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Madison
05-17-2005, 02:40 PM
Dear all,

I purchased about 5 books from Ballistic, they are amazingly good. ^_^ I'm a designer, and I'm planning to print some personal work out for my portfolio, the question is, how can I print the same quality as Ballistic's book?

Is there any tips or suggestion you can give me? I asked my local print shop and they would do it only if I print at least 500 copies. It will cost me a bomb and I don't need that many copies.

Any advise would be great.

Best regards,
Madison

Schwinnz
05-17-2005, 05:54 PM
There are a lot of places that do high quality laser printing. The big advantage is that you can make limited series. Render your stuff at 300 dpi or more (450, 600, 800, ++) and simply have it printed.

c-g
05-17-2005, 06:21 PM
First thing is don't go to a print shop that only print large runs of books. We do some large single prints here. I don't even know if you would even get a discount if you printed more. Look for a place like that.

**This isn't an advertisement**

What size prints are you looking at?
What are you looking to do with them? (mounting?)
What did you want it printed on?

eparts
05-17-2005, 07:18 PM
interresting thread.
would love to know more about this. I believe it goes for the same with printing posters.

c-g
05-17-2005, 07:49 PM
Anything I post here isn't specific to us...you can get this kind of stuff at other places.

We've done posters. :) We can print to a pretty wide variety of materials. Posters are usually done to photo paper. Most prints we do are printed on vinyl because it is more durable than paper and it is adhesive backed.

Ask the printer what kind of inks they use. Some inks don't hold up as well as others to different conditions.

Laminates will protect your print. If you are going to have anything that isn't sealed in a portfolio sleeve you might want to laminate it. There are a variety of those too.

Your art should determine what kind of print you want done. Ask what the printer offers, you might find out they can do something that might stand out in a stack of portfolios. We do a lot of trade show graphics so if you have gone to a tradeshow think about what the exhibitors have displayed.

One of the biggest things is knowing that this stuff is out there and available.

Madison
05-18-2005, 12:53 AM
Anything I post here isn't specific to us...you can get this kind of stuff at other places.

We've done posters. :) We can print to a pretty wide variety of materials. Posters are usually done to photo paper. Most prints we do are printed on vinyl because it is more durable than paper and it is adhesive backed.

Ask the printer what kind of inks they use. Some inks don't hold up as well as others to different conditions.

Laminates will protect your print. If you are going to have anything that isn't sealed in a portfolio sleeve you might want to laminate it. There are a variety of those too.

Your art should determine what kind of print you want done. Ask what the printer offers, you might find out they can do something that might stand out in a stack of portfolios. We do a lot of trade show graphics so if you have gone to a tradeshow think about what the exhibitors have displayed.

One of the biggest things is knowing that this stuff is out there and available.


Hi c -g,

I want to print around 20 - 30 A3 Size page, well the paper quality should be exactly the same as EXPOSE II's paper, could be slightly thicker. I don't think I will laminate it as I got a portfolio with A3 sleeves.

Do you accept overseas order? How much will it cost per page?

Best regards,
Madison Lee:D

ThePhotographer
05-18-2005, 01:13 AM
I do Epson ultrachrome inkjet prints which are guaranteed 75 years framed with glass. I use Ilford papers and a big socalled "tracer" which can make prints of 60 cm of large and as long as you want (30 m maximum).

Some artists have already had prints made here - one of them more than 30 quite big prints.

300 ppi is sufficient. What you print out always looks SO much better than what you see on your screen. So if you're already quite satisfied with what you see on your screen and provided that your screen is somewhat correctly calibrated, you should normally be very pleased with the prints.

I have an Ilford software which I find does a super job of dobbling the size of a print. For the photos, people don't even recognize that it's not silverprint. Currently, I only take about 15 Euros for a quite big print and give discounts for big numbers - also for for example 30 different images.

