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Leonard
04-05-2005, 03:04 AM
http://cgnetworks.com/cgtalk/meettheartists/scott_robertson/scottheader.jpg

Our first artist featured in this Meet the Artists series is Scott Robertson. We featured Scott on CGNetworks last year here (http://www.cgnetworks.com/story_custom.php?story_id=2048).

About Scott Robertson
Scott Robertson was born in Oregon and grew up in the country. Under the guidance of his father, who was also an artist and had attended Art Center College of Design, Scott was drawn to the world of design through his love of vehicles. This passion led him to Art Center in 1987, where he studied industrial design and graduated with a degree in Transportation Design in 1990. “I loved going to Art Center and everything about Industrial Design,” explains Robertson. “But during my final year of school, I had grown bored with cars and the pace of their development, so after graduating, I opened a design firm with Neville Page.”

For the next five years, Scott was commissioned for a variety of design jobs with Kestrel, Giro Sport Design, Nissan, Volvo, Yamaha, Scott USA, Schwinn, and Medical Composite Technology. The collaboration with Neville Page continues to this day, where the two now share a studio in Culver City, California. Recent clients have included BMW subsidiary Design-works/USA, Bell Sports, Raleigh Bicycles, Mattel Toys, Patagonia, Scifi Lab, 3DO, Minority Report feature film, Nike, Universal Studios, OVO, Black Diamond, Rockstar Games, and Sony Entertainment, to name a few.

Scott founded Design Studio Press (http://www.designstudiopress.com), a publishing company dedicated to art and design. He also teaches at Art Center College of Design, where some of the best talents have recently emerged under his guidance, several such talents being Feng Zhu, Mike Yamada, Felix Yoon and Khang Le.

Scott has released numerous training DVDs with The Gnomon Workshop (http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com). His latest two DVDs cover Industrial Design Rendering (http://www.cgproshop.com/product/000060/) and Creating Unique Environments (http://www.cgproshop.com/product/000058/). Both are available from the CGProShop (http://www.cgproshop.com).

Related Links
Scott Robertson & Neville Page's website (http://www.drawthrough.com/)
Design Studio Press (http://www.designstudiopress.com)
The Art of Scott Robertson (CGNetworks) (http://www.cgnetworks.com/story_custom.php?story_id=2048)
The Gnomon Workshop (http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com)

http://cgnetworks.com/cgtalk/meettheartists/scott_robertson/scott1.jpg

http://cgnetworks.com/cgtalk/meettheartists/scott_robertson/scott2.jpg

http://cgnetworks.com/cgtalk/meettheartists/scott_robertson/scott3.jpg

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Rules for Q&A/Critique:




Please be polite when asking questions or for critique.
Check the whole thread to see if your question has already been asked. Do not post duplicate questions.
When posting critique, please use the CGTalk Attachments feature so that the artwork remains accessible.
Note that the Artist is under no obligation to answer all questions or critique all work posted. It is at his/her sole discretion to answer questions or critique work.
If the Artist does not answer your question or critique your work, do not harass him/her.
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Kansai
04-05-2005, 03:55 AM
Hello Scott. I am and aspiring 2-d concept artist currently putting together work to submitt to game studios. I have been going to your site for a while for inspiration and your work is nothing but inspiring and motivational to me, I am trying to gain a little insight of what is expected of the work load of a concept artist new to the industry.

My question to you is what is the genral time limit for and artist to complete a concept piece of work on a given project.

I find myself doing hand renderings for most of my work which can take a good amount of time to complete. I am currently trying to cross over into the digital medium.

If you can shed any light on this that would be great thanx for your time.:)

UnknownArtist
04-05-2005, 03:56 AM
I, currently a sponge of a listener for information, am just breaking into the 3D imaging scene. Just wanted to delve into a quick obvious (for me) question.

Your art work is amazing and original. Where do you find the inspiration for such works?

ThePumpkinKing
04-05-2005, 04:00 AM
Hi scott. I love your work, and the way your render cars and things like that is beautiful.

I just have one question. When you are sketching concepts, how do you start out, and with what? Do you start out with markers or pens or pencils? Do you just outline the idea itself right away or do you draw guidelines first for the sketch? Thanks in advance.

chillnlikeamug
04-05-2005, 04:10 AM
Hi Scott,

#1. I've always wanted to know why it seems like great designers, such as yourself, rarely see your more radical designs implemented in the automotive industry? I'd pay good money for one of your vehicles.

#2. Your tutorial in photoshop for the bicycle looks like a real work of engineering genius, I could be wrong, but do you have an engineering background or is it just part of your talent to create great designs that look so sound?

Thanks for being here!
Sincerely John Le Baron

maxrelics
04-05-2005, 04:31 AM
Hi Scott.

I have only a couple of questions.

First: What tools do you use in a given day. Does it chance for every piece of art work you do or are there a couple tried and true things that you use to make your drawings.

Second: Which do you prefer, working with computers to make art, or working more with your hands. By this I mean do you like drawing with a tablet (if you use one) or do you prefer to work with a simple piece of paper and pencil or a canvas and a paint brush.

kamrhon
04-05-2005, 04:41 AM
Scott,
Kudos...seriously. The material I have seen of yours is amazing. One question: is the reason that your stuff comes out so life-like a result of technique in a particular software or softwares? Can someone who desires life-like results from their work achieve them just through observation of nature or must one know HOW to achieve particular results within their 2d software package of choice?
Anyway, I appreciate your time.
C

kgb
04-05-2005, 04:58 AM
1. Have you ever painted traditionally or just got your hands wet? What one/two tips do recommend or stress to become a great painter.

2. Do you draw from life? In past? Now? How do you keep your skill up by practicing drawing which subjects? (life, anatomy, imagination?) One/two tips you recommend or stress to become great at drawing?

3. How long do you spend on a drawing/painting to have it finished approximetly?

Take care Scott and thank you for your time to answer these.

Lunatique
04-05-2005, 05:02 AM
Hey Scott!

I'd like to know your thoughts on the history/trends of industrial/entertainment design. It seems that the current generation is mostly influenced by Syd Mead, from his marker rendering style to the design sensibility. But of course Syd Mead isn't the only designer in the history of industrial/entertainment design. What are some of the other pioneers and innovators that you think deserves more notice, and how would you describe the various trends in the modern history of industrial/entertainment design? (For example, the 70's was dominated by boxy designs, then that gave away to emphasis on curves and more aerodynamic looks.)

On a side note, I don't know if you're familiar with Yamashita Ikuto's works. I highly recommend his manga series "Dark Whisper," published by Bandai (there are only two volumes). His design sense is very slick and very beautiful. Dark Whisper has never been translated and published in English, so you'll have to hunt them down from Japanese online bookshops or local ones in your area. Yamashita is currently most known for his mechanic designs on the anime series Neon Genesis Evangelion.

SPIDER2544
04-05-2005, 07:04 AM
hey scott if your teaching a class again at art center next term, do you mind if i sit in?
im a fine art major and im not to hot at sketching and figgure your lectures would help out a bit hehe

DodoPAN
04-05-2005, 07:07 AM
Scott, i started a thread, Car studio lighting recepies (http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=224337) here, on CGTalk. I am looking for that PERFECT car lighting in studio with 3d Max and MentalRay. Any advices ? Hope to hear from you !

Fede
04-05-2005, 07:36 AM
Hi Mr Robertson,

I'm a huge fan of your work and have been a been captivated by your sketches of the Snow Cruiser. It is truely outstanding to see how many variations you came up with of the same machine, to me that is true inspiration.

