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MadSkillzMan
02-24-2005, 11:18 PM
hey guys, i got a mixer and a ton of audio junk from my band. Problem is, we only use dynamic mics for recording. THeyve worked great all this time, i use cakewalk and a pair of reel to reel decks.

ANyways we were going to take my boom stands a part to make carryable booms for the movie. alright no problem there. Only i jsut tried using the dynamic about a foot above the actor, and it doesnt come out much better than with the camera mic, so im thinking about just scraping the audio idea for this project (wer crammed for time, otherwise id get a condensor mic)

so are there any programs out there that can scrub out the backround noise and such? its not THAT much backround, its just your can hear theres that distance between the mic and the actor, know what i mean?

Thanks in advance guys.

olioli
02-25-2005, 01:47 AM
try using digidesign's ProTools. they had a plug in called dither that's pretty good at taking out background junk.

Hope that helps.

michaeljr
02-25-2005, 04:58 AM
Without getting to technical, cause I don't want to look on the web right now, I believe those mics you used to record vocals and instruments are omni directional. unless you are right on it, or singing into at certain volume level, it's not going to pick up much, plus it may grab sound from all around it's head.

the mics on an average camera are directional and say on my Sony PDX10 is a small XLR boom mic which pics up sound a good 10-12 feet out. if I need more controlled audio pickup I have a nice 18inch boom mic that goes good for about 20 feet. cost about 200-300$ and has a battery for using on cameras wtihout phantom power.

also I believe the boom mic samples sound around it, compares that with the sound it gets out in front of it, and then removes some of the none directional sound. these boom mics up close though, REALLY pic up audio. you can be a few feet out of frame and basically only hear what the actor is saying. this is why they use them in the movies :)

if you are stucking using direction mics, do it like the old days before boom mics and good audio recording. hide them. hide them around the actors, in a plant, under a book, etc. etc. then also record with the camera so you can mix the two audio recordings together. the camera will get you a nice overall sound, but the closer mics will hold (hopefully) more quality and not get your echos if you are in doors.

mJR
www.mjrworld.com (http://www.mjrworld.com/)

MadSkillzMan
02-25-2005, 05:16 AM
hmm...so i might just be better off using the camera mic?

I talked to a friend of mine whos in recording school. He suggested running it thru a hi-pass filter and setting the dB to the right amount, which is what i just might end up doing.

Hiding them is no biggy, its all green screen work so masking will do, that is if i use them.

thanks for the headsup

Fungusmonkey
02-25-2005, 09:05 PM
Coming from a professional music and recording background, here are my recommendations.

1. Buy a shotgun mic. They are what is actually used for booms.
2. If you're low on cash, buy a cheap or used Shure SM58 or SM59 with a decent wind screen. Any album you've ever heard recorded was made with at least a few of these. I've used these on personal projects, but you will hear a little background bleed, especially when shooting outside. You can eliminate a lot of this by isolating the vocal frequencies when you EQ the tracks later.
3. Lapel mics (lavaliers). They are an absolute must for dialog. Hook them inconspicously onto your actors and you can get crisp clean sound with little or no background mic. They can be bought in different colors, or even painted or covered slightly with cloth to blend in with fabrics. No to mention you can also attach them to wireless transmitters so that the actor doesn't have to have wires running down his/her back.

You should check out audio sites like www.equipmentemporium.com (http://www.equipmentemporium.com/) and such. They can give you a lot of info about the different types of mic and uses, etc.

As far as movies go, good audio is a must. And like the old saying "What you put in is what you get out", in order to get good audio, you may need to spend time and money on it. Hope this helps.

michaeljr
02-25-2005, 09:30 PM
http://search.ebay.com/shotgun-microphone_W0QQfkrZ1QQfromZR8

here are a ton of shotgun mics on ebay, some are cheap enough just to give it a whirl.

