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Reed247
03-14-2005, 10:59 PM
I need help painting in adobe photoshop, i really suck at it...anybody know any good books in painting in photoshop????? you can email me at reed247@mail.com

leigh
03-15-2005, 02:33 AM
If you suck at painting in Photoshop, it's because you need to learn how to paint, not how to use Photoshop. I'd recommend finding a local art school and taking some painting lessons.

erilaz
03-15-2005, 02:47 AM
And I guess the big question is, are you using a drawing tablet?

Phade
03-15-2005, 04:00 AM
you may want to take a look at this book:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1584503408/qid=1110858873/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-4040990-1360125

Farsh
03-15-2005, 07:18 AM
You can paint even with a mouse, if you bother to look at the tutorials.

jeffthomann
03-15-2005, 03:24 PM
Not sure if your question is about Photoshop techniques or painting techniques... Either way, the key is to use lots of layers, and carefully place those layers... and use both the eraser and the airbrush... make sure to also use the real brush or pen/pencil... the key is taking the time to really look at what you are trying to paint and depict it on the canvas or alternatively know a lot about design and apply those rules to the canvas (for more minimalists/surreal styles, etc.)

cha0t1c1
03-15-2005, 03:26 PM
It's all about practice, Start with the basics....

Reed247
03-15-2005, 04:46 PM
I have a good backround in painting and drawing, it's the computer part that is a problem.
I guess I need to learn how to use the layers and alpha mask to paint the image, I usually just draw and add color, but photoshop I try to paint a nice image and it looks like shit compared to what I am capable of in real life, so I am looking for a book strictly on painting in photoshop, there does not seem to be any good books about this subject...they mostly just talk about photo manipulation

Zenderquai
03-15-2005, 04:56 PM
After attending a day-long course at GDC last week ( the Don Seegmiller session for those that went too ), the best advice to begin, i think, is to draw with the most comfortable medium you have, if that's pencil, scan your image.. then start small.

a canvas of 600px long side is more than plenty, then block in colours with the 19px size brushes.. be confident and approximate with the strokes, but of course pay attention to the forms of the object you're sketching, and to how you anticipate/see light falling on the object..

then increase the canvas size with each increasing level of detail..
don't start on a 3000pixel image, that's just daft.

there was also a great trick with the healing tool on photoshop, to achieve the same effect as the blend in Painter.. Define a plain white 32x32 canvas as a pattern, then on your painting, drawn over two colours with the healing tool while it's set to "pattern", obviously - choose the pattern you just created.. it blends colours effortlessly..


Many Thanks Don.. -

I hope this helps a little


Nick.

flyingP
03-15-2005, 05:06 PM
naaaahhh PS drives me nuts too, much prefer Painter for drawing or painting to be honest

marc001
03-15-2005, 05:16 PM
The matte painting videos by Yanick Dusseault are good.

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/ydu01.html

BeckyWC
04-05-2005, 05:44 PM
Get "The Photoshop and Painter Artist Tablet Book -- Creative Techniques in Digital Painting" by Cher Threinen-Pendarvis, the author of Painter WOW books. It takes you through some painting exercies using photochop cs and painter 9. Link below:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0321168917/qid=1112719484/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-9669701-2724952?v=glance&s=books

Here is a link to samples of book and tools:

http://peachpit.com/content/downloads/peachpit/companion/0321168917/samples.html

GOTgraphic
04-06-2005, 04:19 AM
The matte painting videos by Yanick Dusseault are good.

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/ydu01.htmlYes. I've noticed that there aren't many books about painting with Photoshop. There some magazines though that feature a lot of tips and tutorials (but the problem with print-zines is that you have to get a whole bunch of them, each with a 1-2 page articale that keeps continuing). Most of the paint-with-Photoshop method media I've seen are DVD vidoes.

arona
04-06-2005, 06:12 AM
And I guess the big question is, are you using a drawing tablet?


i second that. im drawing good with pencil but never painted on computer with photoshop or anything else cause i dont have a tablet. im just going to buy one.

DyslexicDan
04-06-2005, 05:59 PM
Painting in real life and painting in photoshop are two diffrent things. Like how do you make the colors blend in photoshop, what kind of brush thingies do you use in photoshop, and where do you start.

Thats was my biggest problem. I didn't know where to start and to be honest I still would like some pointers on this stuff. All the tuts out there don't really teach you from a paining view.

Any way if I could help I would but I would like know the same thing.

Kanga
04-06-2005, 10:47 PM
Ha ha I am doing just this right now!

I don't see how anyone could paint with a mouse!
They do however, and some damn good too, I reckon a drawing tablet is the way to go tho.
I find sketching with a pencil and scanning the sketch in the fastest. You can also cut and move, rotate and scale parts of your sketch which is handy.

If you have analogue painted alot you are bound to be frustrated in the beginning.

Slow down!

Give it time.

No 2 people use this medium the same just relax and enjoy exploring this very handy tool.
I used painter for a while and it aproximates different materials better, PS is pretty good tho.