I have made an attempt at bringing your 2D drawings to 3D and would love to hear your comments and/or suggestions regarding the modeling as well as texturing. Perhaps you saw the cruiser in different colours, purpose ect.

Snow Cruiser Link (http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=226417)

Also what is their true purpose of them? i saw them as some type of specialised rescue unit, and that is why i chose the colors that i did.

Thank you for taking the time for this thread.

Skjoldbroder
04-05-2005, 09:47 AM
Mr. Robertson

I've been working professionally with print and game art for four years now, mainly painting, texturing, modeling and concepting. During that time, I've gotten increasingly interested in working in the movie business as well, either as a texturer or a matte painter - but given that I'm self-taught and without a traditional background, my question is this :

To what extent do studios go on portfolio when hiring people? Is it all about the experience, or does the education behind it factor massively as well? I'm assuming it's all about the talent, but given a choice between person A and B - both talented - the choice would most likely be the person with a traditional background?

Thanks for spreading your knowledge around, I enjoyed your workshop at the 3d festival last year. (And the others, for that matter. Sad to see there won't be a 3d festival this year)


All the best
/Mogens

NoSeRider
04-05-2005, 12:15 PM
Do you think Industrial Design and Character Design are two different disciplines, or do you believe if you know one you should be able to do the other?

Such as if you train yourself to do anatomy, life drawing and character concepts, you should be just as able to do architecture and environments?

Basically, I'm asking this because it seems you can't do one without doing the other.....well a character generally needs an environment............however, an environment does not necessarily need a character.

BC1967
04-05-2005, 01:35 PM
Hello Scott,
I was wondering what your toughts were on the the subject of the influnce of matreials on design. It seems as manufactured and refined materials have improved in composition, strength, and the ease with which they can be formed into shapes, industrial design has moved ever closer to pure organic forms.
Now that we're close to the limits of our technology to create and manipulate these manmade materials ( barring any leap in nanotechnology in the near future ), do you think industrial design will begin looking back to it's own history for influnces in the future, as opposed to nature.
Looking forward to your thoughts on this, as well as the attached image.
Thanks for taking the time to do this.

tonich03
04-05-2005, 01:48 PM
hello mr robertson,

I'm happy to have the possibility of having a contact with you,as you're one of the best concept artists around.I might have many questions,but I will priorize only one:
Q I am only 16 year old,and i know i still have a way to go,i was drawing really a lot lately,especially sketching,learning photoshop etc. all by myself.I wasnt thinking of getting to be an artist because my mother is,and advises me to get another job,as this may be very risky.After all not averybody has success.Though she doesnt know anything about the cg,and the way it could be used(webs etc.)So i was thinking of studying something else first,then art.
Do you think this makes sense?i enjoy drawing,so i think it wont be a major problem going to an art school after getting any other degree.Do you think going to an art school is crucial about getting a good job,having a nice portfolio?

Thank you very much

ArYeS
04-05-2005, 02:56 PM
Hallo, Mr Robertson

I have one question about you. It's tricky a little bit. Do you prefer 2D car renders or 3D car renders?

TraceR
04-05-2005, 02:59 PM
This has to be the sweetest concept car I have ever seen! Very nice job.

http://cgnetworks.com/cgtalk/meettheartists/scott_robertson/scott3.jpg

How do you come up with these designs? I know that that is not an easy question to answer but I often have a hard time thinking up nice concepts. Artist's block is something that I experience often and I'm just wondering if you experience the same thing. If so, how do you overcome it?

Thanks,


TraceR

JVaughan
04-05-2005, 03:14 PM
Hey Scott,

Big fan of your design and concept work. I picked up the first 3 of your DVDs after Christmas and have watched them several times (Your first is still by far the most valueable though). My question is this:

Given your usual rendering style is very tight, do you usually go through your entire process for digital works? For those not as familiar, do you completely set up and and do free hand perspective on everything prior to switching to digital, or do you work more loosely and then refine your perspective construction as your work, using just rough guides to start? Any methodological would be highly appreciated ( but you could probably save it up for a 5th DVD).

Can't wait to see more new stuff from but I am sure your are quite busy with projects under wraps,

-Josh

sykosys
04-05-2005, 03:18 PM
Scott,

Much honor and respect.

Sometimes clients can be ... absurd in their demands. In your case, I would expect that you'd get some freedom, but have you ever had a client that you simply could not please? And, for that matter, have you ever had to tell a client to go stuff themselves in an impolitely described hole somewhere, because of their expectations?

HellBoy
04-05-2005, 03:33 PM
Hi scott

I am a student still and was wondering, in your point of view, do you think breaking in the industry either Animation or game industry has gone harder, if so, what would you advice us to do to prepare

I Love your work :thumbsup:

cheers

thanks

scottsch
04-05-2005, 04:28 PM
Hi Scott,

Is your book "How to Draw Vehicles" going to be out this year? I have some questions about the content: Is it going to include color rendering lessons, and is it going to have a section on creating vehicles from scratch - focusing on the design aspects of the car, not just the drawing technique?

What types of objects from the real world (i.e. reference material) do you bring into the creative vehicle design process - or do you just make everything up as you go? I watched the Gnomon DVD on hovercraft - and the main thing I got from it was that I was watching an artist that was highly experienced and had a lot of ideas about form committed to memory. I can honestly say I've never seen anyone draw like that before - you were pulling things out of thin air while most other artists I watch are looking at reference when they draw. So, just wondering what some of these influences are that feed the idea process. Do you spend a lot of hours drawing from reference, or do you try to be creative as much as possible? In school they teach people to draw from reference as much as possible, but when you try to switch to making things up and being creative, it's not exactly an automatic thing. Are there some tricks to making the transition from copying what you see to actually inventing forms?

Is industry demand for traditional concept artists/designers (people who draw, more so than people that are in 3D production) as high as it used to be, or lower, or is demand getting much stronger now for good concept designers?

Thanks for your time.

crossbones
04-05-2005, 05:48 PM
:thumbsup:GREAT STUFF!! The colors are really fantastic.

Who invented drawing through?

Ecthelion
04-05-2005, 08:44 PM
hey scott/ mr. robertson,
i'm unsure of how to address you, myself being 16 years of age.
i don't have much to say. by now, i'm sure you know your work is incredible and probably some of the most "grabbing" artwork of the whole conceptual design genre.
i've loved your work for years (honestly-that no exaguration [sp]. i'm 16, but even years ago you and doug chiang were my two greatest inspirations).
the biggest problem i've ever had in looking at your work is this:
i see, i love, i try, i suck. i'm a real perfectionist, and if something doesn't satisfy me, i throw it away. what i love about your work is its "solidity," that is, your lines are so well-trained and your knowledge of space is incredible.
here's the question:

how can i, being a decent artist and designer, strive most efficiently toward artwork like yours? more specifically, what can i do to understand perspective artwork, and shapes in space? any books that helped you? anything said directly to me from you will be incredible. you are my hero.
thanks alot.

luke shuman

ffourier
04-05-2005, 08:54 PM
Hello scott,
i am a french CG student and i find your work very impressive. I just want to know what was your work on Minority Report Feature film (i love this !).
And just for the fun do you know some french CG school ? what do you think about french artists (french touch) ?
thanks for your replies.
bye
Frédéric FOURIER

here is some of my work :
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/rendu_final02.jpg
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/mam1.jpg
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/mam2.jpg
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/mam3.jpg
this architecture is from Santiago Calatrava
if you have time to say to me what you think of this it would be perfect :)

thewave
04-05-2005, 08:58 PM
Greetings and Salutations,
What, if any, are the biggest issues (hurdles) which have arisen from owning your own business? What did you do to overcome those issues? What was the outcome of your actions?

