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paperclip
04-07-2005, 12:32 AM
William Bouguereau's techniques:

Click here (http://www.artrenewal.org/museum/b/Bouguereau_William/mark_walker1.asp#)

and

Prud'hon here (http://www.art.net/~rebecca/OnPrudon1.html) (very good; a step-by-step reenactment!)

Any other technique pages by wonderful artists? Post them here!

Edited to include other links/references by posters:

Sargent's notes:

Click here. (http://http://pedrosanz.typepad.com/home/files/sargent_notes.pdf) (PDF: right-click & save-as.)
Notes may also be found here (http://www.goodbrush.com/misc/painting_lessons/sargent_notes.pdf).

Creative Illustration - By Andrew Loomis (Available online for free. Download this if you are serious about art in any way at all. This is THE art instruction bible for many years, and is still very good even today.)
Click (http://www.saveloomis.com/) here.


Books:


Alla Prima: Everything I know About Painting-- By Richard Schmid

Timeless Techniques for Better Oil Paintings-- By Tom Browning

Harley Brown's eternal truths for every artist - By Harley Brown & Lewis Barrett Lehrman
Johnannes Itten - 'The Art of Color',

'The Elements of Color' (less expensive)

Edited by Jurg Spiller:
a) 'Paul Klee Notebooks Volume 1 The Thinking Eye',
b) 'Paul Klee Notebooks Volume 2 The Nature of Nature'

Burne Hogarth's books

Kimon Nicholades 'the natural way to draw' - awesome but require very serious commitment (300 hrs)

Gary Faigain 'The Artists Complete Guide to Facial Expression'
'The Illusion of Life' by Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas (two of the legendary 'nine old men' from the Disney studio)
I'll update the links as time goes by. Keep adding to it!

SpeccySteve
04-07-2005, 02:15 AM
Sargent notes on painting, someone sent me this ages back but this is the first online linky I found.

No idea about authenticity, have a read anyway and discard ..or not.

http://pedrosanz.typepad.com/home/files/sargent_notes.pdf

paperclip
04-08-2005, 11:00 AM
Sargent's notes cause my internet browser to crash. You sure that's the correct page?

jmBoekestein
04-08-2005, 11:29 AM
right-click and save as should work there. It's the location of a pdf file. Maybe you need to install acrobat reader, but that wouldn't be the case I think.

theCloudmover
04-08-2005, 11:29 AM
Thanks for the Sargent notes link.

Man, what it would have been like to have HIM as a teacher.

Lunatique
04-09-2005, 03:55 AM
One thing I've noticed about online material on art techniques is that they are usually not in depth, and aren't nearly as useful or helpful as published books.

Here are some of the best I own:
Alla Prima: Everything I know About Painting-- By Richard Schmid

Timeless Techniques for Better Oil Paintings-- By Tom Browning

Harley Brown's eternal truths for every artist - By Harley Brown & Lewis Barrett Lehrman

Creative Illustration - By Andrew Loomis (Available online for free. Download this if you are serious about art in any way at all. This is THE art instruction bible for many years, and is still very good even today.)


Books can be expensive, especially art books. I have many art books that cost about $100 USD each or more, but they are worth every penny. You simply can't find equivalent of them online.

paperclip
04-09-2005, 10:02 AM
Lunatique:
Could you describe the books you told us about? What sort of things do they cover? I ask because I'm rather poor and can only afford a couple of these books. They look as if they cover general technique rather than any particular aspect, would that be right?
Does each book focus on a different area of art?
Thanks for posting that list, very helpful.
I'm working my way through 'creative illustration' right now. Such a good book, isn't it? Any chance we could try and get it re-published? Maybe through Ballistic books or something?

Lunatique
04-09-2005, 10:14 AM
All of them cover a very wide range--in fact they cover the whole range you need to be a great artist of the highest caliber. If you can actually master the lessons taught in any of these books, you'll already be a master.