Good luck and for crissakes have fun!

Nehym
04-06-2005, 10:51 PM
It also goes farther than only getting a book about it, imo. It is a lot of trial and error and testing how the tools work and then finding how you are the most comfortable with them.

I know it is a bit frustrating to be told that but to me, it is a good part of the learning.

Just open a new file and start scribbling away, taking a tool and varying the settings and testing each of them and then you can quickly know how it works and then mix it with something else. You will also learn new things and improve your way of working each time you start to paint something new.

A number 1 rule is not to be afraid to mess up, ctrl-z is there to take care of that!

Hugh-Jass
04-06-2005, 11:10 PM
If you suck at painting in Photoshop, it's because you need to learn how to paint, not how to use Photoshop. I'd recommend finding a local art school and taking some painting lessons.

that's a strong assumption...I disagree... there are plenty of highly skilled artists that initially would be lost using photoshop to paint....

and conversely there are plenty of digital artists that'd be fumbling with oils or watercolors... at first... "where's the undo?"

I think it comes down to finding out what techniques can simulate traditional techniques (simuluating markers, ink pen , watercolors , oils...) to get started (playing with brush settings) then on top of that all the wacky goodness that the software brings that can't be done by traditional methods

-NG-
04-06-2005, 11:13 PM
I don't recommend the dusso's dvd's if your a beginner. He goes quite fast, so it will be diffucult to keep up.

Cicinimo
04-07-2005, 08:14 AM
I think I agree with Lilie the most. Trial and error is probably the best way to get a feel for photoshop's painting tools. Instructional DVDs and books will point you in a few possible directions, but there are countless ways to approach painting with photoshop. A great starting point is with the paintbrush tool with your tablet linked to opacity. I've seen some great paintings greated with only this. From there, you might want to explore the different ways you can tweak brush dynamics in CS. As you progress you'll discover alot of other tools that will help achieve the effects you're interested in. Tutorials in books and on DVD will probably be most helpful after you've played with photoshop and created a few paintings with its most basic tools.

Hugh_Jass, I agree with what you're saying, but I don't think it conflicts with Leigh's statement. It seems like you're suggesting that the leap from traditional to digital, and visa versa, takes a good amount of time and energy. This makes perfect sense, learning a new medium is always tricky. At the same time, all the knowledge of color, composition, value, etc, carries over from each. Leigh was saying that if you don't have those basic skills, you'll produce digital art that is just as bad as your traditional work.

madart
04-07-2005, 10:34 AM
Painting in real life and painting in photoshop are two diffrent things. Like how do you make the colors blend in photoshop, what kind of brush thingies do you use in photoshop, and where do you start.

I like to try and emulate (oil) painting when I'm painting digitally. I like the physical blending of the colours/oils. And to do that in Photoshop I have made a bunch of custom brushes. One that I use a lot is the blurry one in the image below. I usually start with a mid range colour and adding darker/cooler colours and lighter/warmer colours. I have a very low flow setting and 100% opacity in the brush tool bar. In the brush settings under Other Dynamics I have pen pressure and sometimes change the opacity and flow jitter.

http://www.algonet.se/~madart/web/paint.jpg

This is just a very short description of how I paint in Photoshop. Sorry have to have lunch now and then go out.....

Enayla
04-07-2005, 10:46 AM
When I first switched over to Photoshop (many years ago) I had to completely relearn my tools. It is about as easy as switching from sketching in coal to painting in water colours - you'll still have the basic knowledge of how things work (anatomy, colours, light, etc) but everything might well end up looking as if a five-year-old went ballistic with the Wacom.

Having said this, I have to agree with the thought on trial and error. Books and tutorials are all very fine, but until you get a real feel for the program, you'll be painting very clumsily. I always suggest for beginners in Photoshop to start up the first week by trying EVERY tool at hand. Try the pen and all its brushes, try the healing brush, try the dodge, try the lines, the squares, the smudge, the blur, the layers and their effects, the quick masks, try the filters - everything you can get your hands on in the program (meaning, everything) you try out, and the things you think - Oh, this is nice! about, jot down a little note how you found it and remember it for later.

Then, first week up - drop the filters and the short cuts and all the unnecessary stuff and plop down to the basics. For an entire week, sketch in photoshop using only a hard edged round brush (it's the one that's just round without being blurry) and its different functions. The third week, you'll have a pretty nice understanding of the program itself and what you can do with it. You'll be able to figure out how to combine the excessive stuff that you went wild with the first week with the nice, simple stuff you toyed with the second.

It's about learning what's good and bad about the tool you're using. A simple artist's brush outside the computer is far more approachable than Photoshop is. What one should always remember is that painting on the computer has this one great benefit to any other kind of painting: you can save different versions of every picture. So there's no reason to be afraid to try new things, sketch new stuff, angle the light in a new way or burst another colour into a painting even if you think it won't work.