I know this doesn't have much to do with the artwork, but all the people here aren't doing this work for their health alone.

I would appreciate any comments if you have time. If not...you do marvelous work and it has been a pleasure seeing the visions of your mind.

Have a great day,
Benjamin Dean

HellBoy
04-05-2005, 09:03 PM
wait a second, is scott going to read this?

icedeyes
04-05-2005, 09:24 PM
hello scott,

I am a big fan of your work and I own two gnomon dvds that you made (love them by the way)... just wanted to say i love your work and ask if you knew of any good university for industrial design (other than the one you went)...

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 02:09 AM
from: Kansai,
My question to you is what is the genral time limit for and artist to complete a concept piece of work on a given project?

It can vary quite a bit. I will try to give you some idea based on some of my past experience. When I was working on the vehicles for Spy Hunter 2 I was usually given between 12 to 16 hours of working time to do the design and one color rendering. The basic work flow was for me to do a few pages of quick thumbnails and then send them to the creative director, he would then choose a direction and I would work up the final line drawings of the front and rear 3/4 views. After these were approved I would then quickly throw some color on one of the views. This was about as fast as a project could be done. On the more relaxed side of things if you are asked to do a tightly rendered environment you might be given a couple of days to a week to complete it.

Hope this helps.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 02:38 AM
Oops I forgot this reply to post first.

Thanks for the warm welcome!

I hope I can provide some good answers to your questions. Sorry for the slow start but since this went live last during my night and I just finished a long day of teaching at Art Center this is the first time I have had to read the questions and reply.

So I better get to it...

Artbot
04-06-2005, 02:41 AM
Hi Scott. I'm an admirer of your work and appreciate you taking the time to do this.

I have 2 questions:

Are you at a point in your career where you no longer have to actively chase after jobs (in other words, clients seek you out)?

I'm been an artist in the games biz for 13 years and would like to do more freelance illustration work (3D, 2D, Photo manipulation, or mixed) on the side. Got any tips on the easiest way to find potential clients? I'm a fellow ACCD ID grad, but have been out of the commecial illustration loop for a long time.

Thanks for your time.

Richard Green

PS: I just noticed we overlapped a year (1988) at ACCD. Can't believe I never met you. AC was an amazing experience, huh?

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 02:48 AM
from: UnknownArtist,
Where do you find the inspiration for such works?

That's a good question. I think that most of it comes from my education as an industrial designer. In that field you are taught a process of how to look at anything and come up with interesting design solutions for that subject. Second I would have to say that hanging around with such an amazing group of artists here in Los Angeles makes it very easy to always be inspired. It seems like someone I know is always doing something cool, that gets me going as well. I think that forums like this one are a larger version of what I have here in LA with my friends and will hopefully continue to grow and inspire all of us together.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 02:54 AM
from: ThePumpkinKing,
When you are sketching concepts, how do you start out, and with what? Do you start out with markers or pens or pencils? Do you just outline the idea itself right away or do you draw guidelines first for the sketch?

To start I like to use all forms of media. Not usually at the same time, but if I'm going for something organic in form I lean towards the media that is easy to get smooth gradations with, like chalk and pencil. If I'm trying to go for something mechanical I like to use pen and marker. Since I have to teach all of the differnt techniques I like to experiment and start many, many differnt ways. As I really believe that strong perspective drawing skills are a great way to communicate your ideas to others I usually start with some loose perspective guide lines to get the sketch started.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:03 AM
from: chillnlikeamug,
1. I've always wanted to know why it seems like great designers, such as yourself, rarely see your more radical designs implemented in the automotive industry? I'd pay good money for one of your vehicles?

Thanks, that makes two of us.
Basically I think that doing something like putting a real vehicle into production is so expensive that no one company or one person at a company wants to be held responsible for risking so much money on a radical design. The general public is very conservative and they like familar designs. If it was your money to invest you might spend it the same way they do.

2. Your tutorial in photoshop for the bicycle looks like a real work of engineering genius, I could be wrong, but do you have an engineering background or is it just part of your talent to create great designs that look so sound?

Thanks, but I think that must be the reflections talking to you!
I have designed a lot of real bicycle frames for Kestrel over the last 15 years, so I do know where things go and again my ID training and professional experience make it easy to know how to make things "look" like they would work. That bike is really more of a movie bike. It could be made, someone colud ride it, but it would be heavy and inefficient with today's manufacturing processes.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:09 AM
from: maxrelics,
First: What tools do you use in a given day. Does it change for every piece of art work you do or are there a couple tried and true things that you use to make your drawings?

As mentioned a couple of questions ago I like to try everything, all media is fair game.

Second: Which do you prefer, working with computers to make art, or working more with your hands. By this I mean do you like drawing with a tablet (if you use one) or do you prefer to work with a simple piece of paper and pencil or a canvas and a paint brush?

I acutally like both traditional and digital medai quite a bit. The way it seems to be breaking down lately is I do my design work with traditional media working monochromatically and then I scan that into Photoshop and do my color rendering there where it is cleaner, faster and easier to to achieve more realistic material indication. Plus ther is always command Z.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:15 AM
from: kamrhon,
Is the reason that your stuff comes out so life-like a result of technique in a particular software or softwares? Can someone who desires life-like results from their work achieve them just through observation of nature or must one know HOW to achieve particular results within their 2d software package of choice?

Yeah, it basically has nothing to do with software and everything to do with gaining the knowledge of what you are observing in nature. You can observe everything you need but the problem arises when you try to apply what you are observing to a form that know one has ever seen before and you are the only one who knows what you are trying accomplish with the sections of your object. This is where having someone explain the physics of what you are observing can go a long way to helping you apply this to your own designs.

alexqwerty
04-06-2005, 03:24 AM
Hi Scott

I've bought 2 concept DVD from gnomon and your teaching is amazing. Thank you for an excellent tutorial.

I always wanted to ask you whether you have any recommendation for beginners. I'm aiming at getting a job in 3D modelling or concept design in US within 2-3 years. Can design skills be self-taught or must I attend college?

I've been learning to draw and practise modelling every day/night lately. (I am computer science student - should have choose design degree instead).

I from Australia, i wish I can attend your college. Hope you'll release more DVD in the future regarding the subject of Lighting and Shading

Thank you very much Scott.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:26 AM
from: kgb,
1. Have you ever painted traditionally or just got your hands wet? What one/two tips do recommend or stress to become a great painter?

I learned how to do all of the rendering and material indication stuff the old way. When I was in school we did not know how to use the computer to do digital 2D work, other than preparing our resumes. One would be to find a good mentor or educator and listen. Second would be to practice, practice looking, thinking and drawing.

2. Do you draw from life? In past? Now? How do you keep your skill up by practicing drawing which subjects? (life, anatomy, imagination?) One/two tips you recommend or stress to become great at drawing?

I'm really short on time lately and so I have no time to draw, which means when I do again in a couple of weeks I will be rusty! I do not often draw from life. I like to start from the ground up and create things I have never seen before. I think learning how to do good perspective drawing can be one of the most powerful creative assets you can obtain. It will allow you to easily create things from your imagination that look convincingly real to other people.

3. How long do you spend on a drawing/painting to have it finished approximetly?

Oh really I cannot answer this one because each drawing/painting is different and some done in mere seconds can be all that is required and if you spend more time on it all you'll do it potentially screw it up!

