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View Full Version : What drives you, why do you love cg?


-NG-
05-25-2005, 01:35 AM
I'm curious to know what drives people, who do cg. What factor is the biggest player that made you decide to do cg? Let's post it.

For me there's one main reason, i do it because i now have something to put my imagination in, a kind of a exhaust. I'm a dreamer and sometimes i get washed away in my own worlds. Thanks to CGI i now have a place to make bring those "worlds and ideas" to live. :)

paperclip
05-25-2005, 01:42 AM
I love it for the same reason that I love pens and paper.

That, and because it's easier to clean up after than oils. :)

virgo1
05-25-2005, 02:06 AM
All it took was a small "taste" of cg and I knew it was the direction to go. Unimaginable art media is now at my finger tips. With all the art stuff around this house I'd be hard pressed to find space for an airbrush booth.

CG is also dovetailing nicely with the unplugged art I do such as thumbnails for jewelry design or cartoons for a tapestry.

What I love though is knowing there are endless possibilities.

Enayla
05-25-2005, 03:07 AM
I've always painted for the simple reason that I love it and that's still why I'm doing it though I've moved it over to the computer. I love coming up with little storylines and then trying to paint them unto a canvas - and once I got my grubby little hands on my first Wacom, I knew I'd found the perfect tool for me to use. I'm a coward with a regular brush, and I progressed really slowly with one. The ability to save one image in any number of versions really, really helped me out.

Now that I've worked with the Wacom for, uh, seven or eight years, I'm honestly considering hopping back to oils and acrylics this summer. Mainly because it would be fun to have a couple of 'originals' rather than a bunch of paintings that don't exist, as such, in any physical kind of space. I hope I get the time to, I really do, it would be so much fun :]

ashakarc
05-25-2005, 03:46 AM
I don't "love" CG, I just find it the best possible alter reality that I could be at, and produce. What drives me has nothing to do with technology, it is the amalgamation of experiences in my earlier youth.


It is great to be in touch with reality from time to time, you just appreciate more of its opposite.

Cheers fellow avatars ;]

Addendum: I work with forms and spaces, being an architect, If it could explain the above!

cha0t1c1
05-25-2005, 04:43 AM
for me CG is my great equalizer...ever since my injury I have only been able to use the pen/pencil on paper combination; however CG in all its glory allowes me to be an equal in capability with my peers...(I hope I get the ability to produce good work with CG)...I'm one of those persons who are gratefull for the inventors of CG, otherwise I'd have been another bad sketcher, now I can be a bad painter too :blush: ...

erilaz
05-25-2005, 04:56 AM
I love stories. I used to write and act a hell of a lot in my early years, and when I realised I could combine all that into art and animation I knew I'd found my niche. I like to allow other people to immerse tehmselves in another world.

Grondhammar
05-25-2005, 05:55 AM
I'm driven to paint so the voices in my head will stop shouting at me. CG allows me to do this without passing out from the turpentine fumes.

jmBoekestein
05-25-2005, 06:11 AM
I'm a freak :D...

oh yeah, I can make photoreal stuff and make it move...:)


OK, seriously...Everything I can clearly outline in my mind, I can clearly define through the computer. It takes time and energy. But, if you point me to something more flexible and wider in it's capacity, I'd rather have that. I don't think it's some magical tool that allows my every whim onto reality, it simply has ctrl-z and some other stuff I don't know about yet...

Linda, I'm telling you. Stay away from the brushes, last time I used them I was cleaning paint of walls and muttering incomprehensible ravings. Uhm wait...the last part is from when I was a little older.
Just kidding, good luck with it, I find it is rather therapeutic(in the end:rolleyes: )

Squibbit
05-25-2005, 09:16 AM
I wanted to be a killer , but didn't have love for it

I tried to be a healer, but hated it

Now I'm just lying somewhere in between

GrM
05-25-2005, 10:30 AM
by day I'm a psychotic mutant cyborg ninja and by night I like to use digital art as a release for my creativity. I love art, love computers, combine the two and its perfect.

willemo
05-26-2005, 01:29 PM
Simple - I love being creative. And CG has so many advantages over traditional mediums...
Ever wanted to hit CTRL+Z when doing a pencil sketch?
Or wanted to zoom in or add a layer or two when doing an oil painting?

CG also means you have an unlimited supply of brushes, paint and paper.

It's awesome!