Oh, and if you're looking for books, check out D'artiste, I'm one of the artists featured in it so I can't speak for my own part in it - but I know that the other guys are awesome and give some really nice advice and tips.

Best of luck to you :]

Libellula
04-08-2005, 01:48 AM
I'm kinda new in this technique, but first I had to learn to paint with the mouse, pretty hard, but that makes me learn in the difficult mode. Then I buy my tablet and it was easier. I think, the secret here is to practice, practice and practice. Maybe at first, the paintings will look kinda flat, but try to observe people, environments, sky, fabrics, leaves, everything. Look how the light interacts with all these stuff and try to reproduce it into the screen. The tutorials may help, much more if they are coming from the masters (like Enayla), but you need to find your own technique. Maybe my way to shading skin is different from other people, because I find my own way for to do it easy and fast. But I think the key is PRACTICE and OBSERVATION.

Flatuloso
04-08-2005, 02:11 AM
I really think Enayla has given the best advice. Learn your tools.

I've tried, and failed miserably several times to start on things in photoshop and get them painted to any degree of proficiency. I found that I ran into a million logistical problems and really didn't know my way around the program. After so many attempts at trying things that are ambitious, it's easy to lose heart.

The thing is, painting or drawing in real life, you are holding your tool, and can see it's immediate effects on the piece you are working on. You can watch the bristles of the brush touch the canvas, and as such it's much more intuitive to learn and is a million times more tactile.

In PS, you're using a digital brush, on digital canvas. You never really see the tool itself being used, you just have to get a feel for it. I found it extremely aggravating for quite a long time. For any of my knowledge of art, I just could not apply it in photoshop, the tools were too foreign.

I'd recommend sketching out a simple, yet interesting composition, one that wouldn't take you more than an hour or so to paint over top of. Scan that into photoshop, and scale it to a reasonable size (smallish). Then, as was suggested, try approaching it with every possible tool. And document everything really well, really retain the information that you're learning. I find that my biggest sin of working on things digitally is that I zone out while staring at the screen and don't really think to much about what I'm doing - at which point I'm just wasting so much time.

I've gone back from trying to do actual paintings to doing plain old spheres. In ten minutes I learned more than I had in an hour of trying big stuff, because I wasn't thinking so much about the picture and the complexities of composition/anatomy/light source/etc.

I know I've gone on ad naseum, but I feel like it's definitely best to start simple. Sketch out a picture you can stand to color a bunch of times, then you only need to worry about everything else once, while you focus on the task of learning the program through and through.

Kanga
04-08-2005, 03:32 AM
.....
The thing is, painting or drawing in real life, you are holding your tool, and can see it's immediate effects on the piece you are working on. You can watch the bristles of the brush touch the canvas, and as such it's much more intuitive to learn and is a million times more tactile.......
I remember we had to do an excersie for a 2D design that was drawing without rotating the page, I'm not sure what the purpose was but it was bleedin difficult!

One of the most foreign things is that in PS you don't rotate the paper like you do when you sketch. I seem to remember in painter there was a quick operation for this.

Anyhow it will take a while to get the feel, I still have trouble in PS drawing an expersive or straight line. In the end I rekon its faster for painting if you can master it.

Zack
04-08-2005, 06:45 AM
The hardest part about a drawing tablet for me is not being able to turn around. I'm always trying to make better archs by turning my paper or canvas upside down, or at a slant, or on its side. Upwards archs are so much smoother than downwards archs. You turn your drawing tablet around and everything is messed up.

I'm still learning to switch from more traditional mediums myself (my experience is in acrylics - so much cheaper than oils).

Zack

EDIT: I see others have covered this. I may end up having to buy a cintiq someday. there go my hopes of owning a car when I get my license... :\

pipecat
04-08-2005, 03:35 PM
I don't recommend the dusso's dvd's if your a beginner. He goes quite fast, so it will be diffucult to keep up.

i agree with you, its quite fast for a beginner, and he doesn't explain how it works,about type of brush etc etc but he's very good artist!!!

anim8r2
04-27-2005, 04:46 AM
Personally I wouldn't bother with PhotoShop for painting. It isn't a painting program (sure many artists use it--and some are phenomenal--but, why bother when there are much better PAINTING programs out there). PS is primarily designed for photo/image editing (I mainly use PS to clean up/enhance art created in other programs--including my 3D stuff).

Ck out Painter, you can download a trial version of Painter IX at Corel's website. And by all means, get a tablet. If you're really serious about learning, you might as well do it the easy way =]


.

rebuilder
04-27-2005, 06:22 AM
To offer a differing opinion, I prefer photoshop to painter for painting. Probably this is because I'm used to the interface, and because I don't even want to emulate "real" media on the computer.

