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ashakarc
04-16-2005, 06:01 AM
>>

Not to make any assumptions here, just innocently loaded questions! (wink)

You, the artist: Do you get moved by world events that urge you to paint?
Do you think that you should be?
Does it really matter?

Marc-OlivierBouchard
04-16-2005, 06:25 AM
I think they matter.

I'm influenced not by the really latest but more from the general mood of the world events.
Because (or so I believe) everything goes around in cycles, I uncounsciously tend to act with the trends.
Ex: Scary world event, people are scared, authorities excert more and more order, I tend to naturally react by chaos.
Cycle then breaks because of people want more freedom. Government more leanient, social mood becomes frivolous. I then tend to get stricter, more moralistic etc.

I'm sure it's like this for a lot a people involved in creation. You feel a need to protect your
"individuality"
(But are we really unique individuals? blah blah blah)

nunz
04-16-2005, 11:35 AM
I think it's important for some artists to get involved in world events. After all, the artwork from ancient tribes had to have some kind of influence in them. It's all about history. Artists have the ability to express and tell stories...

Personally, I've created political artwork, though it wasn't very meaningful or inspired.

jmBoekestein
04-17-2005, 11:49 PM
Well I don't particularly paint. But yes, the overall state of the world influences my approach on things and my motivation.

I think it's the right thing yes, You can reach alot of people with these media we use. And that requires some responsibility. If you don't accept that one way or the other it will get back at you and kick you in the arse so to speak.

Tryn
04-18-2005, 12:07 AM
1) not directly. I like to keep my artistic/fantasy realms inside my head distinctly separate from the other reality(I've let the line blur before, and I find I can't function very well in the real world :) ).

2) Perhaps its selfish, but I don't particularly like knowing who's killing who. Don't get me wrong, I'm very much a pacifist, but not in the protest rally kind of way. My philosophy is that if everyone kept their own backyard clean, we wouldn't have problems.

3)(If I understand the question correctly) Certainly it matters. But an artist doesn't have to deliberately set out to inspire, or rally, etc. We might not be able to stop a war, but I think if someone slows for a minute to observe your art and thinks about it, you've succeeded.

Goldee Lox
04-18-2005, 12:21 AM
Not that urge me to paint, but to create worlds, yes indeed. It seems to me that NOT reflecting on your contemporary world is, if not strange, then at least desaturative to your works, they lose their immediacy. This is absolutely not a molotov to those that do not reflect, but merely knots up to MY work.

But to anchor them solely in today can lead to a certain moth-ness, you know, those one-day-lives that are drawn to flame(?what the.. am i talking about?), i.e. they are forgotten once the topic is off the news. But to spot certain patterns that adhere to both old and new contexts, that is one of the aspects of art that can lead to timelessness.

The worlds that I create in these moments are sketchy, based around one problem or factor, such as gender and religion. Politics is another one of my favourites.

The funny thing is, that as soon as the discussion on the news dies out, I'm rapidly growing tired of the subject, usually in the middle of fine tuning. Oh, irony...

csDevil
04-18-2005, 03:03 AM
I think that art is a way to view the world, no matter what kind of art. And viewing is so dynamic that people change every fact in their lives. But this should not be too explicit in any artwork, so it can be much more abstract and give the viewer more ways to read art. To change with the world is a good thing, so you wouldn't be frozen in time.
On the other side, there are works that are SO great that they'll be recognized as great no matter what year. The artist gets not only what is happening with the world or the human at that time, but what goes on in every human, in any year.

Stahlberg
04-18-2005, 07:12 AM
1. You're right, it's a loaded question, impossible to answer yes or no, like "Have you stopped beating your wife?".
"Do you get moved by world events that urge you to paint?" No world event has ever urged me to paint and none ever will - rather, they make me want to stop painting and go find a useful profession like foreign aid-worker - but of course I do get moved by them.
2. Since it's a continuance of 1, equally impossible to answer yes or no. No, I don't think I should be urged to paint by world events, because I can think of no more pathetic and useless way of trying to change things or whatever it is I would be trying to do by that, than to push pixels around on a screen. To me it defeats the purpose of art, making it either boring, offensive, juvenile, naive, almost instantly obsolete, or all of the above. (That's just me, but you asked.)
3. Does anything really matter?

ashakarc
04-18-2005, 09:41 AM
1. You're right, it's a loaded question, impossible to answer yes or no, like "Have you stopped beating your wife?".
"Do you get moved by world events that urge you to paint?" No world event has ever urged me to paint and none ever will - rather, they make me want to stop painting and go find a useful profession like foreign aid-worker - but of course I do get moved by them.
2. Since it's a continuance of 1, equally impossible to answer yes or no. No, I don't think I should be urged to paint by world events, because I can think of no more pathetic and useless way of trying to change things or whatever it is I would be trying to do by that, than to push pixels around on a screen.
I think this is part of the dilemma of contemporary art and its supposed role at least from a historical perspective, as an instrument, an ontological one. The magnitude of world events trivializes everything we do as artists, and art by itself becomes an impotent instrument for life. The sense of powerlessness towards reasonable explanation of what is happening eventually creates a Will to detach the self from Being. I can see your point and sadly share the same cynical attitude but to the instrument of art. The question however, is that if art has lesser means to react/express, does it have to have a role anymore? Is this a failure of the artists to absorb life or humanity to accept the right of life?