Empath
05-26-2005, 06:39 PM
For me it came down to a choice of medium. I'm one of those weird people who's both right and left brained, and have for a long time been bouncing between being certain of an insane array of different goals in life. Everything from acting to astrophysics to philosohpy to architectural design to electrical engineering to film directing to teaching to sociology to cg to politics to writing to industrial design to stock broking to concept art and oh so many more... ln the end I decided I wanted to do something where I could apply both my creative and analytical abilities, and after graduating at seventeen I needed to choose SOMETHING, and at that point in time the CG medium seemed most appealing as I have some experience working with computers and thought it would be where I could best apply myself. Unfortunately since then I've been finding out that in a lot of cases the people actually working with the computers aren't those actually doing the creative aspects, and to be perfectly honest from my experiences here at CG talk I'm not sure how well I'd be able to work with the sort of people naturally inclined to CG on a daily basis. So right about now I'm back to being completely uncertain, but until I come up with a better plan my drive for CG is simply that it's another medium for me to express myself through and I have nothing else to do.

InterFacer
05-27-2005, 02:30 AM
Haha...empath you sound like me :) I'm a 17 y/o who just finished his first year of college, and have seriously bounced around between upper level maths, art, and philosophy. It all kind of works together in my head, but I chose CG, or am in the process of choosing, because it seems to me the most effective way of creating the fantastic :)

OliveBeard
05-27-2005, 03:21 AM
I'm not sure I've ever truly "loved" CG. I started in game design (amateur) and skinning. Art classes were fun, but the objective was always "theoretical". Since then, I've always needed an objective to do art. Even then, its always been a process...

...I think what I've always loved is a challenge. I think that's why I'm also drawn to fixing, troubleshooting, and modifying computers/networks. Its a challenge. I think I just try and find the art in everything I do...and CG is a perfect merging of those worlds.

BTW, my name is Jacob. I've read CGTalk/Networks items for a long time, and initially only created an account to enter the M/S challenge...since then I felt it would be audacious of me to use CG like a cheap prostitute, and leave when I fulfilled my goal. There's a great network of artists on here, and I'd love to be a part of that; contest or no contest.

Thanks for reading.

Enayla: I agree on the "physical" medium. It sometimes good to get back to the "real" artwork (and printouts just don't do it!). Haven't put anything on a canvas for about 4 years now, but I'll be spending a summer in Europe (Germany, Ireland) away from my graphics tablet...so it looks like good ol' fashioned work for me!

Empath: There's a lot of "graphics designers" out there that are so named only because they can put elements together in Photoshop, Illustrator, or Quark; or create color seperations of images for T-Shirts and industrial-type metal stamps. These people make money, and work "entirely" in CG, but I wouldn't particularly label them artists. I think you'll find a lot of "artists" will perhaps have CG as a core medium, but are actually creative people and will happily utilize a variety of mediums to achieve there artistic objectives. Hang in there; they're not all bad. :)

JMBoekestein: I hear ya on CTRL-Z...and the History Toolbar as well. (Try and do that with acrylics!)

Greedo
05-27-2005, 03:51 AM
CG allows me to not only be creative, but u can also learn loads of stuff in all areas and it still helps in 3d!!

Empath
05-27-2005, 11:54 PM
Thanks for the responses; for me right now I'm not even certain of sticking with the medium, let alone a particular area within it. My dream job would be doing something along the lines of directing, be it in film, CG, as an artistic director, or whatever. Envisioning things and figuring out how to make them feasible is my greatest strength and what I enjoy doing the most; the actual creation process, for me, has always been secondary. I'm not particularly talented with any medium, be it writing, rendering, acting, or sketching, so making any choice is just impossibly daunting for me right now.:sad:

Faber
05-28-2005, 01:58 AM
first of all its my mind replicator. second, everything is possible in CG, which is an appealing asset to me :D

....now I just need to master dynamics, MEL, fluids, particles, paint effects..and a lot more, then i might be able to get some of this madness out :D

/kasper

Marc-OlivierBouchard
05-28-2005, 02:26 AM
Thanks for the responses; for me right now I'm not even certain of sticking with the medium, let alone a particular area within it. My dream job would be doing something along the lines of directing, be it in film, CG, as an artistic director, or whatever. Envisioning things and figuring out how to make them feasible is my greatest strength and what I enjoy doing the most; the actual creation process, for me, has always been secondary. I'm not particularly talented with any medium, be it writing, rendering, acting, or sketching, so making any choice is just impossibly daunting for me right now.:sad:

Edit\ I didn't read the first post you made so this interpretation of your intentions isn't accurate. Maybe it'll help someone anyway \Edit

Maybe I'm reading your intentions all wrong but you may be making a misguiding choice here by deciding to become a director because you feel you're not competent enough to work for one.
A director is someone that should be good at everything: writing, rendering, acting and sketching etc.
What a director doesn't need is to master everything.

adam17
05-29-2005, 06:37 PM
i find inspiration in almost anything. watching movies with lots of special effects, going outside and trying to recreate environments. sometimes ill have some strange and bizzare dreams and ill try to recreate those. its pretty simple.