Anyway, I'll try to offer some assistance as well:
If you use hard-edged brushes as enayla suggested, you can think of Photoshop as much like painting with really great gouaches. You could work in broad areas of colour, and then detail more. It would be good exercise to work with 100% opacity brushes and not even try to blend the colours. For gradients etc. just paint intermediary colours between the shades you want to blend together. Personally I paint almost exclusively with hard-edged brushes, and lately have been veering towards only using the brush opacity settings once I've got the image I'm working on in fairly good shape, with all the colours and values blocked in. I find it's easier to maintain structure that way, and with full opacity brushes you don't get stuck trying to refine each shade with these "microglazes" like I used to tend to... But if you have a tablet you can use the painting area as a palette of sorts: just paint a blob of colour on the "canvas" and then, at a lower opacity paint the colour you want to mix that with over that blob. Then you can sample the blended colour you have created with the colour picker.

Here's an example of a painting from life I did, not in photoshop but opencanvas. The technique is the exact same I use anyway, though. (yes much of it sucks.) The cloth over the chair demonstrates what I said above quite well. I hope.

http://koti.mbnet.fi/affected/2005-4-22.jpg (nudity)

I'm not exactly even sure what it is you're having trouble with, though... Maybe you don't know yourself, Photoshop can be a daunting application if you're just thrown in front of it with no explanation. The painting part is fairly intuitive after a while though, and you'll find that most of traditional theory, paint mixing aside does apply.

DyslexicDan
04-28-2005, 09:37 PM
I guess my problem is that I have never run into anyone who could explain Photoshop in this manner of use. There is a 109 different tutorials out there teaching you to do photo manipulation, making buttons for web sites, adding your self into pictures of celebrities but nothing on how paint. Correction, there are tutorials explaining how color images with Photoshop as the medium but they never explain how they got the brush to look like that or do what it does. They also donít explain how they manage their color pallets if they have one at all. Its not artistic techniques that Iím having problems with its Photoshop its self. So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?

-NG-
04-28-2005, 09:41 PM
I guess my problem is that I have never run into anyone who could explain Photoshop in this manner of use. There is a 109 different tutorials out there teaching you to do photo manipulation, making buttons for web sites, adding your self into pictures of celebrities but nothing on how paint. Correction, there are tutorials explaining how color images with Photoshop as the medium but they never explain how they got the brush to look like that or do what it does. They also donít explain how they manage their color pallets if they have one at all. Its not artistic techniques that Iím having problems with its Photoshop its self. So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?

Read e few books on traditional painting or get a few art classes and then you'll know. :)

JMcWilliams
04-29-2005, 02:39 AM
I guess my problem is that I have never run into anyone who could explain Photoshop in this manner of use. There is a 109 different tutorials out there teaching you to do photo manipulation, making buttons for web sites, adding your self into pictures of celebrities but nothing on how paint. Correction, there are tutorials explaining how color images with Photoshop as the medium but they never explain how they got the brush to look like that or do what it does. They also donít explain how they manage their color pallets if they have one at all. Its not artistic techniques that Iím having problems with its Photoshop its self. So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?

What things? I mean at the base, all you really need to do is use the airbrush tool. What someones works looks like is primarily down to how they apply the brush strokes... not something that can be explained easily. I mean, look how many diverse styles of pencil art you can find, it's the guiding hand thats important.

1st off, make sure you give yourself a nice big canvas size if you are doing a large painting. I usually start off at 2000 pixals wide or more.

I don't know about everyone else but these two brushes are the ones I use the most:

http://www.digital-animosity.com/brushes.jpg

The brush size you pick depends on what you want to do... you can press [ & ] keys to decrease & increase brush size as you paint. Make use of the zoom feature if that helps.

Now take my avatar picture for example.... the fur around the neck was done by using a small brush as above with low opacity, building up levels of highlights and texture with each stroke.
EVERYTHING can be achieved with just the simple brushes, from wood, clouds, monkey fur, alien skin, Slippery snakes... you name it, it's all about the strokes... not the brush. IMHO

Pick a colour you like and start working. If you are painting something like clouds, then you might want to use the soft brush and put the opacity right down, then keep working into the area, adding lighter areas upon the darker areas for example.

The thing to remember is that you just have to sit down, and paint. Tutorials are great for learning tools (or at least learning that they exist)... but looking for tutorials to somehow magically help you mimic an artists style is not gonna work, how you apply the tools is down to you. As I said before, forget all the fancy tools, filters and fluff.... get a blank canvas, pick a colour, pick a brush and just start scribbling away. There are no shortcuts, well... there is a shortcut to mediocrity, reliance on canned effects.

(Do you know how to use layers? If not, lookup the adobe help on them, they are useful.)

rynosseros
04-29-2005, 07:21 AM
I also "suck" at painting in Photoshop but I am improving simply by forcing myself to paint and become more familiar with the program. I also find inspiration to improve myself by seeing what others can achieve using it in these forums.

When I started painting in Photoshop, I did a search on Google to see if there was a simple tutorial to point me in the right direction. That's primarily how I stumbled across CGTalk and the book d'artiste which is an interesting read and I would highly recommend it. d'artiste or any tutorial for that matter, however, doesn't replace the need to practice. The more you practice, the better you get. You may think that you're not improving and become discouraged, but you will get better.

