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jporter313
03-15-2005, 05:02 AM
Hey all,

I really want to start doing more digital painting and I was looking into getting a cintiq. I thought about it some more and realized, for the price of a cintiq you can get a decent tablet PC, and that way you aren't tied to office when you want to paint and you get a whole other machine rather than just an input device. My question is, does anyone have any experience using a tablet PC to paint in photoshop? I remember seeing that they have 512 levels of pressure for the pen. I'm wondering if maybe there are some pitfalls I'm not thinking of.

Array
03-15-2005, 05:25 AM
Which tablet PC in particular has variable pressure level sensitivity?

jporter313
03-15-2005, 05:41 AM
errr, well, when they first came out I went to a launch event, and they all seemed to. I think they do standard. I know my friends toshiba one does.

Shogmaster
03-15-2005, 05:43 AM
Hey all,

I really want to start doing more digital painting and I was looking into getting a cintiq. I thought about it some more and realized, for the price of a cintiq you can get a decent tablet PC, and that way you aren't tied to office when you want to paint and you get a whole other machine rather than just an input device. My question is, does anyone have any experience using a tablet PC to paint in photoshop? I remember seeing that they have 512 levels of pressure for the pen. I'm wondering if maybe there are some pitfalls I'm not thinking of.

If you do a search, there are a whole slew of threads on Cintiq vs TPC here.

To sum up though, personally, I think it's smarter to go with a Cintiq than a TPC as your main digiart platform, since Cintiq will transfer from one computer to the next, while TPC's LCD tablet is stuck with the hardware in the laptop, and when it goes (breaks down, becomes to damn slow, stolen), there goes your fancy LCD tablet.

As of 21UX, there is now a world of difference in Tablet capabilities between the Cintiqs and the Tablet PCs. 21UX will give you 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity, tilt, the upcoming pen rotation feature (yes you heard right!), and higher accuracy and screen realestate. Tablet PCs are stuck in 256 levels of pressure sensitivity, no tilt, no rotation, and alot less accuracy, not to mention that the computer hardware in them are alot weaker and harder/more expensive to upgrade.

Also, keep in mind that no laptop LCDs anywhere are beyond the 18bit color with dithering, so if you want to do color critical work, you need to work with an external monitor. At that point, your portability goes out the window.

I think TPCs are very useful for doing digital art. But I don't think it's anywhere good enough to be your main/only platform for doing them. instead, I think TPCs serve peferctly as a portable ideation/sketching/loose prep work platform.



Which tablet PC in particular has variable pressure level sensitivity?

90% of them uses the Wacom Penenabled digitizers. It's basically Wacom's old UD series sensors. They'll give you 256 levels of pressure sensitivity. Just make sure the TPC you are looking for does not require batteries in the pens, since that's a dead give away that it's not a Wacom digitizer.

jporter313
03-15-2005, 05:49 AM
thanks Shog, those are some helpful points.

jporter313
03-15-2005, 05:50 AM
Ha, I wish the 21ux was even an option. 3 Grand for a tablet is a little out of my range no matter how cool it is.

Shogmaster
03-15-2005, 05:52 AM
Ha, I wish the 21ux was even an option. 3 Grand for a tablet is a little out of my range no matter how cool it is.

It's street price is $2500, which is about the same as Tablet PCs good enough to do art on. And it'll work with whatever computer you already have.

jporter313
03-15-2005, 06:23 AM
Seems like you could do digital art on one of the lower end tablet PCs, I think the one I was looking at totalled out at around $1450 after discounts and such. That's with a pentium M 1.6 with 2MB l2 and I think it has a Geforce 5200go. Right now my workstation is an Athlon XP 1700+ with a Quadro DCC, and it runs photoshop like a champ, I would think that a tablet PC with those specs would run it at least comparably. Am I wrong? I don't need to run Maya on it, just Photoshop.

jporter313
03-15-2005, 06:25 AM
but of course there's still the other issues you raised which are totally valid.

Saurus
03-15-2005, 06:18 PM
Free yourself and get a tablet PC. Tablet PC can handle Photoshop as long as you have the memory to go with it. I would go with tablets with video card, rather than integrated video. Some people here in this forum use it to handle light 3d work. Check this out:

http://www.cartoonmonkey.com/alias.html

Shogmaster
03-16-2005, 09:44 PM
Seems like you could do digital art on one of the lower end tablet PCs, I think the one I was looking at totalled out at around $1450 after discounts and such. That's with a pentium M 1.6 with 2MB l2 and I think it has a Geforce 5200go.

That specs sounds like the Toshiba M200. How the heck did you get that down to $1450! Wow! That SOB use to go for $2500 a year back (Banias version, not Dothan). That's a good deal, as long as you know it's a reputable dealer.

Right now my workstation is an Athlon XP 1700+ with a Quadro DCC, and it runs photoshop like a champ, I would think that a tablet PC with those specs would run it at least comparably. Am I wrong? I don't need to run Maya on it, just Photoshop.

TPC runs Win XP:TPC Edition. That OS does inculde couple things that can slow down a system a tad, in comparasin to regular XP Pro, such as TIP (Tablet Input Panel). AFAIK, you cannot disable TIP and not effect the operations of the machine negatively. And also there is a know bug with the TIP that will drain RAM resources. You have to reboot every couple of days because of that, but that's not a big deal at all. The point is, TIP is a resource hog, so you do have to compensate a bit.

Having said all that, Photoshop has a pretty low CPU overhead compared to something like Painter. But what I was refering to, was more towards RAM count. If you end up doing big print jobs for clients, you'll realise that something like 1GB of RAM is too little. I have 2GB of RAM in my photoshop/painter rig, and sometimes that's too little, so having only 2 SODIMM slots in your Tablet PC will make things expensive to get enough RAM for professional (and even student) PS and Painter work. Just to give you an idea, to get 2GB of RAM with decent brand PC2700 SODIMMs will be easily $500.

But then again, you still have to deal with the fact that the screen cannot display proper 24bit image.



Free yourself and get a tablet PC. Tablet PC can handle Photoshop as long as you have the memory to go with it. I would go with tablets with video card, rather than integrated video. Some people here in this forum use it to handle light 3d work. Check this out:

http://www.cartoonmonkey.com/alias.html

I say free yourslef after you set up a proper desktop system first. Unless of course your job demands that you'd be away from your desk most of the time.

MaGn0lia
03-17-2005, 11:39 AM
TPCs are ok if you are going to do scetching on them, but I don't think they handle so well on more accurate work but then again there are different people with different hand eye coordination, I'm able to reproduce anything I can do on paper with pen just with Wacom Intuos2, I have used a cintiq and well it's as good as the intuos tablest, with well you know, obvious difference of other being a monitor and other being just a tablet.

I'd def go with cintiq since there is one problem you will run very fast, this is how you do it, take up painter, use watercolor or artist oil paints and the machine will lag after every stroke you make, it does some stutter on my comp and I'm running a AMD XP2600+ 1gig ram, so that TPC is not going to handle the fancy stuff, but basic photoshop brush things it will do as good as any.

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