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akewt
03-13-2005, 12:50 PM
mt client wants me to render out frames from AE that is '16:9 anamorphic - 4:3 safe' any ideas wqhat resolution this is?? i'm new to this game :)

gudi3d
03-13-2005, 01:06 PM
I don't know if this is what you are asking, but I believe that your client wants you to render a 16:9 animation that already comes with the black areas over and below it, completing the area of a 4:3 aspect image. But I am not completely sure about it.

Shinjipierre
03-13-2005, 03:01 PM
You have to add the letterbox, that's all. The video will have black borders.

RobinOberg
03-13-2005, 03:49 PM
letterbox isn't "16:9 safe".

there's an aspect ratio setting in xvid that you could use, but it doesn't work on many players.
i'd recommend encoding it to stretched 4:3 (anamorphic) and force it down to 16:9 with a matroska container. check www.matroska.com for more info on that.

Paulumbo
03-14-2005, 02:28 PM
4:3 Safe reffers to a portion of the screen which will not be clipped when viewed on a 4:3 television. The standard varies depending on broadcaster, and if the work is going out on a range of different channels you really should take each one into consideration. If you're working with "clients" you should know this!

akewt
03-14-2005, 03:17 PM
thx for your replies.

i am presuming he means rendering out 16:9 making sure it can be cropped to an aspect ratio of 4:3. i know i should know this Paulumbo thats why im asking!! its the first time i've had to use AE to produce broadcast shots.

im rendering 1024x1152 for 16:9 anamorphic. is this correct?

Paulumbo
03-14-2005, 03:42 PM
Depends on the format, 16:9 PAL can be 720 x 576 with a pixel aspect ratio of 1.42, I don't know the HD formats, or NTSC (UK is 16:9 PAL). All the most common settings are in the composition settings. The size you are using is unfamiliar to me.

akewt
03-14-2005, 04:01 PM
anamorphic is 2:1 pixel aspect ratio right? cos when i use the pal widescreen its 16:9 but when i change it to anamorphic the ratio goes to 5:2 :sad:

so i basically guessed it and made a custom setup. im now thinking that my client maybe confused. i aint gonna say that though!

can anyone else tell me the right res for 16:9 pal anamorphic? and yes i've put it through google.

Paulumbo
03-14-2005, 04:10 PM
You can't use a custom setup.
Go to file menu > Composition Settings, and set
Preset drop down to "PAL D1/DV Widescreen, 720x576"
Width should already be "720"
Height should already be "576"
Pixel Aspect Ratio drop down to "D1/DV PAL 1.42"
Frame Rate to "25"

akewt
03-14-2005, 04:13 PM
thanks for your help Paulumbo. im banging my head against the wall with this. my client said he wanted 16:9 anamorphic but i cant get it with the presets! is there such a thing?

i think i'm gonna go with that setting you have. i did ask him whjat res it was but he dosent know. hes a director and not too technical :)

jussing
03-19-2005, 02:35 AM
If he wants "4:3 safe", I actually think this is the right answer:
I don't know if this is what you are asking, but I believe that your client wants you to render a 16:9 animation that already comes with the black areas over and below it, completing the area of a 4:3 aspect image. But I am not completely sure about it.

But akewt, 16:9 anamorphic is "PAL D1/DV Widescreen, 720x576" like Paulumbo said.

...But that is NOT 4:3 safe.

- Jonas

akewt
03-19-2005, 02:43 AM
ok, thanks jussing. i will use PAL D1/DV Widescreen, 720x576.

does anamorphic mean that the pixels are 2:1 ratio?

jussing
03-19-2005, 02:49 AM
ok, thanks jussing. i will use PAL D1/DV Widescreen, 720x576.

does anamorphic mean that the pixels are 2:1 ratio?

No, anamorphic just means the picture is stretched, and the pixels aren't 1:1. (the term "anamorphic" also covers a Cinemascope anamorphic lens, from before the days of pixels)

In the case of PAL anamorphic 16:9, pixel aspect ratio is 1,41:1, like Palumbo said. :)

Cheers,
- Jonas

akewt
03-19-2005, 02:55 AM
the mist has cleared. i understand perfectly now. i thought anamorphic had to be 2:1 aspect.

cheers mate :thumbsup:

jussing
03-19-2005, 02:57 AM
...there's still something hokey about this, though. '16:9 anamorphic - 4:3 safe' doesn't make sense, IMO. -Because if it's anamorphic, it's not 4:3 safe - it'll look "stretched" vertically on a 4:3 monitor. If he wants a picture that can be shown on both screens, he'd want a 16:9 picture letterboxed in a 4:3 frame - and that's NOT anamorphic.

Nevertheless, rendering in 16:9 is a good option, cause then you can easily re-import and re-render it in a 4:3 frame, if the client finds out that's what he wants.

But what is the source data - the clips you use in your composition? Is there any CG or live-action?

Cheers,
- Jonas

akewt
03-19-2005, 03:06 AM
the frames are CG. maybe he means that if he needs to he can crop it to 4:3. so the focus of the sequence is within a 4:3 area.

it confused the hell out of me when he asked for it. oh well. i thoguth if i rendered out high resolution then he can stretch it how he wants.

Paulumbo
03-21-2005, 08:39 AM
16:9 action/text safe areas are just one thing to keep in mind when creating motion graphics for television.

16:9 4:3 Safe is a portion of the 16:9 image that will remain visible when displayed on a 16:9 (Widscreen) Television, and a 4:3 (Square) Television. Basically you are creating a rectangular image for 16:9 but when displayed on a 4:3 (Square) TV the left and right of the rectangular image will be clipped by the 4:3 (Square) TV.


The standard varies depending on which television channel is putting out your work. I have explained this once already, but maybe not clear enough check page 18 out of this document from the BBC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/delivering_quality/pdf/tv/tv_standards_london.pdf

jussing
03-21-2005, 08:48 AM
Well than Akewt is doing all right, cause that's what he said in his last post.

- Jonas

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