If you do still need a tutorial to help you out, do a search on Google. Here's one I found a couple of minutes ago http://www.admemento.com/Tutorials/PS-Basics/ (http://www.admemento.com/Tutorials/PS-Basics/). It's described as a beginers guide to digital painting in Photoshop....

Ilikesoup
04-29-2005, 05:08 PM
How to learn to digital paint in 3 easy steps:
1. Learn how to paint -- know anatomy, perspective, color & composition theory, etc.
2. Learn all the tools and features of Photoshop
3. Paint good :)

I like what Enayla and others have said about learning by trial and error, but with a program as complex as Photoshop there are features and commands that you probably won't discover on your own. I took an intro to Photoshop class for $250 about 6 years ago when PS5 was the latest version. It served me well for learning the basic tools and how they can be used for different effects. I later discovered this series of books (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/032119375X/qid=1114784822/sr=8-8/ref=pd_ka_1/102-7431895-0410564?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)Adobe puts out for about $45 each, and most of the class lessons were taken directly from the book. Every chapter is a tutorial designed to introduce a new set of tools, and Adobe provides a CD with image files so you know what you're dealing with. It's great for learning Photoshop, but probably won't have much on digital painting per se.

The other thing I'd advise is opening your own thread in the 2D WIP section. If you have specific problems with PS it's easier to get advice if we can see where you're getting stuck. Also, check out what other people are doing in their own art on CGTalk. If you see an effect that somebody has achieved in their work, ask how they did it. I've found most artists here to be very generous with their advice. Above all, have fun with it and enjoy making mistakes and bad pictures for awhile. It's all part of the learning process.

jebas
04-29-2005, 06:45 PM
I too am learning to use the digital media. Moving from colored pencil and oil to computer is a slow process, but I have learned a lot from this site; specifically the Challenges. Since they have to show all of their work from beginning to end, you can see how they build their paintings.

For example http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=221733 explained how he was using highlight, shadow, and color as separate layers so he could have a painted that looked nearly completed, but still allow him to experiment with the various color schemes. It gave me enough insight that I have changed the way that I am building pictures.

I've improved a lot by simply lurking in the Challenge threads.

pushav
04-29-2005, 08:26 PM
Be sure to study some color theory also. And use a tablet if you can.

A cheap way to learn how to paint is to color your work as if you were coloring a comibook then paint over the inked/pencil lines and blend everthing together.

The best program to make a painting would be painter in my opinion. Painter can even mimic oils nicely. Blending in Photoshop can be a serious pain when painting.

The best program to tweak you painting would be photoshop. In this program painting skies is a breeze.

In general you must fail at painting something before you are sucessful at painting.

And I can tell you that I was failing even with a tablet.:)

Also hang out on a forum at wetcanvas.com (this iste has a lot of traditional artist on there.)

JA-forreal
04-29-2005, 10:54 PM
I need help painting in adobe photoshop, i really suck at it...anybody know any good books in painting in photoshop????? you can email me at reed247@mail.com

Yeah get some books on painting in Photoshop and also check out 3d game Skinning websites. 3d game texture painters have techniques for creating art in Photoshop that are amazing.

You will learn how to do rough detail layouts to set up outlines for your painting using Photoshops vector drawing tools. Learn how to use the smudge tools to define light and color midtones. There are tricks on how to use the burn tool for defining shadows and darker detail. You can lean tricks for painting realistic metal and skin tones. You will see how effective Photoshops layers and blend channels are during your painting process. As you learn about custom brushes you will see how you can paint any type of effect that you can imagine. If you use Gimp then many of the processes will be similar to Photoshop.

Get some books on art, artistic perspective, color technique, etc. You can find links to those in this forum.

As a 3d artist I use the 2d software painting process to texture my 3d objects. Learning how to work with Photoshop and Gimp really comes in handy for 3d texturing work.

Stahlberg
05-01-2005, 03:40 AM
I don't know how badly you're doing in PS, and how good you do otherwise in traditional media... but if the difference is really huge, try this:
KISS. Keep It Simple Stupid.
Not saying you're stupid, it's just the way the mnemonic goes. :)
Simplify as much as you can.

All you really need are 2 simple brushes.
One round hard-edged, with only the opacity pressure sensitive.
One smudge brush, soft-edged, pressure sensitive intensity.

Paint with one hand on the [ ] keys, to make the brush smaller and larger as you need. That's all. Lay down colors or tones, smudge them, lay down more, etc. It works for almost everything, except heavy fine texture, and you don't need to complicate life with such stuff while you're learning the basics of digital painting.

Next step, once you have that down, is to learn to use the lasso, it can help a lot. Lasso something, paint inside it, you'll see what I mean. It's like cutting masks for airbrushing. (Except I hate the look of the airbrush in PS with a passion.)

