PDA

View Full Version : Kerry Conran-this guy's the Captain;)


dragonfollower
01-31-2005, 09:50 PM
I recently watched the making of Sky Captain and I was very inspired by Kerry Conran's struggle to get his movie made.

Obviously by now most people know the fact that this movie was filmed almost entirely against bluescreen. But it's still something to marvel at. This had been the dream of mine since way back in '98. A buddy and I had big plans to do this, but never did get a working bluescreen set up. Seeing what Kerry has done inspired me to give it another try.

Second, the fact that he single-handedly made a six-min. film all on his own using an old computer back in 1998. The computer I currently own puts his to shame by far. It's just very liberating to realize what really is possible if you have a goal and never, ever give up. The technology is there. It's all a matter of talent now. And yes, I know that he spent 4 freaking YEARS working on that 6 min. short. But STILL!

I'm just wondering why there aren't more people out there doing this (indie bluescreen productions I mean)?

This is the type of filmmaking that really inspires me. Digital backlot filmmaking. Where anything you can imagine, you can put on film. Where the filmmaker is also the animator...... Live action elements combined with CG animation and backdrops.

Kerry Conran inspired me, so I thought I'd see if there was anyone else out there doing this whole digital backlot thing.

-Brian

RobertoOrtiz
02-02-2005, 04:53 AM
Amen...

The DVD should be required viewing for anybody wanting to do an indie fx movie.

-R

KOryH
02-02-2005, 08:00 AM
Yeah, watching the special features made me feel guilty for not liking the movie.
The process was quite a marvel and the dedication to it by the film makers was like none I had ever seen. It is just unfortunate that they lost most of that magic in the last third of the film.
I would however reccomend it to anyone working in film to see some inovative spirit and coolness.

DAZZAN
02-02-2005, 02:03 PM
I recently watched the making of Sky Captain and I was very inspired by Kerry Conran's struggle to get his movie made.

Obviously by now most people know the fact that this movie was filmed almost entirely against bluescreen. But it's still something to marvel at. This had been the dream of mine since way back in '98. A buddy and I had big plans to do this, but never did get a working bluescreen set up. Seeing what Kerry has done inspired me to give it another try.

Second, the fact that he single-handedly made a six-min. film all on his own using an old computer back in 1998. The computer I currently own puts his to shame by far. It's just very liberating to realize what really is possible if you have a goal and never, ever give up. The technology is there. It's all a matter of talent now. And yes, I know that he spent 4 freaking YEARS working on that 6 min. short. But STILL!

I'm just wondering why there aren't more people out there doing this (indie bluescreen productions I mean)?

This is the type of filmmaking that really inspires me. Digital backlot filmmaking. Where anything you can imagine, you can put on film. Where the filmmaker is also the animator...... Live action elements combined with CG animation and backdrops.

Kerry Conran inspired me, so I thought I'd see if there was anyone else out there doing this whole digital backlot thing.

-Brian

Well,its a long story,but i fell out of filmmaking life to fullfill a dream.......I won a big Amatuer Award in 1992 for my 1st film 10 mins,beating 6000 entrys to the punch i also won Best Visual effects & Lighting award as well......Thae people at the awards ceramony at Bafta House Piccadilly W1 asked me when i picked up my awards what my next film would be.....So i said i was brought up on blockbusters so i want to make a hollywood blockbuster on my Pc at home,and forgo all the trying to make it bullshit that a lot of filmmakers get wrapped up in.....well it got a good laugh from the audience.....then they stopped when they realized i was not jokeing!

Anyway time marches on and now im on year 11 still in my bedroom,going to work in the morning,and being the filmaker Batman at night.

Plenty of regrets......and ive changed over the years ,but its still a massive obsession.

Plenty of more story.....but you have to keep on going.

DorkmanScott
02-03-2005, 12:20 AM
There's an entire subculture of Star Wars-based homebrew films (aka fan films) out there, many of which are doing this very thing.

