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NastyNate
03-25-2005, 05:46 AM
I am creating a portfolio of art I have created these past 2 years I have been in college. I was wondering what would be the best way to digitize my drawings. I have tried scanning them, however, in the places where there are no pencil marks, where the drawing should be white, the computer prints off as a light, grainy grey. How do I get around this without having to spend hours cleaning the drawing in Photoshop? Any help from people who have gone through the portfolio process would be appreciated :)

halo
03-25-2005, 01:55 PM
levels, move the white point inwards :)

macling
03-25-2005, 02:14 PM
As halo said: Image- Adjust - Levels
You can adjust the contrast with more control than by going to Brightness Contrast, because you can light the grey areas while maintaining the darkness of your drawstrokes.

T-Stop
04-01-2005, 09:19 PM
Thats a good quick fix. But did you try scanning you drawings as line art. Unless you have intricately colored details than I wouldnt recommend it. With Lineart scans you have to be careful as they can be problematic because they are 1-bit scans. Make sure you scale your image to its output size while scanning. Match the resolution of the scan to the resolution of the output device. Lineart scans can be jagged so if you want you could go over them in PS or AI to make up for the loss of sharpness. If these are pencil or anything else that is shaded than use grayscale scanning to keep the tones in your artwork. Follow the same principles for lineart so you get a good output. But make your black and white point adjustments in the scan before making further adjustments in PS. Lastly you coud do it like we did in the old days and put the art on a stand and shoot it.

davpunk
04-01-2005, 10:02 PM
IM not sure thats the best way to go. Line art usually disreguards color/anti-ailiasing information and uses a threshold for interpolating the line. Which means degredation of line quality. The best way is scan it in color, use the levels or mask out the "paper" area. You want your linework and colors the best they could possibly be when you scan them in.

T-Stop
04-01-2005, 10:17 PM
Hey Dav did you actually read what I posted?

Unless you have intricately colored details than I wouldnt recommend it.

davpunk
04-01-2005, 10:23 PM
ya. buy why are you telling him about a process that doesnt work well for anything? :P hehee!

T-Stop
04-01-2005, 10:33 PM
Listen I mentioned several processes there. Lineart scanning, grayscale, or shooting it traditionally. The person makes no mention of whether the art is in color, grayscale or are schematics. Incidently these processes do work and have been used for years, if done right and with care they will minimize problems. I was simply offering help and an opinion. Just as you were so...really we shouldnt be having this convo cause this guy probably already figured out what to do.

davpunk
04-01-2005, 10:41 PM
Listen I mentioned several processes there. Lineart scanning, grayscale, or shooting it traditionally. The person makes no mention of whether the art is in color, grayscale or are schematics. Incidently these processes do work and have been used for years, if done right and with care they will minimize problems. I was simply offering help and an opinion. Just as you were so...really we shouldnt be having this convo cause this guy probably already figured out what to do.


Yup! Generally though scanning as line art is not such a hot idea. No offense, if you think of it as workflow, your killing the quality of your image at the get go, and from there you can never go backwards to better quality if you need it, so you have to rescan. Its best to scan at the highest quality possible, then degrade from that. You can create line art the same way using PS threshold- and youll always have your original to go back to- so you only have to scan once. Thats all Im sayin... :)

T-Stop
04-01-2005, 10:53 PM
It was a suggestion from stuff I did years ago, which I dont do anymore. Lineart or any drawing is not a part of my workflow anymore. I work primarily on architectural photographs now- shot 4x5, scanned in 16 bit, worked on in photoshop and outputted to either our in studio fujix pictrography printers or pegasus printers at the lab. So I am well versed in start high, stay high concept. But when I did do it I scanned artwork based on what was required of the finished product. Most time I went over the artwork in illustrator to get a vector file that was smooth so there wasnt any worry of the raster image pulling apart on me in repro. But sometimes with grayscale I simply targeted my output res scanned at that res made my corrections in the scan software. When it came time to do a little clean up there wasnt much to do, I outputted the file to wherever and turn around was expedited. But yes I understand you position and its a good one.

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04-01-2005, 10:53 PM
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