As a final step it often turns out quite nice to add some sharpening (in the filter menu).

jmBoekestein
05-01-2005, 10:29 PM
http://img155.echo.cx/img155/5996/rtfm6re.gif (http://www.imageshack.us)


...

GOTgraphic
05-01-2005, 11:04 PM
All you really need are 2 simple brushes.
One round hard-edged, with only the opacity pressure sensitive.
One smudge brush, soft-edged, pressure sensitive intensity.


noob question:
How is one able to get the brush (with PS & Wacom) to be either "pressure" sensitive or "opacity" sensitive? I can't figure it out. My brushes are all pressure sensitive, where the more pressure equals wider brush stroke... can't figure out how to make the opacity change with pressure.

jmBoekestein
05-01-2005, 11:07 PM
Go check Enayla's painting an eye thread, she describes what she does to get the effect there. It's someewhere on page 12 or something. lemmecheck.

how to on brushes. (http://www.cgtalk.com/showpost.php?p=2133518&postcount=74)

GOTgraphic
05-01-2005, 11:31 PM
Cool, thanks JmBoekestein!

jfrancis
05-11-2005, 04:38 AM
http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/images/hardBrushSettings.jpg
http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/images/hardBrushTechnique.jpg

http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/2005/04/painting_with_p.html

Stahlberg
05-11-2005, 06:51 AM
Yes exactly, jfrancis. Is that part of a tutorial? I'd like to link it in the Art Theory thread.

dbclemons
05-11-2005, 04:06 PM
...So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?

You're not going to get there without practicing. All of the artists that use this tool well just spend the time working with it regularly and using their experiences with variable settings to get the effect they're after as well as listening (or reading) the experience of others. There's no shortcuts to putting in the time. You can go quite far by using the tools at their most basic level, and that's where your natural ability steps in, but at some point you'll want to try other settings to extend the ability of the tool your using. Play around with how changes to the jitter and spacing values change the look, things like that.

Another valuable point to make is what you base your inspiration and knowledge on. If you have a solid understanding of the way things look in nature, you can better achieve that look in your art, digital or not digital. If you're after a good lighting effect you have to know how light works to recreate it in your art. If you don't, that weakness is going to show. The next step is to get the tools to do what you want them to.

-David

jfrancis
05-24-2005, 04:56 PM
Yes exactly, jfrancis. Is that part of a tutorial? I'd like to link it in the Art Theory thread.

I don't have much more than what's at this link (http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/2005/04/painting_with_p.html)

"The two most important brushes in Photoshop are the hard-edged circle and the soft-edged circle. The most important tool is a tablet with a pen.

Set your brush's opacity to respond to pen pressure.

Most things in the world have hard edges. You'll use your hard-edged brush a lot.

Many color transitions on or within objects are soft. You may find your soft-edged brush comes in handy in those cases -- but not as handy as you think -- don't over rely on it.

You can get a huge amount (maybe even most) of your work done with with a pressure-sensitive hard-edged circle.

How do you blend one color into another with a hard-edged brush?

Use a light touch (low pressure) and paint this color into that, and that color back into this.

Your two best hot keys are the size changers, ] for bigger size and [ for smaller size, and the eye dropper key (alt on Windows)

Don't eye-dropper colors from photos. Try to estimate them by eye. Feel free to sample your own colors from elsewhere in your own painting."
-----
Addt'l notes:

Personally, I prefer not to let pressure control brush size; only opacity.

If you are using pressure sensitivity, DO take the time to go into the Wacom software and adjust the pressure sensitivity of the tip. There is a slider that remaps pressure values through a curve. I like to set my pen tip to be one notch to the right of (firmer than) the default setting. I find this brings out the subtlety of the light touch, and helps prevent the tip from slamming from barely on to fully on without a smooth transition.

-----
...as I read back I see it's very similar to what you said (which I probably read on your site sometime in the past) except that I don't use a smudge brush for blending; I paint back into the blend area with the original colors and a light pressure touch, or with intermediate colors sampled from the developing blend area.

Stahlberg
05-24-2005, 06:05 PM
Thanks, consicely stated, maybe I'll just link this thread into the sticky one, calling it Photoshop-painting FAQ or something. :)

umbrellasky
05-25-2005, 07:09 PM
I myself have only been using photoshop for a few months. I tend to jump from painter to photoshop throughout the process of my paintings, I find somethings I can do in painter that I can't in photoshop and vise versa.

The way I started was from searching tutorials on google and looking for tutorials on other artists websites. It's all about playing around with the different tools and not being afraid of making mistakes. I have also learnt so much in the past couple of weeks since I have become a member here at cgtalk. I'm constantly picking up tips and tricks whilst I'm browsing the forumns :)

heythatreallyhurts
05-26-2005, 06:36 AM
I've had the same problems many people in this thread have talked about. I've been fairly decent at drawing for most of my life, but I just got my Wacom a few months ago (after taking a class with an instructor who recommended it), and my progression has been incredibly slow.