The one that ushered them into the new digital age, with digital backdrops, is Duality (http://www.crewoftwo.com); released in 2001, made on two Macs over the course of six months, Sky Captain just seemed like a logical extension of it.

Frankly, when Sky Captain came on the scene my first thought was "Duh...took this long?" :p

M. Scott

dragonfollower
02-03-2005, 07:01 AM
Yeah, I've seen the Star Wars fan films. Some of them are pretty good. I guess what I was meaning was something original. Y'know, not taking a pre-existing idea, but instead doing your own thing. I don't see too many of those projects (original idea+3D elements/compositing/digital effects).

-Brian

michaeljr
02-04-2005, 04:34 PM
I to enjoyed the Sky Captain DVD, although I do not like the film. For me the story just wasn't there and some of the stuff, all be it a "fantasy" film set in a real world, just didn't seem plausible. Things like 200mph air plane chases down city streets and pullin 90 degree turns around a corner without crashing just didn't work for me.

After seeing the DVD now I have a bit of a different tune. It's just a shame for it's commercial value some of the money wasn't given to a writter to spruce up and make the story work better. It's like it wanted to be Indiana Jones, just didn't have the "Chops" for it. It was like a high end produced TV show.

But now it to in it's own way has made me go, man, why didn't I do that? Got the same hardware and software, good camera, and geeze, half of them never worked on a movie before, I suck. So I am also trying my hand at this "digital" tale where instead of building a desk, I comp it in. Even though I could probably build the desk easier by hand, it will be a challenge to do it in 3D.

I don't have any plans, tutorials or anything yet, but if it helps anyone, take a look at my page where I have some photos of the large green screen I just erected in my garage. All built for about 100$ from components you can get at your local hardware store. If it helps anyone, I will even post the actually color matched green screen paint based off a sample of actual 60$ Roscoe Chroma paint. Then you can go in and pay 20$ a gallon for the closet color to the what the pros used. (although that just the first part of many steps I am learning on the way)

www.mjrworld.com (http://www.mjrworld.com/)

I hope next week to start filming to get some work in the can. I just haven't put up tracking markers on the screen yet, so that's the next step.

michael JR.

dragonfollower
02-07-2005, 04:02 PM
Michaeljr:

That's some cool stuff on your site. Your camera rocks (I only have a Sony digital-8). And I really like the green screen too. Any tips on how to build one? (I live in a basement apartment right now.)

Here's a clip from one of the movies I've done. I was finally able to get it online. The goal here was to combine live action elements with 3D characters and backdrops. It's not Sky Captain by any stretch of the imagination, but hopefully it'll be a "first step into a much LARGER world";)

Here's a clip from one of the movies I've done. The goal here was to combine live action elements with 3D characters and backdrops.

Here's a clip from one of the movies I've done. The goal here was to combine live action elements with 3D characters and backdrops.

http://daringstudios.com/Squishshort.mov

P.S.: The music is a temp track that'll eventually be replaced...just so ya know.

-Brian

P.S.: The music is a temp track that'll eventually be replaced...just so ya know.

-Brian

-Brian

michaeljr
02-08-2005, 01:18 AM
Thanks Dragon, I hope to actually use that cool stuff to do something other than just build it and let it sit like it has been. Yes, the PDX10 is an amazing little camera no one really knows about. I think it was Sony's little Frankenstien camera. It's a super charged comsumer camera with bits and pieces from all it's other cameras. It's more of a throw away news camera. One that a news crew say in Iraq could carry around and not worry it looks like they have RPG on their shoulder or run away easier with than a 20,000$ betacam system.

I don't have any tutorials or step by steps yet, cause I don't have any finished work done to prove my processes.

But I can give you a quick low down on what I would do. I like Home Depot, so I will use them for my shopping list, but any hardware store should work.

First, go back to my web page, I posted a new image last night under New Work - Green Screen 2, for now until I get a help page up. You will see a paint LABEL, this is color matched Chroma green paint. Print that and take it to Home Depot.