When I say the whole range, I mean the entire range of art knowledge--from composition color theory, values, edges, surface technique, step-by-step..etc.

paperclip
04-10-2005, 09:24 AM
It makes you wonder- the great artists weren't that old when they were producing these great works: Ingres won the Prix de Rome with 'The Envoys of Agamemnon' when he was 21.
I still can't understand why they don't teach solid traditional techniques in many art schools- it's all concept stuff, which is fine, but only up to a certain point. What's changed? Don't they want people with good solid techniques? (By techniques, I mean the information which may be gleaned from the books you mentioned above.)
Yes, ateliers are still going strong, but should artists who wish to understand such things have to go outside their own college for such things? It seems they are only promoting one type of art: concept. They of all people should understand the value of different types of art.
It irritates me.....
Ok, I'm calming down now.
Thanks for telling me about these books. I did pick up Harley Brown's book in Barnes and Noble the last time I was in america and I got so engrossed in it, the store started closing around me...and I didn't notice... it was such a good book. We can't seem to get them here (Ireland). EVERY bookstore I go into just has books about how to draw puppies or that sort of thing, but the more I learn about art, the more I understand that you have to understand the underlying principles and properties of the world around us in order to be able to represent them accurately.
Off my soapbox now! Nice to see a similar- minded person around. I was getting so discouraged in art because the stuff I liked seemed to be scorned right and left, then I discovered artrenewalcenter and cgtalk. I am progressing, however slowly. I love getting my work criticised harshly. Keep up the good work everyone-and keep criticising!

Stahlberg
04-10-2005, 02:49 PM
The free online Andrew Loomis books are linked in the sticky thread at the top here,
"Art Theory links"

paperclip
04-10-2005, 03:16 PM
I'm going through 'creative illustration' at the moment. It's a goldmine.
Thanks for the link!

jmBoekestein
04-10-2005, 05:30 PM
On a sidenote to this thread.

Those books have torrent files for them. I'm not up to scratch with torrents but the host is off-line a lot. But there are other places that allow for free uploading. Trouble is that a lot of torrent sites are not legeal for 100%. Any thoughts on this, I would host them myself but my website isn't up yet. Anybody know any legal free torrent hosts?

skipstah70
06-11-2005, 10:22 PM
hey paperclip .. I think the reason that the Loomis books are out of print is because whomever holds the Loomis estate now is refusing to sell rights to reprint .. or so I've heard. It really sucks, such amazing information!!! You can pretty well find PDF's online for all the books, but there is a huge difference in owning a copy... alot of the greyscale gets lost when scanned I think.. but can't complain if it's for free I guess!! You're not missing much in the creative illustration book though.. the colour repros of his work are actually pretty bad in the original... must have been the old printing technique or something.... the info in that book is awesome though...

Skips

Gord-MacDonald
06-12-2005, 03:26 AM
Some books that are expensive but good:

Johnannes Itten - 'The Art of Color',
'The Elements of Color' (less expensive)

Edited by Jurg Spiller:
a) 'Paul Klee Notebooks Volume 1 The Thinking Eye',
b) 'Paul Klee Notebooks Volume 2 The Nature of Nature'
These are the collections of the actual notes created and used by Klee for his teaching at the Bauhaus - sometimes a little obscure, but if approached correctly contains some powerful ideas. Note: Paul Klee was quite hostile to 'traditional representational art'

I like Burne Hogarths books (I know there are many who don't)

Kimon Nicholades 'the natural way to draw' - awesome but require very serious commitment (300 hrs)

Gary Faigain 'The Artists Complete Guide to Facial Expression'


Finally a book that I think every artist should own - even if it is just to enjoy the shear beauty of it - 'The Illusion of Life' by Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas (two of the legendary 'nine old men' from the Disney studio)

Gord

Lunatique
06-12-2005, 04:08 AM
I would generally steer people away from art instructional books that focus on the "touchy feely New Age" approach. If you open up an art instruction book, and it's it's got very few pictures in it, but overloaded with words, then you know you've picked up a "touchy feely New Age" book. Books like that try to teach you how to think like an artist, not the skills you need to be an artist. We all have different things we want to express with our art, and you will not be able to express them unless you have the skill to handle the tools necessary. Most of the the books that try to teach you how to think like an artist are targeted at people who lack that special sense that makes artists unique in the first place--basically, teaching non-artists how to think like an artist. What we want to express as artists could be dramatically different from one person to the next, and what's intriguing to you might be boring to me. That's why learning the skills is the most important thing, because you'll have your own ideas about what you want to express.

tayete
06-13-2005, 11:05 AM
Some books that are expensive but good:



Kimon Nicholades 'the natural way to draw' - awesome but require very serious commitment (300 hrs)


Gord

Yesterday I arrived to the middle of the exercises. I started the first of February, and I will probably end in October. This book is hard, but for the first time in a long long time I think I am LEARNING.

bealobo
06-13-2005, 01:50 PM
Hi!