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:28 AM
Lunatique,
I'm running low on energy and I'll get back to you on this one.

kraal
04-06-2005, 03:32 AM
Mr. Scott Robertson.
I would like to thank you for taking the time to do this. I have got as far as I have in art due to talent, and proper mentor/student (me being the student) relations. Not by much education. (I cannot afford too much schooling; I do have 2 degrees one in graphic design and another in fine art). I have to say I really enjoy your work.
I was really exposed to your work one day when I was working as inventory supervisor at a bookstore and decided to run your name through our database and see what books I could find. A quirky little title showed up ‘ How to draw cars the hot wheels way’ well that book is now in my library.
Ok on to the question. Sans school placement what is the best way to get a job as a concept artist for film, television, or games? I have been able to get work with comics due to the fact that you can approach a company during a convention or they have open submissions, ect. Is there such a thing for film work? I know the talent needs to be there I am more curious about the initial open door opportunity.
Thanks for taking the time for this again

Kraal

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:32 AM
from: SPIDER2544,
hey scott if your teaching a class again at art center next term, do you mind if i sit in?

I will be teaching again next term, two Vis Com classes. Generally I cannot allow other students to sit in and take away table space from the regulars, but please come by whenever you like to check out the work on the wall each week. Hit the library to check out the DVDs. See you around school.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:38 AM
from: DodoPAN,
Scott, i started a thread, Car studio lighting recepies here, on CGTalk. I am looking for that PERFECT car lighting in studio with 3d Max and MentalRay. Any advices ? Hope to hear from you !

I'm sorry I'm no help on the 3D side of things, strictly 2D. I doubt there is a singular perfect set up though. I mean since it is a shiny object designing the environment around your car will be the key to a succesful rendering, in regards to the reflections anyway. Of course the reflections are very sensitive to the viewing angle and the sections of the surfaces all of which will need to be tweaked on a case by case basis, just like doing good photography.

alexqwerty
04-06-2005, 03:43 AM
Hi Scott

Your DVD at Gnomon is amazing, Thank you for a great tutorial.

I was wondering whether you have any guidance or recommendation for beginners. Can these design skills be self-taught or must I attend school of design?

my goal is to become a 3D modeller with great concept design skills after 2 years + getting a job. Do you have a tips on how to successfully achieve this goal?

Please release a DVD on Lighting, Shading and Texturing. It would be very helpful for lots of students.

I'm from Australia, doing computer science but love art/graphics.
Thank and Take care Scott
Alex

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:43 AM
from: Fede,
I have made an attempt at bringing your 2D drawings to 3D and would love to hear your comments and/or suggestions regarding the modeling as well as texturing. Perhaps you saw the cruiser in different colours, purpose ect.

Thanks, you are right it is a sort of rescue/scout vehicle. The model looks like it is coming along, some of the window shapes and main body surfaces look like they could use some love. The skis and the track look nice. Send me some jpegs if you take it further.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 03:47 AM
from: plaf,
To what extent do studios go on portfolio when hiring people? Is it all about the experience, or does the education behind it factor massively as well? I'm assuming it's all about the talent, but given a choice between person A and B - both talented - the choice would most likely be the person with a traditional background?

Talent, talent, talent. Really your past formal education or lack thereof means very little to getting a decent job. Your experience is important, but being pleasant and have great skills is the key combination to sucess.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 04:10 AM
from: NoSeRider,
Do you think Industrial Design and Character Design are two different disciplines, or do you believe if you know one you should be able to do the other?

As a creative design exercise I do not see that there is much of a difference. Anytime you are doing entertainment design all of the subjects such as environments, characters, vehicles and props only exist to support the story and move it forward. Formally speaking traditioanal ID work is quite different in that it encompases many more disciplines in regards to making a 3D product that people live with and use. Ideally I believe that good well rounded entertainment designers should be able to design anything for any time period.

Such as if you train yourself to do anatomy, life drawing and character concepts, you should be just as able to do architecture and environments?

No, I do not usually see this. Here is why I think that is.
Most of the figurative training that exists is from observation and rarely from one's own imagination. When this is all you have it will be hard to start with nothing to create something entirely new in regards to ID subjects or environments. One of the most important skills lacking in figuatively trained designers is their abiltiy to draw in perpsective and fully realize an imagined space of their own design from multiple view points. Even if you draw a lot of architecture from observation you will be filling your visual library which is good and can be helpful but you do not need to know anything about perpsective to accomplish well executed representative drawings. If you can imagine what you are looking at as flat 2D shapes it is all about properly reproducing these shapes to make a "good" drawing. Knowing how to build the same thing in perspective a month later from your imagination is where having some knowledge of more technical drawing skills is very helpful.

Basically, I'm asking this because it seems you can't do one without doing the other.....well a character generally needs an environment............however, an environment does not necessarily need a character.

True it would be nice to see more charcters in the environments we see and like wise more environments supporting the character designs we see, but if you are hired to design one or the other it is hard to make a case for spending the extra time to do so when you most likely are not being paid to do so.

Scott_Robertson
04-06-2005, 04:13 AM
I think that's it for tonight...I'll try and get through more as soon as I can.

All the best!

S.

Skjoldbroder
04-06-2005, 12:08 PM
Mr. Robertson : thanks for your reply.

In connection with my previous question, I've got one about portfolios as well. When applying for jobs, I've usually included a broad range of stuff : sketches, finished 2d art, low and high poly 3d models, textures and animations. This has burned me a few times, since it seems some studios get confused by this and prefer single-function artists that focus solely on one aspect of production
- whereas I think being an all-rounder is a good thing, especially if you show some proficiency at all of them (I guess it's up to the studios to judge that, though :))

Anyways. My question is: would you recommend compiling a portfolio singlemindedly, showing off only stuff that's directly relevant to the position you're applying for, or would you include other things to show off your range as well? To what extent do movie studios appreciate all-rounders?

(Although I'm guessing that your answer is going to be : moviemakers mainly employ single-function artists because they're usually better at that one function, so include some other stuff, but concentrate on the things directly relevant)


Thanks again for taking time to do this.!
\\\\\\\\\
http://www.skjoldbroder.dk/fisse/monkeee.jpg


All the best
/Mogens

skullmonkeys
04-06-2005, 12:58 PM
Hello, Scott.

Your dvds helped me a lot. They are the best learning material I've seen on perspective drawing.

My question
When designing any fast moving vehicles, I'd assume you have to have knowledge of aerodynamics to a certain degree or mechanical engineering if you are designing a machine/robot. How do you balance the technical and design aspect in your designs? How much knowledge of the technical is required when doing ID. Are there any good books/resources you can recommend specifically for designers?

I guess one of the things you can do is copy vehicles/machines and build up your visual library?

Thank you in advance.

Pauleeeee
04-06-2005, 02:10 PM
Hey Scott,
First of all thanks for answering these questions.

Anyway here goes...

I've been doing the whole CG thing now for about two years now while attending a degree course (which I don't think is very good but I'll stick it out just to get that piece of paper). My problem is that I find I keep on going from one area to another (2D to 3D...modelling to some animation...and even programming.)

I would really like to focus on one area and become as much of an expert at is as I can because I'm aware that alot of places aren't looking to employ a jack of all trades kind of guy.

So basically my question is: When you were starting to learn over the first few years did you find it hard to focus on one area like me or were you always very focused on the 2D design end of things?