My biggest problems ó being intimidated by all the different features of the programs I'm trying to learn (Painter IX and Photoshop CS, though I'm vaguely familiar with Photoshop for most other purposes, just not painting), becoming frustrated when I can't figure out how to get an effect I've seen someone else create, and giving up too easily on a drawing or painting I'm trying to do that isn't turning out well. I also have a major weakness when it comes to colors: even in traditional media, color was always my weakest area, though I have a decent grasp of things like anatomy and perspective.

I searched for some books too, but the one I ended up getting (Painter IX Creativity by Jeremy Sutton) hasn't been very helpful. I was able to figure most of that stuff out by trial and error, and I still really suck at using the program.

This thread has been a great help, though, and I'm eager to start trying out some of the things that have been suggested. I'll definitely look into getting one of the D'Artiste books; is there one in particular that would be suited to a beginner in digital painting who has a strong traditional-media background?

endseason
05-26-2005, 10:11 PM
hello all and thanks everyone for this very interesting thread...
i am not a newbie but today reading all this thread i got some very useful trick to improve...

it could be sound silly but this thread with links like digitalartform one, really made my day:)

Fahrija
05-27-2005, 01:48 PM
naaaahhh PS drives me nuts too, much prefer Painter for drawing or painting to be honest

The same here > I almost use Photoshop for adding details and working on texturing of the images Iīve done in Painter. Without rotating the paper I stuck in Photoshop. Maybe a Wacom Cintiq would solve the problem.:)

jfrancis
06-10-2005, 10:11 PM
http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/images/gradColorMix.jpg

If you do use opacity falloff to blend colors, you are not really "mixing" colors -- you are just blending them in the form of a linear gradation from one to the other.

If you see (or expect or want) colors you are not getting, you can "help the blend" along by sticking a third color into the process.

http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/images/psColorMixing_1.jpg

Painter models color mixing better than Photoshop does, but you can get somewhat accurate color mixing from Photoshop if you use "multiply" as your brush or layer blend mode.

Here's a whole lot more on Digital Color Mixing in Photoshop (http://www.digitalartform.com/archives/2005/06/digital_color_m.html)

Mario The ][
06-11-2005, 07:27 PM
That last thing is really great, one of the things i struggle most with in PS is the mixing of colors.
But i guess it comes down to pratice, like with every other tool (pencil etc) you would use.

Be sure to check out DeepPaint, even if it hasnt the functions you get with PS it allows you to paint and mix colors and has nice brushes.

It atleast allowed me to jump directly in and start painting, a bit more like with a brush.

cthorp
07-06-2005, 07:01 AM
Thought I would add my 2 cents worth. First, the term "good" at drawing and painting is pretty relative. My guess is that most of us mean we can replecate nature with a particular medium, whether traditional or digital. Beyond what makes a great image, (concept, composition, etc.) the secret I believe is a thourough understanding of light, and structure, value and edges). Ad into that the expressive manipulation of the chosen medium and you will have great art. Of course it is one thing to verbalize it, quite another to do it.

Let me say I am a professional artist that works in Photoshop. But even though some would say I am "good", all one has to do is go to www.goodbrush.com to see someone who is great.

It is really hard to give advice without knowing where you are in skill level. On the one hand you don't want to talk down to someone who has a command of a particular medium but is struggling with PS. But you also don't want to assume PS is the issue.

The nice thing about PS is that if you do have a command of painting you will begin to rapidly improve in PS due to the ability to undo, layer, and experiment.

My advice is to look at as much good work as you can and start to analyze what the artist is doing. The internet is great for this. Then draw, paint and study as much as you can.

I have so far to go myself!

cthorp

You can see some of my work at www.theispot.com/artist/cthorp

or go to www.thebrooklynbrothers.com to see the billboard I just did for the History channel (in PS of course). The file was huge! It's in their portfolio under "print" and is of a cowboy being chased by some indians.

fourcrowsArt
07-09-2005, 01:25 AM
Hi everyone, this is my first post...please forgive me for not having read everything here on gc...I only found it a few days ago when doing a search on computer graphics. Right now I'm completely lost on the board, but hopefully will be much better the next time I post...

I just have one question. I've been an artist for about 15 years, and have no issues with art itself...now I'd like to try my hand at computer imaging...(I had this odd misconception that if I could one, it would be an easy process moving to the other...ugh)

so...(as I blather on, sorry) If I have images I've painted or sketched, do I scan them and use them, or am I drawing completely from scratch? I can see I'll probably need a pad of some kind (I'm hoping I can find info on that here too) but for now, for playing...(I have photoshop cs, and illustrator, and am thinking of getting painter) can someone please point me in the right general direction...(scan or new)...and maybe tell me the best thread to immerse myself into for the next week or so?

Thanks so much, I can't believe the wealth of information here...it's amazing how helpful everyone seems to be....

