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macievelli
04-07-2005, 10:19 AM
First, I must say I love the idea of this forum. Kudos to the mods...such a great surprise, even among this fantastic site. I find myself coming here more and more, as daunting and humbling an experience as it is.

Struggling with my insomnia, I wanted to post some things. Perhaps they will be of some value to beginning artists, at the very least I hope this will be an interesting read.

I've been an artist all my life. I started sellign my work commercially while in the 7th grade. I'm now 38. I have always worked as an artist...sometimes as a "purist" (as during my time as an apprentice and then porcelain sculptor), and sometime as an art whore (as art director for a couple of ad agencies)...whatever it took to keep the outlet open for my creativity. In the course of devoting one's life to a creative pursuit, you have to make sacrifices, right? I know many of you know exactly what I'm talking about. It keeps getting better and hopefully so does my work. I have worked with digital media as a profession since 1983, but continue to work with several forms of more traditional media. I am completely self taught in both forms, except for my time at the aformentioned sculpture studio.

Throughout the course of my work on computers I have developed a philosophy I use as a catalyst for my work: Design beyond media. At its core, this means creating outside the boundaries of any particular medium of delivery; That one should be as comfortable working in one form as another, utilizing whatever tool the idea necessitates. The idea should control the tool, not the other way around.

It became apparent to me at some point that creativity crossed the boundaries of whatever tool/media I used; That elements of many different forms of expression combine during the course of a work. This is particularly true with digital art, whether it is CG, 3D, 2d, etc. No matter how advanced the technology or the tool, a foundation of solid design fundamentals is essential! This realization led to the philosophy of designing beyond media as not only a paradigm for my career, but a focus for my traditional work as well.

Consequently, this seemingly apparent fact is perhaps the most common error I see among digital artists; Software knowledge does not an artist make. (This certainly is not the case with the majority of the fantastic artists who frequent this site, which is why I keep coming back here. I am amazed that such expression can be found in one place online. CGTalk is truly the Louvre of the web, the Online Guggenheim, if you will.) I refer mainly to the vast majority of those who own software that draws, paints, etc. 3D modeling/rendering seems to be one medium that this does not apply to. I suppose that it stems from the learning curves, devotion one must have, etc., to work well in 3D. I am a relative newcomer to 3D, having only worked in it for two years. I have much to learn. But I am learning much, thanks to this site. Whenever I start feeling like I am exceptional, I come here and it brings me back to reality. SO MUCH TALENT HERE! It is inspiring.

In closing, I will add one little phrase that keeps my head in the right place when I hit a roadblock:

Where science and technology fail, ART survives.

Thank you for taking time to read this. I hope you feel it was not wasted.

cok3
04-07-2005, 11:04 AM
thanks for the inspiring read macievelli.

jmBoekestein
04-07-2005, 11:28 AM
Very interesting. I had to go through my waking up jousts with life and found this very interesting.
Specifically you referring to 3D as 3D, and 2D as 2d. Though I don't mean to say that I think to 2D is bad, I'mmjust a little 3D junky.

Good luck in learning 3D, it's fun I've also only been at it for a year or two. But the same goes for my drawing. Still full of baby diseases.:)

macievelli
04-07-2005, 03:05 PM
THanks for the comments. I agree with you Jim B., I've become very addicted to 3D. I know in my heart that it is the medium of delivery that will carry me for the next 10-20 years, just as I knew that web design would carry me through the last 10, and it did, as a primary income source.

Having started as a sculptor, then moved into digital (where I stayed) finding 3D has been like returning to my roots. There is no other expression on a computer that comes so close to sculpting. It is essentially identical at the modeling stage. Only the tools are different; the mental processes are so close.

I don't know about the rest of you, but 3D work seems like the pinnacle of creativity on these damn machines. It is a confluence of so many other media! It's everything all thrown together to make one work. I don't know of anything else that requires so much from an artist. To paint you dont need to be a photographer or a sculptor. To sculpt you dont need to be a painter or an engineer. In 3D, you must draw, paint, image edit, create textures, photograph, sculpt, engineer.....so many areas that come to gether to make a great work. I have the most respect for those who have mastered this craft. It incorporates so many elements.

jmBoekestein
04-07-2005, 08:09 PM
I totally agree with you!

The funky thing I found is that one other medium gets close to the speed cg 3d develops at(because new things are constantly found because it encompasses so much), and that's film. So vfx it was for me. I love it. I bet I'll be doing 3d and 2d just with computers for the rest of my life besides sudden fancies and flights of inspiration.:love:

adam-crockett
04-07-2005, 08:47 PM
I don't know about the rest of you, but 3D work seems like the pinnacle of creativity on these damn machines. It is a confluence of so many other media! It's everything all thrown together to make one work. I don't know of anything else that requires so much from an artist. To paint you dont need to be a photographer or a sculptor. To sculpt you dont need to be a painter or an engineer. In 3D, you must draw, paint, image edit, create textures, photograph, sculpt, engineer.....so many areas that come to gether to make a great work. I have the most respect for those who have mastered this craft. It incorporates so many elements.

This is exactly why this artform has captivated me. I cant settle on a medium, I love them all. Drawing, painting, sculpting, photography, etc. 3D really brings them all together. I can still do all those things I love, but they are all channeled into this one overall project. If you are doing an animated short film then you get to wear even more hats. Writer, animator, musician, editor, lighting, etc. Every traditional art I do now seems like it is just leading up to the bigger picture, which is the 3d animation that brings it all together.

Addicted!

slaughters
04-08-2005, 10:37 PM
...There is no other expression on a computer that comes so close to sculpting. It is essentially identical at the modeling stage. Only the tools are different; the mental processes are so close.Think of the modeling stage as sculpting and the lighting and composition stage as photography. I've always thought that texturing is more closely related to clothing/interior design work than it is to painting though.

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