-Thanks ;)

nathanwallis
04-06-2005, 02:42 PM
no questions, but from what i have read so far.....thanks for making yourself accessible to people.................................

cheers,

Nathan

fabmedia
04-06-2005, 03:52 PM
Scott,

I love your work. It's awesome.

My question is that I'm a self-employed graphic designer and I'm creating more and more 3D models for animation or rapid prototyping for either other studios/companies (sub-contract), or illustrations for my own clients (directly). Graphic design is becoming a very small part of my business (currently about 20-30%). I'm wondering if I should look at staying in business for myself, or should I look at jumping into the TV/ Film industry? I would like to jump into either industry, but it comes down to finances. Currently I make only $35-40K CDN/ year but is it worth it?

I look forward to your reply.

pejot
04-06-2005, 04:02 PM
Hi,
I really love the "fish like" air ships. The design is absolutely fantastic.

pongball
04-07-2005, 12:47 AM
Scott, my question is regarding your design process, and your opinion of my design process:

Question1:
1. hand drawings, scanned
2. contrast adjusted in photoshop
3. Corel Painter IX w/Wacom >> @ this point of the process, I would like to know if you suggest creating multiple layers for multiple items, or, like someone like Ryan Church, do you also like to "merge" or "collapse" your layers while you work? If you have a different technique, what do you feel are their advantages/disadvantages?

Question2:
Do you have custom Painter brushes that you would like to indicate to us? I want to make a set of custom brushes, and I was wondering what your favourites are (possibly 5-10), and for what purpose you usually use each for?

Final Comment:
Thank you for your patience and time to help all of these artists here, if I lived in California, I would sign up for your classes in an instant. You are an inspiration to many, including myself!

depleteD
04-07-2005, 12:59 AM
"Talent, talent, talent. Really your past formal education or lack thereof means very little to getting a decent job. Your experience is important, but being pleasant and have great skills is the key combination to sucess."


Hey Scott,

Thats really cool that you take the time to help out this community. Props man.

My school is garbage they dont teach me anything, Im at a degree mill pretty much. But it is a University and if I manage to pass I will end up with a Fine Arts Degree in New Media.

I have prolly a 2.0 GPA so I'm barely passing, but I spend all my time practising my art. Seriously, like 24-7.(It's why I'm barely passing). How recognized is a degree in this New Media field?

And how do I break in to places that say Minimum 2 years XP ( pretty much all of them),


Thanks for your time man.

-ANdrew

Scott_Robertson
04-07-2005, 04:33 AM
from: BC1967,
I was wondering what your toughts were on the the subject of the influnce of matreials on design. It seems as manufactured and refined materials have improved in composition, strength, and the ease with which they can be formed into shapes, industrial design has moved ever closer to pure organic forms.
Now that we're close to the limits of our technology to create and manipulate these manmade materials ( barring any leap in nanotechnology in the near future ), do you think industrial design will begin looking back to it's own history for influnces in the future, as opposed to nature.

I don't have a lot of time tonight, as I still have some prep for a series of lectures I'm giving in Vancouver BC comencing tomorrow. I hope to be able to find some good response time on Saturday.

Here is one at least...

I would think that for nostalgic reasons some designers will continue to do what has been coined "retro" design, others will try to emulate nature and courageous few will experiment with the truly orginal. Retro design is very marketable due to the fact that it makes people feel good, regardless of what it is made of. The forms are very familar, and they do not visually challenge anyone. It is like seeing an old friend. Even with new materials this will remain the case. As new materials make their way into mass production I think we will hopefully see more of the conceptual designs that we have seen in 2D for so long become real objects. It seems to be what has happened throughout our history. And as we all know history is a great forcaster of the future.

Comments on the artwork...

It would appear from the foreground lights on the sphere that there is a lot of atmosphere present due to the strength of the light beams and so I feel that the background buildings have too much contrast. Try adding some more atmosphere back there to knock them back and or lower the amount of haze in the foreground. Also it might be nice to experiment with something in the extreme foreground. One last thought, double check the perpsective of the ring building supporting the sphere as it looks a bit sketchy, unless that was the intent.

Scott_Robertson
04-07-2005, 04:49 AM
from: tonich03,

Q I am only 16 year old,and i know i still have a way to go,i was drawing really a lot lately,especially sketching,learning photoshop etc. all by myself.I wasnt thinking of getting to be an artist because my mother is,and advises me to get another job,as this may be very risky.After all not averybody has success.Though she doesnt know anything about the cg,and the way it could be used(webs etc.)So i was thinking of studying something else first,then art.
Do you think this makes sense?i enjoy drawing,so i think it wont be a major problem going to an art school after getting any other degree.Do you think going to an art school is crucial about getting a good job,having a nice portfolio?

You are still young enough to have many careers over your lifetime. But really your life will be longer and you'll be happier doing what you love first. No job is secure. I have always chosen freedom in my career over money and working for someone else. It can be a tough road to travel sometimes but untimately much more rewarding. If you have family obligations though things may have to progress at a slower pace but keep your head up and pursue your passion.

Scott_Robertson
04-07-2005, 04:55 AM
from: ArYeS,
Do you prefer 2D car renders or 3D car renders?

I'm going to have to go with both, but as you might guess I come down on the side of the 2D pieces more than the 3D. I like to know that someone drew an image with their hands and created the illusion of 3D with their knowledge of perpsective, light, shandow, and material indication. The thing that is tough to pull off in 3D is the abilty to vary and manipulate the physics of light to best show off the design you have created. Also I prefer illustrated images over photo realistic ones.

Scott_Robertson
04-07-2005, 05:18 AM
I think that's it for tonight.

I have just finished reading all of the questions and I'll start to formulate some hopefully helpful answers over the next day or two.

Cheers,

S.

Jezzarts
04-07-2005, 07:50 AM
Hey Scott,
I'm making a career change from being a graphic artist to a concept artist. Freelance work
has been going very well but I have little time to draw at night after work and am not making enough from it to quit my job.... so I am going to do a degree full time.

My question is, what degree would you recomend? I have been considering 3D animation or Fine Art but I see that you studied Industrial Design... Is this the obvious choice for Concept Artists?

Thanks!

madman1352000
04-07-2005, 08:23 AM
Hey Scott,

Love your art and DVDs it's great to have a pro take the time out and do all the books,dvds,taking questions that you and the other artists have done for people like myself.

I know people have asked about what you learn in doing ID design. I just wondering more about your answer. Like in saying you can look at something and seeing how it works, are you saying that you really know how it does work? like if I want to draw buildings do I have to know about floor plans or cars do I need to know how an engine is all put together? Also is there books out there that teach these things? Do you just study the shapes and that's all? Basicly I just want to know what books and such should I get since I want to study at home...maybe ones you learned from at school.

I was also wondering what other books and dvds that are coming from Design studio press? Is Feng's artbook/sketchbook still coming out? any other books from other artists? Hopefully not to many questions but I was also wondering on the Iain McCaig dvds he says to look forward the 5th dvd..are you getting him do some more?

-nate

Bluemilk
04-07-2005, 10:17 AM
Hi Scott

Was wondering what your take was on the fact that alot of concept designers for films and video games seem to be trained illustrators rather than designers, you being the one of the few exceptions, what do you think works best.
I have a degree in Product design and am just finishing a Ma in vehicle design and am interested in working in the entertainment industry, do you think employers would be interested in seeing good design or rather highly illustrive(sp?) drawings?

thanks
Paul

bequer
04-07-2005, 03:30 PM
Hi Scott
Thanls for this opportunity
How big in pixels is this image.

http://www.designstudiopress.com/forum/vbulletin/showthread.php?threadid=423

What is your photoshop resolution working set up, 1000 pixels wide to start and then up to add detail? Please let me know
Really impressive work.

