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Solothores
02-11-2005, 09:37 AM
Hot on the heels of Atari announcing the closing of its Santa Monica, CA, and Beverly, MA, offices (http://ps2.gamespy.com/playstation-2/atari-anthology/586642p1.html), Eidos quietly announced yesterday that it has closed its Ion Storm Austin office and will ramp up its Crystal Dynamics studio in San Francisco.

Ion Storm Austin, known for the Deus Ex (http://pc.gamespy.com/pc/deus-ex-invisible-war/586825p1.html#) franchise and the recent Thief: Deadly Shadows, had been hit by numerous staff departures in the past year, starting with Harvey Smith in February 2004, and Warren Spector later in 2004. According to several sources, numerous other employees have left and joined Midway's office in Austin. The latest news means the loss of 35 jobs at the Austin office. A source inside Eidos said that some of these people may get offers to work elsewhere in Eidos or at Crystal Dynamics, but nothing has been officially released.

In a prepared statement, Eidos said "This is part of the company's move to consolidate and strengthen its technical and management capabilities into a smaller number of studios which are capable of scaling up in order to meet the competitive challenges that lie ahead, particularly in anticipation of next generation technologies and platforms."

In a related move, Eidos said it will be increasing the development capabilities at its Crystal Dynamics studio in San Francisco. More than 50 people are expected to be hired as it move from a two to a three-team studio. Once all positions are hired, Crystal Dynamics would employ more than 180 people.

Stay tuned to GameSpy as we stay on top of this story.

Source: http://pc.gamespy.com/pc/deus-ex-invisible-war/586825p1.html

Fanbase Feedback: http://forums.ionstorm.com/index.php?showtopic=213485

PhilWesson
02-11-2005, 01:36 PM
whats with great games coming out, and then their respective companies going down? first troika, then this?

Bpanting
02-11-2005, 01:42 PM
If I had to guess its the publishers that are killing these companies. Making them ship incomplete buggy products.

Its to bad about Ion Storm they at one time were a great company.

glynnsmith
02-11-2005, 01:44 PM
At least, with this, Warren Spector might be able to make a decent, non-console sequel to Deus Ex.

Still a great shame though. :\

DCHAD
02-11-2005, 02:14 PM
This makes a good argument for the digital distribution method. Some may criticize Valve for Steam but whatever gets the publishers out of the equation is good!

andrewley
02-11-2005, 02:22 PM
This makes a good argument for the digital distribution method. Some may criticize Valve for Steam but whatever gets the publishers out of the equation is good!

I agree - I think this is the key to successful game development in the future, ensuring that the people who make the games enjoy the fruits of their labor.

iocomposer
02-11-2005, 06:57 PM
This makes a good argument for the digital distribution method. Some may criticize Valve for Steam but whatever gets the publishers out of the equation is good!

And that would make game development essentially a self-funded endeavor. So, in your model, not only do you have to be brilliant enough to make a game that will attract more attention than the latest wall-mart endcaps, but you'll have to be independantly wealthy as well to fund development. Sorta narrows the playing field a bit. Oh, and who's gonna fund a multi-milliion $$ P&A campaign without a physical product?

Compelling arguments! :rolleyes:

halo
02-11-2005, 07:08 PM
valve have hardly ever run a severe ad campaign...;)

fwiw, its the games that are right stiffs from the start that have money thrown at them in an attempt to gain some sort of momentum. The highest paid PR campaigns that have gone through my studio are for the right dead ducks of a game that should have been taken out the back and shot at birth.

there is something to be said for distro and publishing...but there needs to be a balance...valves attack on it is probably a swing back in the right direction, but lets not forget the owners were cash rich when they set it up.

richcz3
02-11-2005, 08:38 PM
Without Publishers, developers have no project funding and no resources to build the marketing channels. It would be interesting if the whole shareware program stepped up to the plate again. I wonder if a Steam type deliver system could facilitate the shareware method.

halo
02-12-2005, 10:14 AM
it could be a licensable solution for distribution and possibly DRM style control over demos and expiring licenses, however with todays development cost its going to be a rare thing for a game to be unsupported by a publisher.

RayenD
02-12-2005, 03:00 PM
This makes a good argument for the digital distribution method. Some may criticize Valve for Steam but whatever gets the publishers out of the equation is good!
Agree wholeheartly.

It's time to break the monopoly of big mass game factories like EA and others similar...

Internet and electronic distribution channels are big chance for independent developers. I hope it will work for Valve, then other will follow.

t-man152
02-12-2005, 03:46 PM
valve have hardly ever run a severe ad campaign...;)

Half Life 1 and counterstrike did pretty much the job of that. all counterstrike players heard of steam when the Beta for counterstrike 1.6 came out on steam.

later every article talking about Half Life 2 (which alot were) talked about steam.


If a game that doesnt have as much Hype as HL2 did (such as a first in the series type of game) came out getting people to know about their online ordering service would either be very expensive and difficult or the game would have to make every online publication about video games think that it would be revolutionairy.

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