Similar things can of course be done on "normal size high quality" for examle Epson printers with Epson, Ilford or Fuji papers. The Ilford is very high quality, but I reckon that Epson and Fuji are also very good and they have a greater variety of paper types.

I would try to figure out if some photographer in the surroundings wouldn't have those facilities by coincidence. Many photographers have more and more digital facilities and would perhaps not ask you for 500 or more prints, but would do piece by piece. Exactly as I do myself.

This isn't an advertisment either ! Just to let you know what kind of services you should be able to get whereever you live. I'm sure that there must be some "smart" guys in HongKong doing these kind of things !

c-g
05-18-2005, 01:47 AM
Since we don't normally stock the paper it would be a special order. I know there are people closer to you that would do the same thing without the cost of international shipping.

Madison
05-18-2005, 02:09 PM
Dear The Photographer,

Thanks for your lovely reply, I'm really pleased that you let me know about your service. Sounds yummy, LOL. Though I started to look at some high quality A3 printer out there, as you know Hong Kong is a good place to buy electronic devices, cheap and good. :p

HP Deskjet 9800 is the one I'm looking, also the latest model ( HP Photosmart 9750 ). They do good quality stuff, so I will wait and see, of course need to save up. LOL


Thanks for your reply again

Best regards,
Madison

XenaTrek
05-18-2005, 02:31 PM
You probably already know this, prior to printing, have your artwork in the CYMK Mode as pose to RGB Mode.

XenaTrek

c-g
05-18-2005, 05:33 PM
Some print software will do a better conversion than photoshop because it knows what the printer is capable of doing. We sometimes feed out print software a L*A*B image because it actually likes that better. (Photoshop coverts to L*A*B in between RGB and CMYK)

XenaTrek
05-18-2005, 08:18 PM
Some print software will do a better conversion than photoshop because it knows what the printer is capable of doing. We sometimes feed out print software a L*A*B image because it actually likes that better. (Photoshop coverts to L*A*B in between RGB and CMYK)

That too. :o)
My Photoshop Instructor covered very little on LAB Conversion, and I forgot about it until c-g- mentioned it. Thx.

XenaTrek.

ThePhotographer
05-19-2005, 12:57 AM
I agree with c-g,

I NEVER use CMYK mode and I NEVER had any significant problems between PhotoShop and my Printer - an Epson Stylus Pro 7600. The printer software takes VERY good care of everything !

What I do nowadays, is to look at "printversion" and "printable colors" in the PhotoShop menues to check if I haven't used some "too far out colors" and then again, I feel quite confident that my printer will make a decent job.

I don't know what other experts as you c-g have to say about it, but I think that CMYK is mostly for REAL prints like books for example. With the sort of printer I have, there will always be a small difference - which I think is normal - between what you see on your monitor and what will get printed. But mostly it will be acceptable unless you're a real maniac and even then SOMETHING can still be done ....

c-g
05-19-2005, 02:32 AM
I don't know what other experts as you c-g have to say about it, but I think that CMYK is mostly for REAL prints like books for example. With the sort of printer I have, there will always be a small difference - which I think is normal - between what you see on your monitor and what will get printed. But mostly it will be acceptable unless you're a real maniac and even then SOMETHING can still be done ....

I wouldn't consider myself an expert. When I'm creating graphics (in illustrator) I use CMYK mode, if I do it in Photoshop I tend to start in RGB because it puts me in familiar ground since I'm only a print guy from 9-5. I try to get clients to stay in CMYK because it makes them get a little better preview of what the printer will do and I won't get the "it doesn't look like this on my screen". (PMS colors drive me nuts, I hate color matching)

overcontrast
05-21-2005, 02:01 PM
i donno if this is said before, but u can goto any digital photo printing shop and print your stuff. They print in really good quality. I think they do many size of prints like A4, A3... mayb A2..... and if u can get ur hand on a phto printer, then u can get some really good quality prints with those (quality depends on brands and prize of the printer)... hope this helps

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