Paperclip, I find this thread very interesting, and I have a suggestion/asking if you have the time and you feel like it:
why do not edit the first post to add other's links / references? Just like in the DSG with the "tutorials, hints and brushes" thread from Goro. I think it will be useful.
:)

SpeccySteve
06-13-2005, 02:13 PM
Here's another link for those Sargent notes, since some people were having trouble with the first link.

http://www.goodbrush.com/misc/painting_lessons/sargent_notes.pdf

paperclip
06-13-2005, 02:17 PM
Done, bealobo!

Great links & discussion....and lunatique I heartily agree with you about the 'new agey' books. There are far too many of them around and you provided a very good reason why not to use them.

How about the people who have reaped the benefit of books such as 'Drawing on the right hand side of the brain' and others?

dbclemons
06-13-2005, 05:55 PM
I recommend a couple books by Waldemar Januszczak "Techniques of the Great Masters" and "Techniques of the World's Great Painters." Both examine specific paintings of great painters through history up to 1960s. He analyses the process steps for each painting, and although I'd like to see more examples or be more in-depth, it's still very informative. Good reproductions also.

A good book about painting that includes more modern stuff like alkyds is "The Complete Oil Painter" by Brian Gorst. It has a nice color chart too.

The best book I have on drawing is by Robert Hale "Drawing Lessons of the Great Maters." He also has a good book on figure drawing "Master Class in Figure Drawing."

-David

Gord-MacDonald
06-15-2005, 06:47 PM
Johannes Itten: 'Design and Form - The Basic Course at the Bahaus and Later' (revised edition)

not a how-to book, but is interesting for those working on basic design/composition skills.

Gord

Gord-MacDonald
06-21-2005, 07:43 PM
"Understanding Comics" by Scott McCloud is a terrific and highly original study of the comic artform. McCloud presents his analysis of comics using a comic book format.

his website:

http://www.scottmccloud.com (http://www.scottmccloud.com/)


From the Critics ("")

"In one lucid, well-designed chapter after another, he guides us through the elements of comics style and...how words combine with pictures to work their singular magic. When the 215-page journey is finally over, most readers will find it difficult to look at comics in quite the same way ever again." -- Garry Trudeau, New York Times Book Review
"If you’ve ever felt bad about wasting your life reading comics, then check out Scott McCloud’s classic book immediately. You still might feel you’ve wasted your life, but you’ll know why, and you’ll be proud." -- Matt Groenning, Creator of The Simpsons
"A rare and exciting work that ingeniously uses comics to examine the medium itself." -- Publishers Weekly
</B></B>
Scott McCloud now has a new work out: "Reinventing Comics" I gotta check it out.


Gord

tayete
06-23-2005, 12:23 PM
Harley Brown's eternal truths for every artist - By Harley Brown & Lewis Barrett Lehrman




Whoa Luna, you made me drool when I searched for the books you suggested.
CREATIVE ILLUSTRATION of Loomis is one of the biggest helps out there, but I had already read it. So I bought the one above, and it just arrived today from AMAZON. Looks great. I had already read "Drawing with the right side..." that didn't help me too much as I think it is focused on people who have never drawn a line (I have been able to get in that "trance" status the whole book tries to get you into, since I drew as a kid). On the other hand, "The Natural Way to Draw" by Nicolaides is really helpful, not because it teaches you how to draw, but because teaches you:


How to look at everything
You must practice every day
Self-discipline. Even though you don't feel like, you have to get 3 spare hours to draw
How to "feel" the form...
I am now getting a break from it, once I got to the middle of the book, as I was beginning to be too tired...

I have to thank you as your attitude has made me paint again with oils, and I must say I am enjoying them much more than digital art, I don't know why. I seem to "see" better the values, and everything seems much more lifeful. Maybe it is the "feel" of the oils, I don't know, but I feel really well painting now.

I had been some years without touching my palette, and except the trouble of setting the easel (two kids and a wife don't let too much room for my hobbies) and the smell of turpentine in the whole house, I think I am starting to prefer it to digital art (something I never thought I'd recognize :) )

Lunatique
06-23-2005, 02:20 PM
tayete - Glad you are enjoying it. You can use white spirits or turpenoid (or other similar products that don't smell) as alternatives to turpentine.

Tom Browning's book is actually even better than Harley Brown's book. Richard Schmid's book is also better too (but Harley's book is still excellent though).

The DVD's from Ricard Schmid are real eye-openers. Nothing will demonstrate technique better than DVD's. I've got all his DVD's, have Weistling's on the way, and will be ordering Burdick and Lipking's DVD's too.

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