B

droidzlander
04-07-2005, 05:51 PM
Hi Scott.
Are you and the people at Design Studio Press planning to reprint the hardcover edition of CONCEPT DESIGN? I've tried also on Amazon but it didn't worked. Definitely that book looks like a real must-have.
Cheers

Tomasis
04-07-2005, 06:36 PM
Which books do you recommend? If one wants to be able learning to draw and paint vehicles especially cars. When is your book "how to draw vehicles" coming? Do you know some good books about perspective, rendering from another authors as complements? best cheers

Supervlieg
04-07-2005, 06:49 PM
Hey Scott,

Your work is great, you always make me want to draw more. Anyway, on with the question.

What areas do you feel yourself lacking, what part of your work or techniques would you like to improve from where you are now? Just curious I guess. Keep up the good work.

Supervlieg
04-07-2005, 06:59 PM
I also have a question about a tutorial the "how to draw cars the hotwheel way" book. There is a little tutorial in there about the technique you use to "build" cars. How do you keep those help lines you draw to get the shape right from mixing?

I always tend to lose track on what lines go where. The tutorial has nice color coded lines, but when using a pencil and paper it's hard to differentiate the lines. Do you work on a big paper so the lines have enough space to themselves or maybe something else? Please enlighten me. Thanks.

deadline
04-07-2005, 08:42 PM
Oh yea. I am a big fan of your work. Admire it on many levels. Very inspirational and great for reference (if you don’t mind) :thumbsup:

Ch3
04-08-2005, 12:14 AM
Hi Scott,

I am currently studing computer animation but I am also interested in drawing and design. The main reason I chose this field, is the hope that one day I will be able to make some living out of something that started as hobby. Also, as it is something creative, I believe it wont easily become boring after many years of work.

I was wondering, whether such a successful career, has increased or not your interest and joy of drawing? Are there times you feel your job becoming a routine? or the differences between projects keep the interest high? Do you enjoy every project you do, or there are some which dont motivate or even challenge you?
As far as I know, working hours and deadlines in this industry can become quite stressful which can take all the pleasure of any activity.

And just by curiosity, after so many car designs you have done, what car do you drive?

Thank you for your time.

Reepoman
04-08-2005, 08:52 AM
Hi Scott,

At what point in your career did you realize that you where starting to become a bit of a celebrity in the Art world?

bequer
04-08-2005, 09:32 AM
Hi Scott
Can you critique this work I have done to get a better hold of Painter and Photoshop. I have done this using reference. Working hard on original stuff right now. Trying to get a hold of clear coats and metallic matt finishes. I will appreciate any comments in material indication rendering, lighting and composition.

Full design credit one of my favorite artists Mr Syd Mead, from Sentinel book, changed atmosphere, lighting and colors:

http://img25.exs.cx/img25/5114/ROAD_WEB.jpg

Ferrari Dino in matt metalic and clearcoat:

http://img25.exs.cx/img25/8695/DINO_MATE_WEB.jpg
http://img38.exs.cx/img38/6873/DINO_WEB.jpg

Regards
B

Scott_Robertson
04-09-2005, 04:47 PM
from: Tr@ceR,
How do you come up with these designs? I know that that is not an easy question to answer but I often have a hard time thinking up nice concepts. Artist's block is something that I experience often and I'm just wondering if you experience the same thing. If so, how do you overcome it?

ScoRo - I think it is a combination of things all coming together to make it easy to do endless design variations for any subject. Here are a couple of ideas on the subject. Travel and observe, when you are having trouble coming up with ideas do something else and usually you will be inspired to return to your design exercises. Things you might consider, head out to a museum, drop in on some of your friends to see what they are doing, join in on one of the many cool forum competitions, go see a movie, read, take a hike and try to mentally record serval new visual observations you had never thought of or looked closely enough to have seen in the past. In addition I really have to credit my ID education. In industrial design we were continually critiqued on the lack of originality in our deisgns if any existed. Also part of this education is to equip young designers with a powerful toolbox of methods they can apply to more easily create objects of their own design that the rest of the world has never seen before, or at least this is the ultimate goal.

Hope this helps you out.

Scott_Robertson
04-09-2005, 06:54 PM
From: Jvaughan,
Given your usual rendering style is very tight, do you usually go through your entire process for digital works? For those not as familiar, do you completely set up and and do free hand perspective on everything prior to switching to digital, or do you work more loosely and then refine your perspective construction as your work, using just rough guides to start?

ScoRo – Thanks, good question. It depends on what I’m doing, but I usually find it easier to do my design work with traditional media and then scan these drawings to do the color rendering in Photoshop. It is hard for me to paint in color and do good ID work at the same time. I do work up designs digitally though with no prior line drawing to work over, but these are usually pretty sketchy. I find that this easier with environments than with other objects. It is interesting though that as the digital sketch starts becoming a piece I might want to make tighter I often find myself printing the piece at this point with a bunch of perspective guidelines on the top layer so I can refine the design with a traditional media line drawing overlay. After this I scan the new drawing back into the computer and scale it to match my rendering and if the line quality is nice or I want to show the lines as part of the style of the rendering I switch the line drawing layer to multiply so I can float it on top.

Scott_Robertson
04-09-2005, 06:54 PM
From: Sykosys,
Sometimes clients can be ... absurd in their demands. In your case, I would expect that you'd get some freedom, but have you ever had a client that you simply could not please? And, for that matter, have you ever had to tell a client to go stuff themselves in an impolitely described hole somewhere, because of their expectations?

ScoRo - I guess I do get a bit more freedom now than I did 15 years ago, but if you are doing freelance design work one of the most important things to remember is that it is their money and they have the right to spend it however the please. I do like to think that one of the reasons they hired me in the first place is that they are also interested in my opinions of their project. I share these in a polite way but I do not press if they are unresponsive to a change of direction. I think one way to avoid the frustration with poorly conceived and directed, design jobs is to always try and schedule a portion of your day to pursue personal projects. If you can do this it makes spending time on a client’s idea that you may or may not agree with a much easier task. Also on the idea of doing consulting work try very hard to keep your overhead as low as possible so are in a position to say NO to the jobs that really do not interest you.

Scott_Robertson
04-09-2005, 06:55 PM
From: MWarsame,
I am a student still and was wondering, in your point of view, do you think breaking in the industry either Animation or game industry has gone harder, if so, what would you advice us to do to prepare?

ScoRo – I like to say that there will always be good jobs for good talent. I think that breaking into the game industry is easier that the animation world and easier than it has ever been. The game industry is currently on a roll and with the resolution improving once again on the next generation of consoles there will continue to be a growing demand for good designers as game companies look for newer content and the experience of game play inches closer to the feature film experience. If you really want to work in the entertainment design field you currently will have the best opportunities if you can do original designs illustrated to a high level covering primarily environments, characters and to a lesser extent vehicles and props. Also try to design these subjects for story lines which take place in the past, present and future.

Scott_Robertson
04-09-2005, 06:56 PM
From: scottsch,
Is your book "How to Draw Vehicles" going to be out this year?

ScoRo – I just hired some more help at Design Studio Press, which if all goes well should free me back up to complete my books by the end of the year.

From: scottsch,
I have some questions about the content: Is it going to include color rendering lessons, and is it going to have a section on creating vehicles from scratch - focusing on the design aspects of the car, not just the drawing technique?

