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cammy_jade
04-11-2005, 09:40 PM
having received enough information, the thread starter has moved on. thank you.

ivanisavich
04-12-2005, 03:35 AM
Here's a couple of things to remember:

1) If nothing else, make sure your story has a great hook. No potential producer is even going to glance at your script if they're not taken by the hook.

2) Being given direction rights for your script probably isn't going to happen. Chances are that even if a producer is willing to dish out some cash to produce your movie, they're not going to risk handing over the production to a virgin director (assuming this would be your first time directing).

Good luck!

spinnage
04-12-2005, 03:56 AM
Well, if you're truly passionate about the project, then do it yourself. Don't wait for Hollywood to get it wrong...otherwise, I assume you're interested in this industry for the money and you suffer from dreams of californication, so plan to wait in line for a very very long time.

I suggest you pick up a copy of Robert Rodriguez's "Rebel Without a Crew," and follow your heart---get your film out on the festival circuit, kick-ass, and then you'll be in a position to negotiate.

Good luck and best wishes,

cammy_jade
04-12-2005, 04:29 AM
Being given direction rights for your script probably isn't going to happen.



i see, but now i realize that i typed that part differently from my thoughts. i already have a picture of how i want most of the scenes to look, which came out in the sentence "i want to direct it". i am a virgin director so i know i will definitely be unable to do this without an experienced person guiding me through it, which is what i meant by "i won't refuse help from an actual director".

despite the sights i already have, will my lack of experience overrule and make the direction rights nonnegotiable? in a better sentence, even without direction rights, can i hang around and keep the foundation of my story or will i lose all power [the director can completely change my screenplay]? i realize what you said is right, but in hopes i still ask...

cammy_jade
04-12-2005, 04:39 AM
Well, if you're truly passionate about the project, then do it yourself.



do you mean independent film? that's what i've been considering because i'm not for all the hollywood attention and tv spots. if that's not what you meant, can you give me pointers on how? because i'm not well budgeted and am a newbie. i doubt i can find a director nice enough to direct but let me have my say [exchange thoughts and come to agreements like partners]...

spinnage
04-12-2005, 06:41 AM
Yeah, an independent film is what I meant....back in the days before hollywood, when film was a new technology, every filmmaker was an independent...but then the hollywood system developed and movies became expensive primarily to weed out any competition. eventually the hollywood style evolved, and now, its hard to imagine a film that doesn't adhere to the rules and conventions devoloped by hollywood. independents had a hard time competing because of the cost factor and distribution limitations (the studios owned a good chunk of the theaters!!)

but now, a new revolution is taking place. digital cinema and animation are now very affordable, and if you master the technology, you can do near-hollywood quality output for a fraction of the cost. the web is creating an interesting new avenue for distribution.

films will always cost money to make, but if you're careful, you can do it effectively on a shoestring. check out www.kazeghostwarrior.com by timothy albee for inspiration. he wrote an excellent book on independent animation called "CGI Filmmaking."

there are so many people trying to break into the film industry--imagine millions trying to squeeze through one little door frame. the ones who are truly successful seem to be the ones who ante up and get that first film made--otherwise, at best, you will have to be comfortable working on someone else's film or, even as a writer, you will have to write and rewrite, or work with a team to produce a bland piece of nonsense that favors well with focus groups. working on someone else's film is great for some people, but not for others.

if anything, by making your own film, you'll learn what it takes to make a film...either you'll love it, or you'll hate it. or maybe you'll find one aspect of filmmaking that you like more than all the rest, and you'll want to look for a job in that area. i think though, that if you chase hollywood with just a script and a dream then, you'll always be chasing. you want hollywood to come to you. don't take my word for it though, check out some of the books i've suggested. who knows, you could get lucky and sell that script to a producer or studio or whatever....but from what I understand, you could also get lucky and win the lottery.

oh, and don't worry about trying to make your film "right". there's no right way to make a film (i.e. first script, then storyboards, then whatever, blah blah)--that's hollywood nonsense. do what it takes to make it--all that matters is the final product--no one's gonna care if you followed all the steps outlined in "filmmaking 101," or whatever some book or class says.

cammy_jade
04-12-2005, 10:22 PM
then an independent film i'll chase instead. it's sad that many people work hard to come up with plots and have no say whatsoever on their story when hollywood takes it. they take your work, but not you. [director rights]

there's no right way to make a film

a lot of agents are very cranky that's why i'm treading very lightly with the "rules". thanks for that tip, though and all the other information. but what ivanisavich said was right, so i don't think i should have asked those other questions about director's rights. i just did in a dreamer's sense that maybe i'll be told what i want to hear. i'd like to delete that, it was very naive.

before asking any more questions i'll do some searches on how independent films work. the main thing i want are director's rights.

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