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noShame
03-28-2005, 08:04 PM
Hello all.

Am 19 years old, and I cant draw sh*t but I would like to be able to draw like the leading concept artists. I am aware of that it takes practice and that they have been drawing for many years, heres my question. Do you believe that anybody can learn to draw? Is it too late for me to start lerning now, when I am 19? I believe that nobody is born to draw, some have better imagination then others, but isnt the ability to draw just like to speak or write? Or is it something in the great artists genes / brain that others dont have?

If it isnt something you are born with, a talent. If it is generated by trial and error, does everybody have equal chance in getting good at drawing, no matter age? For example, if I would start to learn a foren language at this age, i wouldnt be able to learn it as quick/good as i would when i was about 10, do you think its the same with drawing? Many of the good artists have been drawing at young ages, is it harder to learn to draw when one is 15+?

As i sead, i am 19 years old and my drawing skills are limited. I understand the basics of drawing, the propotions and perspectives, and it looks so easy when feng and the others at gnomons concept videos does it, but when i start drawing lines on the paper everything goes wrong. The propotions are messed up, the perspective is wrong, line quality really bad etc. Do I have any chance in learning to draw properly, in 1,5,10 years? Or should I just give up since iv started this late and just admire those who really can draw.

Sorry for bad grammar and spelling,
Boris

Spater
03-28-2005, 08:13 PM
anyone can learn to draw, I didn't start until I was 18, all it takes is practice practice and more practice, draw images you see in magazines, draw whatever you see, draw as often as you can and draw whatever you can, don't stop studying how light falls on objects.

cyartist
03-28-2005, 08:20 PM
Just draw you'll get better

Troy
03-28-2005, 08:37 PM
If you really want to then you can do it, Jason Manley of conceptart.org started when he was 19 I think, and i know it's nice to know how others did it, but just find your own way and draw non stop.

endless
03-28-2005, 08:39 PM
I was in your position just a few months ago - wondering if drawing talent is innate and if I should bother training that skill. Through threads on this site, I found this book:

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0874774241/qid=1112041947/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/103-4786434-9638257?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)

and I would wholeheartedly recommend it if you can find it or buy it online. The book will help that lightbulb above your head turn on, but keeping it powered will still be a matter of practice.

My drawing skills have improved in a short time - while it's still crap, it's leaps and bounds ahead of where I was half a year ago. Practice makes perfect, but knowing what/how to practice was the key for me.

AIPh Pretzel
03-28-2005, 08:54 PM
Just draw you'll get better

This man has the correct answer.

emptyvoxel
03-28-2005, 08:54 PM
I didn't have a formal drawing class until I was in my 20's, but I scribbled and doodled in the margins of my papers my whole life. I was amazed at how much my technique and personal style emerged under instruction, rather than just drawing on my own.
There are those who have an incredible natural gift for drawing, and your typical concept artist probably started out amazing their grade school teachers with their artistic abilities. Drawing is just like any other thing: you get better at it with practice, and some will be better at it than others. It's important not to set your bar too high and to realize that it's going to take a while. You wouldn't pick up a cello at age 19 and say "I'm going to play the Dvorák cello concerto like Jaqueline du Pré," and neither should you pick up a pencil and say "I'm going to draw cool robots like Feng Zhu. RIGHT NOW!"
I suggest you start out taking a drawing class, or at least pick up a drawing book and practice, practice, practice. I know it sounds totally lame, but start out by practicing drawing in perspective, drawing lines to your horizon points and all that good stuff that any "beginning drawing" book will tell you about. Draw cubes in perspective, or spheres, or cones, or any primitive shapes, then slowly move onto more difficult subject matter. If you draw from a photograph, flip the photograph upside down and then draw it. It will help your brain really look at the photo objectively, and help you define the true shape rather than what your brain perceives.

Anyway, good luck. Keep drawing!

~T

JARhead
03-28-2005, 08:55 PM
You should try and take classes at a local community college, I here from a lot a people that I've talked to, that they went in there not knowing how to draw at all, and now they do it for a liveing. But that can only go so far, pratice, pratice, and more pratice is required to become better at it.

I do think anyone can learn to draw, paint and do cartwheels upside down on top of a plane while riding a uni-cyicle if they have the will to do so. Look into a few books, perhaps some one to teach you a few things personaly, and pratice evry night. You dont have to try and make a whole master peice evrynight, you can just doodle.

You can even post your stuff on this here website in the WIP forums and get it critiqed. Dont worrie what people will think about what you post, the fact is you are going to be told what is wrong with your picture, and then you will know what to do to correct it and perhaps not make the same mistake twice. I have found that being hard on your self and not taking other peoples crits personaly but seriously will improve your work a lot.

