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View Full Version : Painter Blending tips and advice wanted


sylia
04-18-2005, 01:36 PM
Hi, I started using painter a year ago and since then I've only used the Grainy Water and Just Add Water Blenders for most of my pieces but I don't feel really used to them and still find traditional methods easier for me.
I'd appreciate if anyone would share their experiences regarding blending in painter to help a traditional painter love the magic of painter.

and please, excuse me for my lousy English.

kind regards,

A. Limas

pushav
04-18-2005, 03:35 PM
Alright here we go. First of all, just find what ever brush you with to use as a blender in painter (such as the oil pastel brush) then find you brush options (if on painter 8 and 9 press ctrl+b or if your on an older version of painter, it should be the green menus to the upper right part of your screen. You should come across a feature called well. Click on well and there should be slider bars with Resat (the amount of paint you would like on your brush) Bleed (this is the amount of pressure that your brush uses when painting. think of this a real life paintbrush painting pressue) and Dryout (this controls the dryout level on the brush)

Usually I normally turn the resat all the way down to 0 so no paint will come off of my brush so I can blend colors together. But you can play around with different levels to find what works for you. And also a wacom tablet is a great investment when using a program like this.

I hope that I was of some help to you.

dbclemons
04-18-2005, 05:18 PM
I don't have the newer version, but in v7 there's a nice brush called Tinting (the icon has a brush over the three primary colors) that has a Blender which works much like the Just add Water, but includes a grain control. The Photo Brush also has a Diffuse Blur that works well for smoothing areas together with a bit of noise.

I tend to prefer painting my blends rather than blurring them, if that makes any sense. It's an approach of painting in a color that's somewhere between the two ranges, and then smoothing the edges. I also like to do a sort of glazing with different opacity levels. I think it makes the blend more natural looking instead of having that "digital" look.

Working on Layers is also a good idea so you can make adjustments to them separately.
-David

sylia
04-18-2005, 10:19 PM
Thanks a lot dbclemons (member.php?u=17578) and pushav (member.php?u=43396) :thumbsup:
I'll try that out asap.
I agree on the tablet thing, I have a Intuos 2 since I've worked as graphic designer for the last 2 years and it was a life saver for my work. But I did't try actually painting with it until some months ago.

Jinbrown
04-18-2005, 10:21 PM
sylia,

Since we don't know which Painter version you're using, it makes it a bit more difficult to answer questions, so if you can include that info in future posts, i'tll help.

Most artists coming from traditional media (and many who don't come from that background) seem to like adjusting the Resat (Resaturation), Bleed, and Dryout sliders for the brush variant they're using to paint, rather than using the preset Blenders variants (Painter 8 and Painter IX)/Liquid variants (Painter 6 and Painter 7)/Water variants (Painter 5/5.5). If the brush variant is used that way a lot, a custom brush variant can be saved with a new name not already used by Painter so you don't need to make adjustments all the time.

You'll find these controls in:

Painter IX - The Brush Creator, Stroke Designer tab's Well section, the Brush Controls' Well palette, and, with the exception of the Dryout slider, on the Property Bar

Painter 8 - The Brush Creator, Stroke Designer tab's Well section and, with the exception of the Dryout slider, on the Property Bar

Painter 7 - In the Brush Controls palette's Well section. On the Controls: Brush palette, by default only the sliders for Size, Opacity, Grain are displayed. You can add the Well section controls to the Controls: Brush Palette, too:

Go to the Brushes palette's Control menu and choose Custom Controls.

In the Customize Controls Palette dialog box, choose Well from the Category drop down list.

Under Available Controls, check the boxes for Resaturation, Bleed, Dryout, and Brush Loading, then click the OK button. Now the Well section controls are added to the right side of the Controls: Brush palette.

Painter 5/5.5 and Painter 6 - In the Brushes palette's Control menu and choose Well. On the Controls: Brush palette, by default only the sliders for Size, Opacity, Grain are displayed. You can add the Well section controls to the Controls: Brush Palette, too:

Go to the Brushes palette's Control menu and choose Custom Controls.

