't need to deal with digitally. Tinting strength, tranparency, lighfastness..etc all play a part. For example, pthalo blue has ridiculously strong tinting strength. Adding just a tiny bit of it will be far stronger than any other blue. Mixing a color with white digitally will give you completely different result than taking a color traditionally and mixing it with white. The chroma of the traditional version will be much higher. These are just some very basic differences--it gets much more complex than that once you get deeper into traditional paint. For example, titanium white, zinc white, flake white, creminitz white, permalba white..etc all behave differently and look differently, as does ivory black, lamp black, mars black..etc.

If you want to train yourself in traditional colors, you do the legendary Schmid color chart. First, decide just what your permanent palette colors are (Schmid uses 12 colors. I use about 20). Then, you do a chart with all the colors in 5-value gradations with titanium white as the mixer. After that, comes the hard part. You then do the next sheet by taking a single color from your permanent palette and mixing it with all the other 11 color, and do the same 5-value scale. Your mixtures should have that single color to just slightly more dominating than the other 11 colors. Eventually, you should end up with every color in your palette mixed with all the other colors. This might sound more tedius than hard, but trust me, it's hard as hell because it requires very intense focus during the entire process. You doze for a tiny moment and you end up with unbalanced scales and color mixtures.

Here's what mine looks like (just the first sheet): http://www.ethereality.info/ethereality_website/paintings_drawings/oils/studio_space/painting_studio-02.jpg

Be very careful if you going to do the charts. What looked like a good balance on the palette, will look quite different once you actually paint the squares in. When that happens, scrape them off and redo it. My strategy is this: mix all five values on the palette so you can visually compare them. Paint them in only after you are sure you have a balanced scale (but that's no guarantee you got it right, as I mentioned earlier). My charts are just sheets of gesso-primed canvas glued to a plastic sheet for support. It's not as rigid as I'd like, but I didn't like the idea of using anything too heavy or too thick (Schmid uses foamcore). If you are curious about my palette, it's:

Top rows (from left to right): Lemon Yellow, Cadmium Yellow, Cadmium Yellow Deep, Cadmium Orange, Cadmium Red Medium, Permanent Alizarin, Magenta, Cobalt Violet, Ultramarine Blue, Cobalt Blue.


Bottom rows (from right to left): Pthalo Blue (I might replace this with Cerulean Blue, but I can mix cerulean Blue easily, while you can't mix Pthalo Blue), Viridian, Pthalo Green, Permanent Sap Green, Yellow Ochre, Burnt Sienna, Venetian Red, Burnt Umber, Ivory Black, Lamp Black.

John Keates
06-15-2005, 09:42 AM
Wow! That Schmid thing seems like a lot of work! Don't forget that the colours change when they are used transparently also. I tend to just embrace the complex alchamy of it all and wing it as I go allong.

GothTropic411 H, I know what you mean. I don't think that computers ruin the drawing thing, it can just take a while to get back into it. It can be a different mind-set. I don't find it a problem so much with drawing but more with painting - particulalry the 'no undo' thing that lunatique mentioned.

I think computers can make us a bit lazy as you kind of expect there to be a button for everything and you can also rely on being able to make adjustments which can't be done so easily on 'real life'.

However, I have found that I have learned things by using computers which help my paintings. You can produce colour sketches much faster. Also, I really learned a lot about anatomy when I rigged a shuolder realistically.

cyartist
06-15-2005, 03:53 PM
Digital the blessing and the curse of artists. Low entry point if you get past the price point. Explains the lack of discipline outside of traditional. Or it may because of the global connectivity we see the good and the bad art. And there will always be more bad art than good. The natural order of things.

ThirdEye
06-16-2005, 12:12 AM
Help! CG art and Blender are ruining my drawing skills! While I can sit in front of the PC for hours in order to model something new, I can only sit down for an hour at maximum to draw something with paper and pencil! I've even lost some of the will to draw at times!

Can the CG bug be cured(sorta)? Can I ever get back my will to draw? Tell me before I lose my abilities to...the wrath of the machiiiines.........Hasta la Vista, Baby!(crap! teh terminator's killed my drawing ability!)

Alright, I'm getting random there...but is there anything I could do to restore my willingness to sit down and draw whenever? Help would be appreciated.
~GothTropic411

P.S. Please visit my art gallery @ http://suu999.deviantart.com !

you forgot a picture of the crow and a depressing poem... i guess... or something

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