To me it defeats the purpose of art, making it either boring, offensive, juvenile, naive, almost instantly obsolete, or all of the above. (That's just me, but you asked.)
You've just touched on an exposed nerve. I am not really sure what is the purpose of art anymore, or is it a fair question to ask at all!


3. Does anything really matter?
Hmm.. welcome to existentialism ;)

Stahlberg
04-18-2005, 06:31 PM
Well, I think everyone has their own answer to what is art, and what is it's purpose. As for me, it's to 'lift me up', to tickle my aesthetic sense, but more than that.... As someone once said, "Art is that which makes us proud to be human". I also think the purpose sometimes can be to simply entertain. Entertainment has a bad rep in art critique circles, I don't think it deserves it. It ain't easy to make successfully, and the best of it probably is one of the few things in life that keeps a lot of us sane...

The biggest problem with creating art based on what we learn from media (even if it's those supposedly more truthful and impartial - lol - alternative sources), is that we can't trust that the information we have is correct, or if most of it is, but some isn't, which part is wrong, or if the conclusions are wrong, etc etc... (In fact we can trust it... we can trust it to be full of errors, over-simplifications and exaggerations.)
To make a succesful work of art you need to take a stand on an issue, but as soon as you do that, you run the risk of being wrong. The stronger and more emotional your stand, the bigger the chance that you're drifting away from the truth of the matter. Reality is always more complex than we think. There's always another higher level of detail to be discovered, another layer which when peeled back, reveals some slight modifications to the preceding one.

Giving a full and unbiased picture of any issue or event would require total lack of emotion and huge amounts of detail. It would make for a very boring work of art.

eparts
04-18-2005, 10:36 PM
i often get inspired to paint from atleast the world around me, people, beliefs and so on. I get very inspired by people and their image of reality. this can be lo-church religious people, kids, myself, politicians and whatever.

recently I've had images in mind I know is inspired by highschool shooting episodes, such as the shooting at Red Lake High School, MN. I am not sure if I want to express my feelings and opinions around this because its a very fragile subject..and no one knows much about it, even if they read the news. I could be easily misunderstood. I keep my pencilsketches for myself for now.

If I should be this, is a hard question. If im supposed to be an artist, this is good. but i am a highschool student with fantasies which perhaps are unacceptable, because i dont have the "title" artist.

If it matters? does everything around you matter? if something matters, you care. as artist, i believe you do something about it

Marc-OlivierBouchard
04-18-2005, 11:00 PM
Stahlberg:Well, I think everyone has their own answer to what is art, and what is it's purpose. As for me, it's to 'lift me up', to tickle my aesthetic sense, but more than that.... As someone once said, "Art is that which makes us proud to be human". I also think the purpose sometimes can be to simply entertain. Entertainment has a bad rep in art critique circles, I don't think it deserves it. It ain't easy to make successfully, and the best of it probably is one of the few things in life that keeps a lot of us sane...

The biggest problem with creating art based on what we learn from media (even if it's those supposedly more truthful and impartial - lol - alternative sources), is that we can't trust that the information we have is correct, or if most of it is, but some isn't, which part is wrong, or if the conclusions are wrong, etc etc... (In fact we can trust it... we can trust it to be full of errors, over-simplifications and exaggerations.)
To make a succesful work of art you need to take a stand on an issue, but as soon as you do that, you run the risk of being wrong. The stronger and more emotional your stand, the bigger the chance that you're drifting away from the truth of the matter. Reality is always more complex than we think. There's always another higher level of detail to be discovered, another layer which when peeled back, reveals some slight modifications to the preceding one.

Giving a full and unbiased picture of any issue or event would require total lack of emotion and huge amounts of detail. It would make for a very boring work of art.


I think it is the accumulation of incomplete and biased world views that gives us an understanding of how complex the world is.
If no one ever bothered to express a politicial, social, religious etc. point of view through art, we'd have a rather self centered view of the world's issues. I try to approach a blank medium with in mind not the fear to be wrong but the belief that I don't know the thruth.

I think some cannibal prince one said:
The more art you see, the more your black and white perception of the world blends to gray.

Kanga
04-18-2005, 11:50 PM
I always thought art should make the world a better place.

You know bring a little light in.
I got really interested in current affairs when I was 15 and read everything I could until I discovered a pattern. I also notied that bad news sells and I was getting a very nastily lopsided view on mankind,... so I stopped. Alot of media coverage which is handled in a hollywood maner makes many of us gloomy to say the least. The world is made up of good stuff too though.

I don't do it myself but an artist who tries to tap into the times he lives in in a positive way isn't a bad thing. I don't mean killing a cow on the steps of the city art gallery. I have seen some really good contemporary art.

My personal direction takes all my time but I must admit,...
I usually go to sleep with the BBC chanting softly next to my pillow.

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