Robin

Meagan
07-11-2005, 08:03 AM
Anyone know of online digital painting workshops for 2D?

jfrancis
07-14-2005, 08:31 AM
I think there's online classes for Painter here:

http://tutoralley.com/

ZorroXZorro
07-15-2005, 12:00 PM
Sorry , but i have a small question : Did all picture in garelly painted by CG ? And Did you paint it by mouse ?

Thanks !

Blikkie
07-15-2005, 07:27 PM
Sorry , but i have a small question : Did all picture in garelly painted by CG ? And Did you paint it by mouse?

*Edit* the tone of the post has been softened and answers expanded */edit*

You could have read it elsewhere, but I repeat here for your convenience:

Al the pictures are CGI (part of the rules)
Most people use tablets (Wacom an all) but some use mice

Usually people tell what program and renderer, if that applies, they have used to create a picture. It isn't all that uncommon to start a 2D project with a 2D scanned image, since for many people it is so much more natural to sketch stuff down on paper, but some of the big names say they don't use paper anymore and have digitalized their whole pipeline.

ashakarc
07-15-2005, 07:44 PM
Blikkie: Considering ZorroXZorro's question and taking into account that this is his first post on CGTalk, we here at this community are expected to be welcoming not rude like that. What a petty !

Blikkie
07-15-2005, 08:05 PM
I am terribly sorry, shouldn't have followed my impulses. This forum deserves better manners.

Terro
07-15-2005, 08:15 PM
EDIT: I goofed , not sure how my post eneded up here.

new2LW
07-16-2005, 10:13 PM
There are quite a few videos on painting, under skinning and painting sections here:

http://www.planetquake.com/polycount/resources/general/video_tutorials/video-tut-list.shtml

[edit] I think most of them are time lapse, no audio.

heythatreallyhurts
07-18-2005, 08:09 AM
Thought I would add my 2 cents worth. First, the term "good" at drawing and painting is pretty relative. My guess is that most of us mean we can replecate nature with a particular medium, whether traditional or digital. Beyond what makes a great image, (concept, composition, etc.) the secret I believe is a thourough understanding of light, and structure, value and edges). Ad into that the expressive manipulation of the chosen medium and you will have great art. Of course it is one thing to verbalize it, quite another to do it.

I'm not sure if you were talking to me specifically or were prompted by my saying I'm already "good" at drawing the old-fashioned way, but what I actually meant was a bit more than that. I've been focusing on art since childhood, all the way through school and into college, but with traditional media. The problem is that I'm getting frustrated with the programs themselves, because they all have so many different menus and tools and I find myself being reduced to going through each one, looking for the one I want (since I have absolutely no idea what most of the terms mean). The actual drawing and painting parts I'm pretty okay with (at least at a level where I'm satisfied with my progress), but I'm having the hardest time with all the idiosyncrasies of the digital medium. I usually end up trying to paint in PS or Painter as I would on an actual canvas ó not using any of the major features of the programs ó just because I can't get comfortable with all the different stuff each program has.

Great paintings, by the way! That's much like the style I'd like to achieve. I think Craig Mullins' work is interesting, and he's definitely amazing at what he does, but that's not what I'm shooting for. I just want to be as competent digitally as I am in real life, enough to work professionally.

Seratogui
07-18-2005, 08:10 PM
I think there's online classes for Painter here:

http://tutoralley.com/

you can't register, seems pretty elitist that site.

theCloudmover
07-18-2005, 08:57 PM
If you're interested in Painting with Photoshop pick up -

Illustrations with Photoshop : A Designer's Notebook (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0596008597/qid=1121716135/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-4877652-0988137?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)

I think, the choice of artists in the book cover a wide range of styles and possible techniques. It also has a tutorial by Sparth! One of these artists might emulate your workflow and help you discover some new possibilities.

Photoshop is such a powerful program that RTFM and learning the basics of drawing and painting isn't enough. I think one needs to see how others use it's vast array of features to comprehend what can be done with it.

The Gnomon DVDs and as been mentioned, the Don Seegmiller book Digital Character Design and Painting: The Photoshop CS Edition (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1584503408/qid=1121716296/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-4877652-0988137?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) might also be helpful. Without the Seegmiller book I would NEVER have thought to use the healing brush as a blender.

Hope that helps.

jfrancis
07-19-2005, 08:50 AM
you can't register, seems pretty elitist that site.

I thought it was open these days.

XistinaX
07-19-2005, 05:47 PM
First post-- and I have to say, great thread!

As someone who usually just 'airbrushes' her lineart of misc. vehicles, this thread has given me the 'guts' to finally try some hardcore artwork in PS. Move out of my comfort zone, you could say. I want to create art now.... not just illustrate (if that makes any sense)

Photoshop is a deep, deep program. Along with automotive illustration, I use it for layout of print work (I'm also a graphic designer), I can do spot channel separations for t-shirts (all the way to saving each channel as a halftoned, bitmap .tif, ready for film), or a silly filtered-to-the-max 'chop of a friend's car.

Practice, practice, practice... :)

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