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Darobat
04-29-2005, 11:32 PM
Greetings
I have a friend who is wanting to get into doing this sort of thing. He is expierenced in painting somewhat, and has artistic ability, but lacks direction when doing so in Photoshop. How do you get shading to look smooth? Just in general, just the basics on how to use the brushes to accomplish certain things that are easy when paining physicaly.

Also, is it completly necesary to download/make custom brushes, or will the orginal brushes suffice.

Oh, and what does the air brush tool do, as opposed to the normal brush. It seems to accomplish the same thing.

Thanks

jmBoekestein
04-30-2005, 09:35 AM
Getting started in digital art is like learning how wto ride a bike.
When you hit the ground you'll know you weren't moving fast enough.:)

Have him fiddle the knobs a little longer, when he can form an idea of what the software is capable of he'll have real questions to ask. There is the F1 button to use. You should definitely get this to an application specific forum, and I'm sure the thread'll be moved before long.

asongforOphelia
04-30-2005, 03:12 PM
I never had a use for downloaded brushes unless I wanted to do fun stuff. The original photoshop brushes are fine for me. I'm no expert though. :D

Studev
04-30-2005, 11:17 PM
Still darobat's question remain :

How to do a smooth shading ? I have already try this, fine, but not what i want. So far, there's no tutorial that is specificaly talk about shading in depth. get pretty frustated with it.

JMcWilliams
04-30-2005, 11:32 PM
Still darobat's question remain :

How to do a smooth shading ? I have already try this, fine, but not what i want. So far, there's no tutorial that is specificaly talk about shading in depth. get pretty frustated with it.

Use the line marque tool and mask out the section that you want to shade.... pick a soft big brush (the circle ones with the faded edges) and put the opacity down low. Paint into the masked area as per your requirements. If you try and get smooth shading by using small brushes then you might have difficulty, using a big soft brush will allow you to apply the brush stroke over a wide area, but only within the confines of the marque. (think of it as cutting out your own stencis, like real airbrush artists do)

The marque tools are located in the toolbar at the very top left, remember that if you hold down your mouse button on a toolbar icon that has a little arrow at the bottom right, then you can choose from some more variations for that type of tool. If you work in layers, you can auto marque a layers contents by CTRL + LEFT clicking on the layer (in the layers menu). Nice and quick.

wildsheepchase
04-30-2005, 11:37 PM
The simple version:
Block in your colors. Use a large brush with opacity set anywhere between 20-50% to block in shadows and highlights. Go back into those areas with increasingly smaller brushes and lighter opacities to shade and get smoother transitions. Experiment with different brushes.

It takes a lot of practice and experimentation. One thing I still struggle with is not going for the small detail brushes early in the painting. You need to get those large shadows and shapes blocked in first. Start large and work your way down to the details. Hope that helps.

Studev
05-01-2005, 12:13 AM
Will take both of these advice seriously. Especially from large to details.

Thanks

JA-forreal
05-01-2005, 01:03 AM
Greetings
I have a friend who is wanting to get into doing this sort of thing. He is expierenced in painting somewhat, and has artistic ability, but lacks direction when doing so in Photoshop. How do you get shading to look smooth? Just in general, just the basics on how to use the brushes to accomplish certain things that are easy when paining physicaly.

Also, is it completly necesary to download/make custom brushes, or will the orginal brushes suffice.

Oh, and what does the air brush tool do, as opposed to the normal brush. It seems to accomplish the same thing.

Thanks

It's been ages since I've done any serious illustration with 2d software. But my old way was too start with separate layers using vector drawing tools to block out my detail shapes and color shades. I saved my final vector drawings as a base for future image alterations. Then I merged and rastorized everything into one layer. I duplicated this layer and started painting on my new layer. Now I began to blend tones, mid tones, shadows and highlights with my tools. My list of drawing tools used were, the smudge tool, burn, dodge, blur, airbrush, clone and the pencil. I used any technique that worked.

You can find many specific 2d drawing tutorials on the web that work like this. Don't underestimate the “Anime” drawing tutorials, they can teach you the basics of these 2d software drawing techniques. You can create simple toon drawings with this process to gallery quality masterpieces. Once you get down the process you can get out any classical drawing book and practice drawing emulating the physical drawing methods of paint and charcoal that you see as your guides. But you will have more control over your artwork on a computer, you know with the saving, layers and undo button. CG production. You gotta love it.

If you have a good “4x5” drawing tablet you won't have to waste the trees and you can set you goals on painting up a cool T-shirt or poster image for printing. Save like a mad man or woman while you work. I hope this helps your friend.

x_wolf19
05-01-2005, 08:51 PM
Id start with a quick, rough sketch that gets the idea down, and the depth, (light and dark) then scan it, go into PS (Used to use painter, LORDIE is PS ever easier for me to use well) block in your large colors (i start with darkest of that particular color first) then start putting in your hlight colors. Start large and messy, tighten up as you go along. smaller brushes, lighter colors as said above. I like to use the color dodge and burn sometimes too. Keep in mind learning how light works in the real world, and how to bend those rules is an important skill to own as well. Most importantly....KEEP WORKING AT IT. It'll get to a point where its really fun, and then you won't wanna stop....thats wherei 'm at right now :)

cheers

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