yenvalmar
05-30-2005, 04:03 AM
i was always drawn to art, had computers not existed i would be a painter or sculptor, or even an animator still. and in fact i did all sorts of art in traditional media before i got a computer. but to me the digital media is exciting because there is simply no other way i can bring an entire world to life out of my head with the freedom i can in CG. the sacrifice you make is that it is not real. but neither is a film, really. its all just images on a screen.

now, if i had been really interested in becoming a painter instead of an animator, going digital might be more of a sacrifice.

also its cool because this is a new media without 300 years of art history. those of us trying to create fine art in the digital media are pioneers in a way you can't be with oil paint, and i think its a basic part of a lot of human's natures to be drawn to that.

as a number of other people have pointed out, for those of us who are drawn to artistic expression in general rather than a particular media, creating an all cg film is pretty much the controll freaks ultimate dream. you can be writer, director, wardrobe, talent, animator, every little thing is under your controll. to be competent at creating a finished 3d shot requires mastery of just about every other artistic media, animation, sculpting, painting, directing, lighting, design, and most likely quite a bit of nerdy tech stuff as well.

Lunatique
05-30-2005, 04:22 AM
Thanks for the responses; for me right now I'm not even certain of sticking with the medium, let alone a particular area within it. My dream job would be doing something along the lines of directing, be it in film, CG, as an artistic director, or whatever. Envisioning things and figuring out how to make them feasible is my greatest strength and what I enjoy doing the most; the actual creation process, for me, has always been secondary. I'm not particularly talented with any medium, be it writing, rendering, acting, or sketching, so making any choice is just impossibly daunting for me right now.:sad:

Not to be negative or anything, but the whole planet is full of people who have strong interests in things they aren't particularly good at--and that's why we have this thing called hobbies. The ones who are good at what they're interested in become professionals.

Being able to envision things isn't particularly unique--all children have imagination, and all creative people can envision things. Even average people have fantasies and can sit there daydreaming in fantastic detail. What makes you unique? What makes you better than the rest so that someone will give you a job doing what you want to do? How are you going to convince anyone that they should let you do anything unless you can prove that you are good at anything?

A director better have a good sense for writing and acting--since they are closely related. An art director has to be a good artist to begin with--how are you going to do that if you're not a good artist?

If you have a dream and a goal, you have to pay your dues. Everyone else is working their asses off to be good at what they do--you should do the same.

Empath
05-30-2005, 07:10 PM
Apparently I didn't express myself clearly, sorry. There's no need to respond to this, I just don't like leaving people with the wrong idea.
For starters, what I was trying to express by saying 'I'm not particularly good at anything,' was that I'm no more talented at any one thing than anything else. I have no particular skill at studying for or sitting through standardized tests, and yet I shattered my highschools records for PSAT and SAT scores. I'd never drawn anything more than stick figures before my first semester of college, and yet I just managed to ace every one of my drawing courses. I don't lack the ability to succeed at anything I apply myself to, I just don't have any PARTICULAR talents that might aid me in making a decision as to what I am going to apply my life to doing. Those things I'm truly not fit to do I've already crossed off my list of possibilities. And I've had dozens upon dozens of hobbies....
Directing is just one of many general ideas I'm tossing around, and one that seems most appealling at the moment. After about a year of acting, and helping out with every other aspect of stage production, I was approached with the opportunity to direct a play. Two days later I had the script memorized, every bit of choreography layed out with variations depending on how casting turned out, complete props and materials lists down to all the optional minor things, layouts of every set, designs for every flat, prop, and artistic element that needed to be created, rough schedule layouts, general ideas for costume design, lists of sound effects I'd need to find, lighting cues... everything. Unfortunately I never got the chance to actually use all of this, but I it was one of the more enjoyable things I've ever done, figuring out how to make it all work.
I'm perfectly willing and able to work my ass off; I just have TOO MANY dreams and goals, and only one life to fulfill a few of them in. And right now I'm at the point where I need to choose ONE to pursue.

Lunatique
05-31-2005, 04:50 AM
I just have TOO MANY dreams and goals, and only one life to fulfill a few of them in. And right now I'm at the point where I need to choose ONE to pursue.

Heh, in that case, you sound just like me. I do many creative things and I haven't been able to lock down on a solid career path either. But my ultimate goal has always been feature film directing.

Tom W.
05-31-2005, 06:25 AM
The women ;)

PatternRecognition
05-31-2005, 10:41 AM
Why do I love CG?

I lack patience. I have none of it whatsoever.

I can't stand something not going my way, messing up a perfectly good line with a frayed brush or something of the sort.

CG also gives you layers, multiple versions of your work, Ctrl+Alt+Z (and Ctrl+Shift+Z, respectively) and Wacoms! Yay for Wacoms!