I would start out by doing a lot of sketching, I've found this to be a huge peice to improvment. Also when sketching dont just sketch the same thing in the same position over and over, but mix it up a bit, make it more intresting so you and who ever looks at your sketches wont become bord with the work.

Just a few thoughts, theres a lot more to it then that, but Im sure you know that. Good luck to ya! I hope you will get to were you are going. And welcome to CGtalk! :D

FootFace
03-28-2005, 08:57 PM
Well my friend, I'm 22 and I still don't know what I wanna do with my life.
I recently started drawing, and doing some digital painting in Photoshop.
I will tell you that 2 months ago I could barely draw stick figures with life, and now I'm drawing landscapes and figures. I'm certainly not good but I am getting much much better.

Please draw. Never ever consider yourself too old to start doing something. I'm sure you are aspiring to be a illustrator/animator or something. Just keep in mind that you'll probably change your "career" many many times in your life.

Life is a complete waste of time and you should just do whatever the hell you please.
:)

kyphur
03-28-2005, 09:04 PM
Chuck Jones once said, "Anyone can draw, it's just getting past the first 10,000 bad drawings..." :D

So if you do 2D animation you'll get there a good bit faster. I know when I was doing 2D animation and pumpiing out a couple of hundred sheets a day that I was improving weekly. Just wish I was still doing that.

Even if you're doing simple shapes you're still training your muscular memory and control to be able to do things that you couldn't do before. Take a small book with you wherever you go and work in it when you're waiting on something. This can be anything from going to a restraunt and waiting for food to going and sitting on the toilet. Your mind can always find stuff for you hands to do so put them to use even if it is drawing something simplistic as triangles, boxes, spheres and simple shading techniques. If you work hard enough you'll see things happen week to week. Even if I have to put down the pen for a week I can tell that I need to loosen up next time I draw again.

Hope that helps.

rock on

noShame
03-28-2005, 10:20 PM
Hey, thanks for all your posts, now I got my hopes up again!
Im really glad that I still have a chance, I'll do as you say, draw as much as I possebly can. I'v heard about "drawing on the right side of the brain" and its supposed to be really helpful for beginners, so thats defenitly something for me. I am just about to finis "gymnasiet" here in sweden, I think its the same as highschool, so now I can choose a collage as a concept artist and really improove my drawing skills.

Once again, thanks alot for all your posts, now Im right back on track and motivated!

Kind regards,
Boris

Dirtystimpy
03-28-2005, 11:17 PM
http://www.sangjunart.com/


my friend told me the other day he didn't even pick up a pencil until his mid 20's!

mr_wowtrousers
03-28-2005, 11:27 PM
If that fellow from conceptart.org is the one I am thinking if, his progression was amazing! Is he the one who kept on online visual diary and posted something every day? If I recall he started off with spheres and squares (and not particularly good ones at that) but every post you could see improvement. His latest stuff is pretty darn good.

SpeccySteve
03-28-2005, 11:44 PM
Check this thread.
http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=870&page=1&pp=60&highlight=mindcandyman

sula_nebouxi
03-29-2005, 12:38 AM
MindCandyMan is an inspiration to all people who want to become artists. He's improved more in 2 years than most people would in 10. He started out not being able to draw cups and now he can draw anything with near perfection. I should point out that he got classical training at an atelier, Pantera Studios, I believe. Personally I think you should find an atelier(a school modeled after French art academies). They specialize in classical art techniques and can push you in the right direction. Check out www.artrenewal.org for a complete listing of ateliers in your area.

I didn't start drawing till I was 19 too...I don't think age matters too much. What does matter is willingness to learn and improve. And always keep positive...no one ever got anywhere by having a self-defeatist attitude, right?

Jukebox
03-29-2005, 01:13 AM
I thought i was the only one with that problem...

CGmonkey
03-29-2005, 04:30 AM
I was 19 when I "began" to really learn how to draw.

I'm 20 now, and I consider myself to draw pretty good. Not professionally, but still good enough to conceptualize my ideas.

My solution was to find something that inspires me when the road gets touch.

CodeNothing
04-06-2005, 11:46 PM
Yes you can learn, but keep in mind that the Gnomon DVD guys have been drawing and painting for 25+ years. If learning to draw were a 3 month course and a DVD rental, everyone would be an incredible artist.

Every begining artist wants to know the "secret" that will make everything easy. There must be some tecnique or trick that artists dont tell anyone.

but there is no magic bullet. No top secret knowlage passed down by artists. The only thing i can offer that comes close is Dont fall into bad habbits. Take art classes, and listen to the teacher. Dont think "well i have a better way" or "well ill just do things in MY style". Thats the biggest set back i see in art students. Learn all tecniques and try to mimic every style.

besides that, just hard practice. Draw/paint for at least 30 minutes a day and in a year with some help from mentors you will be about average skill level here on CG talk. Work REALY hard and in as little as 4 years i dont doubt you could have one of your works in the choice gallery here. but it all depends on how much you practice, and more importantly, how well you LISTEN to mentors.

mttjss
04-07-2005, 03:23 AM
SPECCY STEVE - THANK YOU!!! :bounce:


the post about MindCandyMan is the most awesome inspiration I have ever found.
This guy has to be an inspiration to all.

