PDA

View Full Version : Finding Nemo... who's story is it? lawsuit pending


WillieT
02-16-2005, 06:43 PM
http://1010wins.com/topstories/local_story_047112447.html (http://1010wins.com/topstories/local_story_047112447.html%20)

Sorry in advance if this has already been listed.

Apparently Disney took the idea for Finding Nemo from a submitted manuscript back in 1996 and never credited or compensated the poor guy who had the idea.

These law suites are a dime a dozen, but his one has so many interesting factors I thought it was worth posting. Of course through story dev. parts of the story are different, but allot is similar.. Wish we could get ahold of this guys concept.

Give a read.. do you think any group of lawyers can break Disney's POWER lawyers on original concepts?

pearson
02-16-2005, 07:02 PM
Well, this is new to me. Before it was a French guy claiming they had stolen his idea.

While I don't know anything about this claim, I thought it was funny that they claim the story had "creatures with large eyes and other exaggerated features" and think that is proof that the story is stolen. If that's true, I've seen several works on this site that are clearly "stolen" from his work! :p

PS. the link has an extra "http://" so it doesn't work

jeffthomann
02-16-2005, 07:07 PM
http://1010wins.com/topstories/local_story_047112447.html

It sounds like Pixar read this manuscript, saw the French guy's stuff and decided to make their own spin on all of it, combining as we go merrily along the way...

Para
02-16-2005, 07:11 PM
To caricature (or something, my dictionary failed me at this very crucial moment), Wachowski brothers and Warner Bros. clearly stole my life story since I sit in front of my computer everyday just surfing around the web and all that stuff, clearly story of Neo is my story!

Without actually reading his story it's impossible to see if he's talking the truth or not and even then it can be just a weird coinsidence.

FloydBishop
02-16-2005, 07:11 PM
"Before Sternberg submitted his manuscript, Disney had him sign a two-page waiver that said he would be entitled to only $500 if he were to claim that the company used his material without permission or authorization. The lawsuit asks the court to void that waiver."

Idiot.

pearson
02-16-2005, 07:43 PM
"Before Sternberg submitted his manuscript, Disney had him sign a two-page waiver that said he would be entitled to only $500 if he were to claim that the company used his material without permission or authorization. The lawsuit asks the court to void that waiver."

Idiot.

You've never applied to ILM? They make you sign away anything you send them so they can use it without any compensation to you...:shrug: The same waiver holds for any of the lucas companies I believe.

I understand that companies have to protect themselves, but it just seems ripe for abuse.

hypercube
02-16-2005, 07:49 PM
Regardless, he did have the waiver..just because he was stupid doesn't mean he can call a 'do-over'. I still doubt the case has grounds in the first place, as mentioned..seems a bit too convenient.

Why do these people come out of the woodwork AFTER a movie is successful? Why not when the trailers come out, or when there's news about it prior to release? They may not have their finger on the pulse of the entertainment industry, but it's hard to be 'taken by surprise' by something a couple years after it's already been out and made piles of money.

Never hear of people suing about movies that stole their idea and tanked at the box office.

jeffthomann
02-16-2005, 07:54 PM
lawyers tread where there's actual cash... If the cash is still in the public's pockets it's locked away too tightly. However, if it's already been handed over and is now sitting in a bank account earning ROI in savings it's there for the taking...

nuff said.

WillieT
02-16-2005, 07:57 PM
did you hear about the guy who saw his face on the folgers crystals coffee can? it's true! They had been using his face for over a decade! He never saw it! finally one day he was in a CVS pharmacy and saw it.. they never paid him.. lawsuit got him around 10 million. hehe

pearson
02-16-2005, 08:01 PM
Never hear of people suing about movies that stole their idea and tanked at the box office.
lol! "They stole Gigli from me!!!1!" :p

CelticArtist
02-16-2005, 09:42 PM
lol! "They stole Gigli from me!!!1!" :p

careful, they might make you pay for it ;)

FloydBishop
02-16-2005, 10:49 PM
You've never applied to ILM? They make you sign away anything you send them so they can use it without any compensation to you...:shrug: The same waiver holds for any of the lucas companies I believe.

I understand that companies have to protect themselves, but it just seems ripe for abuse.

That's my point. AIt's a standard contractul agreement. The guy signed it. They have his signature. I don't see how he has a leg to stand on at this point.

So it only counts if it works in his favor?

mopelie
02-16-2005, 10:59 PM
Is an interesting story but in all honesty, even though I like Disney and Pixar alot, I dont put it past them to take someones idea and manipulate it for their own good. Sadly and unfortunately that is how it works in some cases. I work on 3D stuff in a lawfirm and have seen how slow it can take to get info(discovery) and all that stuff and get the ball rolling. It taking 2 years for this to start, to me, isnt surprising for it being such a big case.

My friend was just served a summon to appear in court after an fender/bender accident he had a year and half ago. We both were like, wth took so long.

Will be interesting to see how this plays out and if it hurts Disney's and even Pixar's reputation.

pearson
02-16-2005, 11:21 PM
So it only counts if it works in his favor?

I was only responding to your "Idiot" comment. I'm skeptical about this guy's claim, and I don't think he should get out of a signed contract. I just think that it's a shame that to even be considered by some companies you have to give them the right to rip off your intellectual property.

kuui
02-16-2005, 11:57 PM
even if they took his story... i mean...99% of any given story you listen to, watch or read, is a partial copy of an older story or patchwork from different story.

it's like the makers of the terminator movies would have to pay money to anyone who did ever write a story about robots and something that comes from the future back to us and to anyone who ever used time paradoxons in his or her story. so, "back to the future" maybe is a spinoff of terminator?

ok, that exaggarated example doesnt fit it 100%, but i think you get what i mean

soulburn3d
02-17-2005, 12:46 AM
Never hear of people suing about movies that stole their idea and tanked at the box office.

You'd think, but something similar to this happened to a company I used to work for. There was a different company, the ones who supposedly stole their idea from some guy, and they went out of business. We did some contract work for that company, so the lawyers came after us since they couldn't sue the original company that was no longer alive.

- Neil

CaptainJackSparrow
02-17-2005, 01:56 AM
You can't copyright an idea, just the expression, to prove that someone copied the expression you'll need sufficient substanial similarity and a causal connection. Obviously here, the similarity will need to be quite substanial and in key scenes, and it would need to be proved that Disney had a causal connection to the guy in copying the material, perhaps this could be evidenced through the contacts he had with this Disney.

So yeah, he might have case.

Neil
02-17-2005, 05:23 AM
Brings back flashbacks of how apartment leases make you sign away your life and when you move out they charge you $200 to paint walls that aren't dirty and go "you signed it!".
Don't know what brought that up :)

CGTalk Moderation
02-17-2006, 07:00 AM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.