Sound can make or break your film. be aware. when I watch CG animations and such that are REALLY GOOD, but have audio recorded with those cheap web cam mics, it just turns my stomach and really kills the animation. or short films that have a good story and nice images, but sounds like it came out of a garbage can.

what's the THX Logo, the Audience is Listening.

do the best you can and rather removing sound during filming, try to record as much audio as you can live, you can always filter it digitally later. if you take to much out wtih filters and things before hand, you can never go and get it back

Somhairle
02-27-2005, 08:06 PM
so are there any programs out there that can scrub out the backround noise and such? its not THAT much backround, its just your can hear theres that distance between the mic and the actor, know what i mean?

Thanks in advance guys.

Hey MadSkillzMan,

I had a similar problem where I worked after recording an actors interview on location (the Mic got slightly damaged somehow :D)...anyway:

Adobe Audition (http://www.adobe.com/products/audition/main.html) is just one of the best for a home PC. (its got the spectral view that really helps to visualize the audio and remove the noise level you don't want, EQ's etc).

hope that helps!

- Somhairle

MadSkillzMan
02-28-2005, 02:36 AM
thanks!

i will def look into that! atm i dont need it for the outdoor scene, we have a freeway near our house and it adds all kindsa horrible backroudn noise...but the camera shows this falling satellite (lol dont ask)and well i needed some noise to fill there..so that worked.. ihavent gotten to the parts i shot inside..thatll be a few days from now

Somhairle
03-22-2005, 02:39 AM
Well? How did it go?

MadSkillzMan
03-24-2005, 07:33 PM
sorry about not replying....having serious issues...vieo card is dead and such..

it went pretty well. The outside scene just cant be fixed though, using filters it gives it the washy MP3 sound, so ill just have to get a shotgun mic for outdoor.

indoor however worked very well. it cleaned up the "distance" between the actor and the mic a great deal, and yes i used adobe audition.

Somhairle
03-27-2005, 08:14 PM
Sorry to hear it didn't work too well!

Here's some weblinks that might help in future:

http://www.hammersound.net/noicereduction/removing_unwanted_noises.html
http://www.wrigleyvideo.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=5815&st=0&%20

I used aduition a lot also for removing the environment reverb like you did (when there's too much distance from the mic), I was happy with the results!

I hope the links help some, especially the last!

- Somhairle

michaeljr
03-28-2005, 01:03 AM
well I have never been on a "real" movie shoot, but I know that depending on where and how outdoor scenes are shot, all the footage usually has to be ADR and looped afterwords.

so to fix your outdoor scene, why don't you loop the audio?

get all the actors together, find a walk in closet full of cloths (makes a great sound proof / none reverberating environment), setup your mic (with a pop filter) and a stand for their lines, get a video for playback and re-record their audio as they watch themselves act.

then overlay that over the original, or better yet, recreate the outdoor scene audio all together, you will end up with a much more polished audio like that of a mainstream movie.

fwtep
03-28-2005, 02:21 AM
well I have never been on a "real" movie shoot, but I know that depending on where and how outdoor scenes are shot, all the footage usually has to be ADR and looped afterwords.Whether you do ADR or not is also dependent on what other sounds were recorded with the audio. When you submit your masters to a distributor you have to have three complete audio tracks: 1) Dialog only, 2) Music & Effects (also called an "M&E"), and 3) a composite (complete mix of everything).

The reason you need a dialog track separate from the M&E is so they can do foreign language dubs. The dialog track can't have ANY sound effects in it-- no footsteps, no creaking of a chair, no wind, no sounds from clothing, etc. The reason is that in foreign dubs that track won't get used, so none of those effects will be heard.

So a lot of ADR is done merely to get a clean track without any other sound. For example, in my film, during one scene people were preparing their backpacks for a hike. Unavoidably, some of the original sound had extraneous sounds from what they were doing, and I had to remove it all or ADR it.

so to fix your outdoor scene, why don't you loop the audio?That's a good idea.

get all the actors together, find a walk in closet full of cloths (makes a great sound proof / none reverberating environment), setup your mic (with a pop filter) and a stand for their lines, get a video for playback and re-record their audio as they watch themselves act. One thing that might be better is to find a secluded place outdoors where there are no sounds (dogs barking, cars, etc.) and record the sound there. Don't put the mic too close though because it'll sound like they're talking into a mic. If you're only ADR'ing some lines, try to use the same mic that was used in the original shoot and have it positioned the same as it originally was.

Fred

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