ScoRo – Yes, it looks like it will be two books right now. The first covering drawing, design and matte surface shading. The second will cover material indication and color rendering with both traditional and digital media. Most likely the first book I will finish will be Drawthrough 1, a collection of my past work loaded with hundreds of new sketches not many have seen before.

From: scottsch,
What types of objects from the real world (i.e. reference material) do you bring into the creative vehicle design process - or do you just make everything up as you go? I watched the Gnomon DVD on hovercraft - and the main thing I got from it was that I was watching an artist that was highly experienced and had a lot of ideas about form committed to memory. I can honestly say I've never seen anyone draw like that before - you were pulling things out of thin air while most other artists I watch are looking at reference when they draw. So, just wondering what some of these influences are that feed the idea process. Do you spend a lot of hours drawing from reference, or do you try to be creative as much as possible? In school they teach people to draw from reference as much as possible, but when you try to switch to making things up and being creative, it's not exactly an automatic thing. Are there some tricks to making the transition from copying what you see to actually inventing forms?

ScoRo – Good questions and observations on the problems with learning how to draw by only working from reference. I usually only pull reference to work from if I need to design to a specific historical time period. When I’m practicing my drawing skills I do not work from reference. I prefer to try and create forms from my own imagination. One of the problems of trying to learn to draw by using reference or from observation only is that you really do not need to know anything about perspective drawing to achieve high quality drawings. If you can visualize what you are looking as flat 2D shapes it is a matter of redrawing these shapes to depict what you are observing. When you are then asked to draw something of your own design from your imagination you quickly realize that this is something that you will have actually never done, and as a result you may struggle. If on the other hand you spend most of your time drawing without reference you will have developed a method to create forms from your imagination. This of course requires a very different set of drawing skills and is much more about mentally building models with a 3D eye versus a 2D shape-copying eye.

From: scottsch,
Is industry demand for traditional concept artists/designers (people who draw, more so than people that are in 3D production) as high as it used to be, or lower, or is demand getting much stronger now for good concept designers?

ScoRo – As I talked about a couple of posts back I think there will always be good jobs for good talent. In terms of workload in the development of a game there is a lot more to do in the 3D area of course but you need great content first and the fastest way to get to that is via 2D concept designers and the skills they bring. I think the demand for these individuals is growing as companies and studios search for visually stronger content.

Scott_Robertson
04-09-2005, 06:57 PM
From: crossbones,
Who invented drawing through?

ScoRo – It dates back to the original artists who first conceived of and developed the perspective skills we still use today. If my memory serves me correctly I think that the latin definition for word for term perspective means, “to see through”.

GRK
04-10-2005, 09:50 PM
Hey Scott!

I've been watching the dvd's day and night. Great, great stuff.

I've just moved to LA from Turkey (Computer Science wasn't doing it for me so i wanted to start over, in a new place) and im attending a community college right now. I'm thinking of working hard, coming up with some good skills and applying to Art Center College transportation design. Unfortunately, my school doesn't offer many classes that will help me prepare a portfolio for the major im applying for. I think my best shot is to get help from dvds, other instructional stuff and the internet to develop my skills (drawing day & night right now. long way to go :)) but you think is there anywhere else i can get help from? Does art center offer classes for students not attending art center college? I should probably meet up with a counselor but since you're here and im now a fan, thought i could ask. Thank you and take care!

Gurkan

francis001
04-11-2005, 05:06 AM
Hey Scott

I hope I am not too late to add to the queue. Didn't realize this new forum was going on, pretty cool idea.

Your publishing company seems to be rolling along great, and you are doing all of us a great service by bringing out books and instructional DVDs that have in the past been scarce or difficult to come by. I was wondering if you foresaw doing something like this when you were in school, or even when working during the last several years?

From your previous posts and in talking to you at other times I get the impression that the publishing side is at least a full time gig, and you have little or no time these days to actually sit down and do art. Are you happy being a publishing mogul, or do you at some point want to delegate some of that work so you can go back to being a designer/artist?

Thanks Scott

Francis

Leonard
04-11-2005, 07:56 AM
OK guys. Last chance to ask Scott any questions. We're going to archive this thread at the close of 11 April 2005.

Cheers,

Leonard

Lunatique
04-11-2005, 08:19 AM
Scott skipped mine and said he was going to answer it later, but I think he forgot about it. :D

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 05:06 PM
From: Ecthelion
How can i, being a decent artist and designer, strive most efficiently toward artwork like yours? More specifically, what can i do to understand perspective artwork, and shapes in space? Any books that helped you?

ScoRo – First it really requires a lot of hard work, which I’m sure you are up to task. A strong understanding of perspective drawing, design and styling principles will get you started in the right direction. In addition to the books both Ballistic Publishing and Design Studio Press are putting out check out our DVDs at www.thegnomonworkshop.com look under the Analog heading for DVDs on the subjects you are asking about. In addition I think that John Montague has a decent book on perspective drawing called Basic Perspective Drawing. For a basic start at how to do cars I think my How to Draw Cars the Hotwheels Way will give you a nice introduction. Frequent the on-line forums and continue to ask questions. Most people are usually willing to help out.

Best of luck.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 05:07 PM
From: destroyfred
I just want to know what was your work on Minority Report Feature film (i love this !). And just for the fun do you know some french CG school ? what do you think about french artists (french touch) ?

ScoRo – On Minority Report I worked on about a dozen futuristic bicycle designs, only one of which made it on screen for about a second! Also I designed the wheelchair for the warden of the containment center. James Clyne, Mark Goerner, Harald Belker, and Neville Page did most of the work for the film that was actually on screen. I’m not really up on which schools are doing what right now in France, sorry. I really like some French artists, Sparth, Beat and Bengal have to be my current favorites, of and I cannot forget Stephan Martiniere! You need to start bottling that special French touch.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 05:08 PM
From: icedeyes
I am a big fan of your work and I own two gnomon dvds that you made (love them by the way)... just wanted to say i love your work and ask if you knew of any good university for industrial design (other than the one you went)...

ScoRo – Thanks. I have tried to put together a list of design schools on the links page of www.designstudiopress.com for students to check out schools from all over the world.

Hope this helps.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 05:35 PM
From: Lunatique,
I'd like to know your thoughts on the history/trends of industrial/entertainment design. It seems that the current generation is mostly influenced by Syd Mead, from his marker rendering style to the design sensibility. But of course Syd Mead isn't the only designer in the history of industrial/entertainment design. What are some of the other pioneers and innovators that you think deserves more notice, and how would you describe the various trends in the modern history of industrial/entertainment design? (For example, the 70's was dominated by boxy designs, then that gave away to emphasis on curves and more aerodynamic looks.)

ScoRo – I haven’t forgotten, just getting to it. I would agree that the current older generation which I would classify as us designers nearing 40, were all influenced by Syd’s work. He really was for a long time one of the only ones we had to be inspired by while going to school in the late eighties. Some of my other personal favorites are John Berkey, Steven Olds, the first Star Wars guys such as Joe Johnston, Ron Cobb, Nilo Rodis-Jamero, and Ralph McQuarrie. In regard to the history of trends in the entertainment design field I think designers have just started to realize that there is more to be done than what we have all seen in Star Wars, and Blade Runner. In the past, and probably into the future, entertainment will most likely be driven by artists who have a strong design background and so as a result most designs will still remain fairly familiar projections of our future. In part this is due to the “decision-makers” lacking a true desire for originality. I really think the most promising place to look for the most creative designs in future will be in books. The risk of investment loss is small and so therefore the creative risks and experiments can be great. I think that the design trends shared through these books will venture into new aesthetics, which will hopefully make us very uncomfortable due to the fact that they will be so fresh.

