PDA

View Full Version : Rendering short movies


greyface
06-04-2005, 07:03 PM
Hey folks, wasn't sure where to ask this :) as it's not specific to any board, but here it is:

What do you guys consider an acceptable render time per movie frame, for a "home production" (I got about 3-4 render nodes) ?

What's the standard frame-rate for an animation? Is it the usual 29 fps of ntsc?

thanks

desty

DoubleSupercool
06-05-2005, 01:43 PM
I can't speak for everyone as I am only just learning myself, but really I guess you have to work out how long your movie will be and then work it out from there. If it's a 10 second job, maybe 5 minutes a frame is acceptable, but move up to a couple of minutes and that's a heck of a long time.

In my mind, 5 minutes is a long time per frame for a home production. I just picked 5 minutes out of the air, based on complex lighting/textures/models at high-res.

Let's see, using 5 minutes/frame (my maths isn't so good):

3 minute movie = 180 seconds (3x60)
180 secs @ 30 fps = 5400 frames
5400 frames * 5 minutes/frame = 27,000 minutes
27,000 mins/60 = 450 hrs
450 hrs/24 = 18.75 days non stop rendering on one machine.

So, more than half a month just to render it, or perhaps a solid week on 3-4 machines.

I have been looking at ways to cut down my production time and give me more flexibility and have been teaching myself about rendering in passes and layers so I can tweak them in a 2D compositing app. Much less time consuming than fiddling with small changes in 3D. Much faster to do things like (faked) depth of field and special effects etc.

Megalodon
06-06-2005, 06:44 AM
It really depends on just how complex your scenes are. You may have a simple scene on a 3.6ghz machine w/2gb of RAM that will take 15 seconds. The same scene on a 2.4 with 512mb of RAM may take more than a minute.Then you may have a very complex scene with lots of human characters that may take 45 minutes or longer per frame on the same machine. Home production or professional - it all comes down to complexity and machine power.

There's no cut and dry answer or wrong and right - you make the scene as you see fit and if you feel it's taking too long, see where you can optimize.

Megalodon

tibes
06-06-2005, 08:11 AM
I guess a good rule of thumb (particularly given you have a bunch of render nodes), is that you don't ever want to be waiting for output and unable to work.

So long as you can keep working and get feedback when you need it, the time is irrelevant. :)

digikris
06-06-2005, 06:59 PM
I agree with tibes... If you have render nodessss..why to bother about time its noway going to affect your work. I have a apple mac G5 and i do complex shots and add filters and textures and do other jobs on the same machine while i'm rendering. I don't have any issues.

cementarygate
06-09-2005, 01:17 AM
well im no pro on this, but i have a p4 2.5 ghz, and i use premiere pro, i do a lot of home projects, and i always export to dvd (.m2v, mpg2)
or dv avi.

for a 5 min short, on .m2v= 720x480 30fps, rendering time is 15 min and i use a lot of filters, if the video is 30 min, rendering time is 90 min. but since i always export to dvd, i export the audio separetly, and add it as an audio track in encore dvd, thats how it works for me this if for film,

if youre talking about 3d, i render at 24fps 640x480, if the scene isnt so complex, it will be about, 4 min per frame, but if there´s advanced materials, itll be like 10 min, but in these cases i always turn to composition.

greyface
06-12-2005, 11:04 PM
Thanks a lot for the replies, I forgot about this thread :banghead: - What I'm thinking about is not in particular the final render time, but rather - how long are you usually prepared to wait each time you render a shot. I've considered a GI solution which would take about 5min per frame and a non-GI which takes less than a minute. The movie is about 8 minutes long and I'm going to invest in 4 render nodes, so it would be like a 2min movie on a single machine.

What have you guys put up with? I'm wondering how much of a problem it is to have a final frame which takes 10min+ to render, as you can use lower settings when working on the movie. Or you can do this per shot.

cementarygate
06-14-2005, 01:24 AM
well i think its really up to you, but if youre getting paid for it, i think it should be high quality, im having the same problems right now, i want to use subsurface scattering and gi and all the things i learned about in the past 6 months, and im always looking for ways fot lowering rendering time, and the tests i made so far, looks way better than my last animation that had no gi, so i think it was really worth it even if it took 2 hours just to render 1 second

mlmiller1983
06-14-2005, 02:34 AM
well i think its really up to you, but if youre getting paid for it, i think it should be high quality, im having the same problems right now, i want to use subsurface scattering and gi and all the things i learned about in the past 6 months, and im always looking for ways fot lowering rendering time, and the tests i made so far, looks way better than my last animation that had no gi, so i think it was really worth it even if it took 2 hours just to render 1 second

Curious but what are your specs and what 3D software package are you using. Thanks

colintheys
06-14-2005, 05:45 AM
My theory: don't decide how long it should take per frame. Decide how long it should take per shot. I did my renders over night. So I figure I can allow 6 -8 hours per shot. If the average shot length is 10 seconds, that's about 1.5 minutes per frame. That said, I've tolerated much much longer render times. It's all a matter of balancing what you need / what you want / when you want it / and fine control.

visionist
06-14-2005, 09:39 AM
For a sec there I thought you where just rendering a movie in premier or final cut but it sounds like you are talking about rending in a 3d package is this correct? well if it is I know in Maya there are many thing you can do to optimize a scene to make it fun/render a little bit faster suck as deleting history. What package are you using so maybe someone using the same software, might know some techniques or secrets to do the same to optimize a scene for rending.



LmB

greyface
06-17-2005, 06:10 PM
Thanks for the replies, Colintheys - that's a good idea, I'll try that. I'm rendering in XSI with mental ray, but the problem isn't really optimization, it's manageability. GI is going to take more time than old school lighting whatever you do. I'm wondering if there's a real advantage of seeing almost-final renders while you're working on the movie.

I guess one way to do it is to test shots by rendering the whole shot in pretty low quality, and then renering a single frame at full quality..

cementarygate
06-20-2005, 09:55 PM
Curious but what are your specs and what 3D software package are you using. Thanks

p4 2.5, 512mb ram, 120gb hard drive, 128mb geforce fx 5200


3ds max,

mental ray if the material is the most important aspect of the scene (i think mental ray's materials work better and i understand them better)

brazil if the most important aspect of the scene is GI.

but it depends sometimes, im doing a tv ad for a gas station, and the character is just running in a desert, but they liked how it looked cell shaded,, so i just used max standard ink/paint material using the standard renderer, and rendering times are less than 1 min. i was so worried about rendering times cause i thought i definately had to use gi, but they liked it cell shaded style, so that was a big save

CGTalk Moderation
06-20-2005, 09:55 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.