In the Customize Controls Palette dialog box, choose Well from the Category drop down list.

Under Available Controls, check the boxes for Resaturation, and Bleed, Dryout (Brush Loading not available in this version), then click the OK button. Now the Well section controls are added to the right side of the Controls: Brush palette.


It would be a good idea to spend some time reading your User Guide or Help > Help Topics to learn more about using the brush controls and what each control really does.

.........

sylia
04-18-2005, 10:51 PM
Ooops I'm so sorry. I have painter IX.

sylia
04-18-2005, 11:00 PM
Jinbrown (member.php?u=3631) thanks a lot for your advice. I agree with you I should spent some time reading about brush controls and brush creator. I read a couple of books on Painter and some parts of the huge user guide but when start painting with painter I get too carried away with so many options and brushes that I feel as if I've forgotten everything I've read on the matter,

Jinbrown
04-19-2005, 07:29 AM
sylia,

Thanks for clearing up which Painter version you're using. :)

One way to make reading the User Guide or Help > Help Topics (basically the User Guide in online format with Search and bookmark capabilities) is to refer to it when you're doing something in particular and questions come up in your mind, ones that don't have to be answered right away, but would boost you learning if they were answered. If you're using the hard copy User Guide, keep it nearby so you can easily reach for it. Then use Post-It Notes to mark pages you'll need to go back to later. In Help > Help Topics, use the Favorites tab to bookmark pages you'll need to go back to later.

Another thing that will help, both when communicating here and when looking things up in the User Guide or Help > Help Topics is to:

Go to the Help menu and click Show Tool Tips. If it says Hide Tool Tips you don't need to click, they're already enabled.

Now take a few minutes now and then to hold your cursor over things (it'll take a few seconds and you need to hold your cursor very still) until that item's name is displayed. That will help you become familiar with the terms that (should) match what you'll see in the User Guide or Help > Help Topics.

Some examples are:

The icon/button at the bottom of the Colors palette that looks like a rubber stamp. That's not the name of it, though, so looking up "rubber stamp" won't do much good.

The two drop down lists at the top of the Layers palette that are not labeled. Hold your cursor over the center of those drop down windows (for lack of a better name) to have the name display.

The six icons/buttons on the left side, bottom of the Layers palette are not labeled and you'll be using them frequently once you know what they're for. The trash can icon/'button on the right side, bottom is pretty self explanatory but you can check the name of that one too.

In the Brush Creator, Stroke Designer Tab and in the Brush Controls' palettes, there are drop down lists for Expression. In the General palette, for instance, there are two, one for Opacity and the other for Grain. To the right of those Expression drop down lists are small boxes and eventually, if not sooner, you'll need to know what they are and what they do.

Another thing that makes using Custom Palettes easier is that we can hold the cursor over a brush category icon in the Custom Palette to learn it's name in case we have a lot of brush category icons in that Custom Palette and don't remember by looking at them what they are. While the default brush category icons may be fairly easy to remember, when we begin creating custom brush categories and they collect over a few years, it's not so easy to remember all of them and knowing the name helps a lot.


Any time you want to know what something is named, try that and if nothing displays, then you can ask us but most times there will be a name displayed.

sylia
04-19-2005, 07:55 PM
Jinny, thanks you very much for your info and advice.
I'm rather familiar with layers and the like since I'be been working in graphic design for a couple of years, being PS Freehand & Quark my tools of the trade at work. But I have never used PS as a "painting" tool for my paintings and illustrations, relying mainly in traditional methos or vectors.

Jinbrown
04-20-2005, 03:13 PM
sylia,

No matter how familiar one might be with Photoshop or other programs, Painter is just enough different to make it necessary to learn what things are named, where they are, and how they function.

Photoshop users are constantly wanting to know how to do something in Painter they know well how to do in Photoshop. There's no way around it, they are two different programs. ;)

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