I want to be a 3d animator, but I will follow in his footsteps - if he can go from Decaprio to Davinci I can be a 3d god!!

Strive to be perfect...you may not reach perfection but you become better than you hoped for.

erilaz
04-07-2005, 03:32 AM
I've only started to take my sketching seriously in the last 3 months, drawing every opportunity I get. I've made a massive improvment just from observing and drawing every day. I date all my sketches and cringe at stuff I did a fortnight ago, which means I must be getting better somewhere along the line!

jmBoekestein
04-08-2005, 12:58 AM
Check this thread.
http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=870&page=1&pp=60&highlight=mindcandyman

awesome...

I gotta say I have only recently made my first couple of drawings with more than one colour. Loads of fun but bound to be embarassing.(I'm 25 now)

seeing the results in that thread have made me reconsider to become very serious about getting my shit/bagage/knowledge up to speed.

All those anatomy drawings! Very heplpful stuff!

erilaz
04-08-2005, 02:25 AM
(I'm 25 now)



Bah, I'm 26 and you're a far better drawer than me!:D

Kanga
04-08-2005, 04:58 AM
Hello all.

Am 19 years old, and I cant draw sh*t but I would like to be able to draw like the leading concept artists. I am aware of that it takes practice and that they have been drawing for many years, heres my question. Do you believe that anybody can learn to draw?
Everybody can draw, we are born with it.

Is it too late for me to start lerning now, when I am 19? I believe that nobody is born to draw, some have better imagination then others, but isnt the ability to draw just like to speak or write? Or is it something in the great artists genes / brain that others dont have?
Only thing you have missed out on is the passion to draw. Some people are born with this and do it from year zero, not only that they keep hard at it until they drop so you wont overtake them.

If it isnt something you are born with, a talent. If it is generated by trial and error, does everybody have equal chance in getting good at drawing, no matter age? For example, if I would start to learn a foren language at this age, i wouldnt be able to learn it as quick/good as i would when i was about 10, do you think its the same with drawing? Many of the good artists have been drawing at young ages, is it harder to learn to draw when one is 15+?
Good is very subjective. If Michelangelo tried to emulate Dr Zuess it probably wouldn't be funny at all. You will have your own style but if you want to compete with talented concept artists you are going to have to work very hard. If you find your own nich then that will be easier.

As i sead, i am 19 years old and my drawing skills are limited. I understand the basics of drawing, the propotions and perspectives, and it looks so easy when feng and the others at gnomons concept videos does it, but when i start drawing lines on the paper everything goes wrong. The propotions are messed up, the perspective is wrong, line quality really bad etc. Do I have any chance in learning to draw properly, in 1,5,10 years? Or should I just give up since iv started this late and just admire those who really can draw.
Its never too late but remeber that while you are getting better they are also. Seeing your stuff is wrong is very important it means you have a good eye. Try it you have nothing to loose. Get books and practice.

Good luck man have fun!

jmBoekestein
04-08-2005, 10:38 AM
Bah, I'm 26 and you're a far better drawer than me!:D

:DI did keep dabbling in high school, it stuck I think. Thanks!

Stahlberg
04-09-2005, 10:27 AM
For the best course on how to draw,
http://www.saveloomis.org/index.html
(it's in the sticky Art Theory thread)

Empath
04-09-2005, 03:48 PM
I can definately empathize with trying to jump into drawing...
Speaking from personal experience, in learning any skill, especially drawing, each person has a certain amount of innate ability (be it very great or very little), but what really determines your eventual ability is how hard you apply yourself.
I've been trying to explain this to people for years. I grew up half blind, dyslexic to the point of being incapable of signing my own name, with no innate talents whatsoever, and pretty much a completely useless lump of a person. By my sophomore year in highschool I had picked up, mastered, and discarded a couple dozen artistic hobbies, had been reading at a college level since I was nine, was tutoring the seniors in my physics class, designing earthquake proof skyscrapers and bridges that in miniature could hold 3000 times their own weight, was running most of a theater production by myself, and taking two martial arts.
Why? Because I wasn't satisfied with being a useless lump. So here I am, not too much later at age 17, most of the way through my first semester of college, doing better than most people in my foundation drawing classes, but still noone seems to understand I have absolutely NO innate talent, but what I do have is the drive to succeed anyway. And for the most part, I'm doing so!

Alice
04-09-2005, 04:08 PM
this one works, maybe not as basic, but its ok -> http://www.learn-to-draw.com/

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