Empath
05-31-2005, 04:54 PM
Heh, in that case, you sound just like me. I do many creative things and I haven't been able to lock down on a solid career path either. But my ultimate goal has always been feature film directing.
From the looks of your site you seem have your interests fairly well narrowed down, and having a clear final goal in mind I'd say you're well on your way to getting somewhere. :)

Squibbit
05-31-2005, 06:08 PM
The women ;)

lol

---

Avatar World War at Daily Sketch forum! (http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=245220)


.

Reality3D
05-31-2005, 06:25 PM
I love CG because it's the perfect mix/symbiosis between art and science.
I see here and there that it seems a lot of people uses cg only as a medium to reach a goal and to be honest I feel a bit sick with that way of thinking.I consider cg(the maths,physics,software engineering behind it etc..) by itself a goal too
From start to the end, I do love all CG

JeffB
05-31-2005, 11:18 PM
I use CG because it pays the bills.


Jeffrey Baker
Dancing Bear Graphics, Inc.

inlovewithlousypoetry
06-01-2005, 05:40 AM
I do CG...well basically because it came a lot easier for me than painting or drawing ever did. it was only after working on cg stuff that i was able to see things are shades and shapes... it is also condusive to the ADD nature i have

jmBoekestein
06-01-2005, 07:15 PM
I use CG because it pays the bills.


Jeffrey Baker
Dancing Bear Graphics, Inc.


Well that's a new one. :surprised Never heard of that happening. :bounce:

Grondhammar
06-01-2005, 07:20 PM
oi, yeah, it Makes me pay the bills...

TheClick
06-05-2005, 09:59 AM
In CG it is possible to make fancier creations of art with less effort and time. And it is easier t modify. And if modified, it is possible to keep the original and modify in many different ways.

I used to be really awestruck by neat Flash pages. Then I learned how they do it, and I'm just like, meh, whatever. I fiddle in flash here and there. The ones I'm referring to are artistically set up in the animation, or interface or whatever. FlashForward type of stuff.

And Next on the list is CGTalk type stuff. This I do not have the ability to do yet. So I am still dazzled by the stuff on this site. I began looking at stuff in Spectrum, then a few desgn studios' books in Borders, MetalHeart and such. Dave McKean -etc, then I discovered this site and it's on my life's to-do list.

aphexx
06-05-2005, 08:17 PM
cg arts have many advantages already mentioned in the posts above.

also one good advantage of computer graphics is, that you get much of the the lighting stuff for free (well..in 3d at least), if you are technically skilled.
it is far more complicated to try different lighting setups in a classic painting. it all has to be planned before, when you are painting in real.

also the whole scene is far more communicative and "free" than the classics.
the people are modern not because they do abstract arts, but they are free to do whatever they want...
in modern cg there is a big tendencie to choose motives that are kinda unusual and surreal or fictive, but not abstract! perhaps it is more naive or symbolic in some way. but this is accepted by every cg artist.

you can do whatever you want, and you always get accepted. no matter if you do classic motives fiction or any other stuff. all people love nearly all motives, when they are well done!!!

cg is what we always thought to be the future, because its is highly technically demanding concerning the software. and the communication is advanced.
- so you are struggling with high tech all day! and the way we all communicate is so overwhelming. in no time of mankind thinking, so many people who love the same thing, were able to exchange to each other (was this spelled right?)

cg is so lovely, the community all over the web is so amazing

Desert-of-Seth
06-06-2005, 11:00 AM
For me there's one main reason, i do it because i now have something to put my imagination in, a kind of a exhaust. I'm a dreamer and sometimes i get washed away in my own worlds. Thanks to CGI i now have a place to make bring those "worlds and ideas" to live. :)

The same thing goes with me too :) i also love CG cause it's more convenient compared to traditional media. I mean,you have millions of colours to use,no paint-buying is necessary :) and you can edit your picture;crop,resize,erase however you like,and the canvas never gets worse.

daw
06-07-2005, 01:20 AM
well, it's all about the timeline for me.
25 frames per sec! it takes time in old traditional way

these days you think "undo" when you do it the "analog" way...:scream:

drawdraw.com
06-07-2005, 09:10 PM
two words... undo button

mannix8
06-08-2005, 10:29 AM
cg is better because of speed and the ability to make changes/editing easier than the traditional media. For instance if you are painting a canvas using oil or pastel, if a client ask you to make major changes when you are already fininshed with the artwork; it would be difficult to make some changes but that is not a problem with cg as editing can be done in a matter of minutes and not days.

SpeccySteve
06-08-2005, 05:20 PM
I wouldn't say I "love cg" it's just another tool to use where it seems appropriate.

I got over the "wow! cool technology!" thing pretty quickly and now the main reason I use it is because large scale painting isn't really practical in a 1-bedroom flat.

Oh and not having to stink the flat out with funky chemical smells is nice too..

-Steve

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