From: Lunatique,
On a side note, I don't know if you're familiar with Yamashita Ikuto's works. I highly recommend his manga series "Dark Whisper," published by Bandai (there are only two volumes). His design sense is very slick and very beautiful. Dark Whisper has never been translated and published in English, so you'll have to hunt them down from Japanese online bookshops or local ones in your area. Yamashita is currently most known for his mechanic designs on the anime series Neon Genesis Evangelion.

ScoRo – I have seen the Neon Genesis Evangelion series and I like the mechanical bots that he has done. I’ll try and find the books, thanks.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 05:42 PM
From: Artbot,
Are you at a point in your career where you no longer have to actively chase after jobs (in other words, clients seek you out)?

ScoRo – When I’m not to busy working on books, DVDs and teaching and I want to do some consulting work it is a bit easier but I still need to show a portfolio and decide if I have the skills to help the client with their requests.

From: Artbot,
I'm been an artist in the games biz for 13 years and would like to do more freelance illustration work (3D, 2D, Photo manipulation, or mixed) on the side. Got any tips on the easiest way to find potential clients? I'm a fellow ACCD ID grad, but have been out of the commecial illustration loop for a long time.

ScoRo – I’m not really the one to help on this, sorry. I think you have the first right step though, which is a web site, now you just need to get it in front of the right people. Might be a good question on some of the more illustration based forums?

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 05:49 PM
from: alexqwerty,
I always wanted to ask you whether you have any recommendation for beginners. I'm aiming at getting a job in 3D modelling or concept design in US within 2-3 years. Can design skills be self-taught or must I attend college?

ScoRo – Advice for beginners, is to really focus on your foundation skills and practice as much as possible. I do know a few self-taught designers and they are very good, but I think they could have gotten to where they are now a lot faster had they attended a good school for the subject.


from: alexqwerty,
I from Australia, i wish I can attend your college. Hope you'll release more DVD in the future regarding the subject of Lighting and Shading

ScoRo – That is one of the topics I hope to complete a DVD series on this summer, stay tuned.

Cheers.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 06:00 PM
from: kraal,
Sans school placement what is the best way to get a job as a concept artist for film, television, or games? I have been able to get work with comics due to the fact that you can approach a company during a convention or they have open submissions, ect. Is there such a thing for film work? I know the talent needs to be there I am more curious about the initial open door opportunity.

ScoRo – Thanks. Unfortunately the film job is really hard to get, at least here in LA due to the union. You have to be in the union to work on most films in LA and the union is accepting no new members. Due to this I think the most promising place to find concept design work is in the game industry. It is a healthier industry right now and everything they create is from scratch unlike most films which are shot with real people and at real places. The best way to get into the game world is to put your work on your own web site and then hit all on the forums to start getting the word out that you are looking for work.

Best of luck.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 06:09 PM
from: plaf,
In connection with my previous question, I've got one about portfolios as well. When applying for jobs, I've usually included a broad range of stuff : sketches, finished 2d art, low and high poly 3d models, textures and animations. This has burned me a few times, since it seems some studios get confused by this and prefer single-function artists that focus solely on one aspect of production
- whereas I think being an all-rounder is a good thing, especially if you show some proficiency at all of them (I guess it's up to the studios to judge that, though )

Anyways. My question is: would you recommend compiling a portfolio single-mindedly, showing off only stuff that's directly relevant to the position you're applying for, or would you include other things to show off your range as well? To what extent do movie studios appreciate all-rounders?

ScoRo – My basic approach to portfolios is to first show only the type of work you want to get hired to do. Next you can widen the range of want you show, especially if it is for a small company that would need the same person to do a wide range of tasks. The larger the company usually the more specific each designers job will be.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 06:21 PM
from: skullmonkeys,
Your DVDs helped me a lot. They are the best learning material I've seen on perspective drawing.
My question
When designing any fast moving vehicles, I'd assume you have to have knowledge of aerodynamics to a certain degree or mechanical engineering if you are designing a machine/robot. How do you balance the technical and design aspect in your designs? How much knowledge of the technical is required when doing ID. Are there any good books/resources you can recommend specifically for designers?

ScoRo – Basically the more you know about your subject matter the easier it is to make the one you are designing look like it might work. This also can work against you as the tendency will be to make it look too much like what you already know. It is almost like you need to know a lot about a specific thing are trying to design and then you want to forget about this when you start designing your version. A good working knowledge of your subject will allow you to add enough engineering realism to make objects of your own design look better. I do not know of any specific books on the subject. Your best bet is to find books on each subject that you are interested in designing and then going from there.

from: skullmonkeys,
I guess one of the things you can do is copy vehicles/machines and build up your visual library?

ScoRo – Yeah, that’s the right idea.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 06:50 PM
from: Pauleeeee,
I've been doing the whole CG thing now for about two years now while attending a degree course (which I don't think is very good but I'll stick it out just to get that piece of paper). My problem is that I find I keep on going from one area to another (2D to 3D...modelling to some animation...and even programming.)
I would really like to focus on one area and become as much of an expert at is as I can because I'm aware that alot of places aren't looking to employ a jack of all trades kind of guy.

So basically my question is: When you were starting to learn over the first few years did you find it hard to focus on one area like me or were you always very focused on the 2D design end of things?

ScoRo – When I returned from teaching at Art Center Europe in ’96 I was doing a lot of freelance ID work and I was doing 2D and 3D work. I reached a point where there were so many options of software programs to pursue learning that I felt myself being spread to thinly and not being able to produce a high level of quality with any one skill so I decided to focus on purely 2D work and give up all of the 3D pursuits. The best guys at any given skill usually only do that skill and if you want to be able to compete with them then you usually have to follow suit just to have enough time committed to the craft so you can reach your fullest potential.

Scott_Robertson
04-11-2005, 06:54 PM
from: fabmedia,
My question is that I'm a self-employed graphic designer and I'm creating more and more 3D models for animation or rapid prototyping for either other studios/companies (sub-contract), or illustrations for my own clients (directly). Graphic design is becoming a very small part of my business (currently about 20-30%). I'm wondering if I should look at staying in business for myself, or should I look at jumping into the TV/ Film industry? I would like to jump into either industry, but it comes down to finances. Currently I make only $35-40K CDN/ year but is it worth it?

ScoRo – I’m not sure I can help you much with this one. The only thing I know is if you can try and do what you love, the job won’t seem like work. With all of the jobs I taken due to the fact that they were well paying ones the fun of the money wore off long before the job was complete.

pongball
04-11-2005, 07:57 PM
Hi Scott, I was wondering if you could answer my question from page #4 if you've gotten around to it? You missed me!! Thanks :scream:

Leeru
04-12-2005, 09:22 PM
Hi Scott. I've been following your work for a while. I read on your site that the book “Basic Perspective Drawing” by John Montague is pretty good. I was wondering if you had any other recomendations for books that you found helpful in that past in regards to developing perspective drawing skills.

Thanks :D

scottsch
04-12-2005, 11:51 PM
Just wanted to say before the thread is closed... Thanks to Scott Robertson for taking the time to answer so many questions and good luck with the books.

Leonard
04-13-2005, 12:17 AM
A big thank you to Scott Robertson for taking the time to answer questions and critique work! Sorry if anyone had their questions missed, but we do have to close this Q&A session now. Thanks all for participating!

Best,

Leonard