Buy

1. 9x12 canvas drop cloth, cost about 22$, yes it has seams, but that won't matter, your camera won't see them.
2. 2 4x4 or a 1 4x8 of flat panel hardboard, it's this brown panel board, shiny flat on one side, rough on the other. 4$ for the 4x4 or 7$ for the 4x8, this will be your floor.
3. one quart of Glidden green screen paint based off my label 8$ quart, 17$ or so for gallon
4. Paint brush or roller, your choice.
5. some blue painters tape, about 3$, not sure of the width, depends on distance from your camera, I haven't done any test yet, use these peices for tracking markers if you are going to move the camera.
6. 1x3 piece of oak trim, couple feet long.

take the wood and cut it up into equal strips, pre drill holes in it, the screw the wood, into the top of the canvas, then into a STUD in your wall, use some long screws, atleast 3 inches, drape the cloth down the wall and roll the rest to give you a nice transistion area. place your wood sheets on the floor, now paint, need probably 2 coats, then put markers on there.

(you take responsbility if you put holes in your wall ok? :) )

trust me, you can't just TACK it up on the wall, painted canvas this big is going to weight 2- or more pounds and if you fell against it, it's all going to come down in hurry.

for light, do it cheap, buy 2 or 4 cheap work lamps, $5 to $7, a box of 10 flourescant bulbs, 20$ for that, figure out if you want to hang them from the ceiling or off the walls. or get some type of stands. just get a good even light over your screen and actors two if you want.

if you want to light seperatly the actors, to give them shadows and such, depeneding on your space, you can then use some FROSTED white halogen bulbs in any cheap reflector lamp, use the White ones cause the clear halogens cast the shadows and shapes of the filements inside onto everything. 2x150 Phillips bulbs cost abour 4$

and there you go, I'd say 100$ for the whole thing, maybe a weekend for the work.

that's the budget way without having to get welders, drill presses and table saws like I had.

crap, I should write this up with all the product numbers and simple how two instruction shouldn't I cause this is the 2nd time today I've replied to a post like this :)

well I hope that gives you a starting point. remember, I've learned the hard way, it's not the money and equipment you put into that, it's the work you do with what you have that will matter in the end. my point is, that if you make something good with a Digital 8 and a 100$ green screen, that's going to make a bigger impact than if you made something just good with a 5000$ HDV camera and a 1000$ green screen setup. when people, espeically effect people looking to hire you will be far more impressed with doing more with less.

love the dog man, makes me want to have my dog run around, ha, I actually have some green screen of him around here somewhere!

mJR
www.mjrworld.com (http://www.mjrworld.com/)

dragonfollower
02-09-2005, 09:00 PM
Thanks Michaeljr for the advice. I'll be referring to this a lot I'm sure.

And just so everyone knows, I updated the link to the film. The other one kept going down.

http://daringstudios.com/Squishshort.mov

-Brian

Cathy
02-23-2005, 06:57 PM
<<<I'm just wondering why there aren't more people out there doing this (indie bluescreen productions I mean)?>>>

We're out here, we're just too busy making our little films and going to our day-jobs to toot our own horns. I've been on the same project since 2001 and have MAYBE 3 minutes of usable clips.

Never Give-up, Never Surrender!

Cathy
http://www.digitalbacklot.net (http://www.digitalbacklot.net/)

anesthan
02-24-2005, 01:35 AM
Hi

I'm interested in this type of stuff and this thread has guiven me lots of ideas. Good stuff guys.

Anesthan

members only hunter
02-27-2005, 03:06 AM
i don't know if any one has seen my project but we are working on a indy project that is kinda like this too. only thing is that it is backwards. that is that we are going to film in the backgrounds and 3d-cgi the characters. this is kinda animation type thing. i started this on the screenwriting forum but i'm looking to include others as directors, cinematographers, character artists and musicians. the current thread can be seen here:
http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=202545
and if you are interested in participating please email me at:
mailhunterlowe@yahoo.com
thanks for reading and i will make a new thread soon to tyr and round up some more participation.

chris

scotttygett
02-27-2005, 07:50 PM
I just noticed that there's no mention of the green screen thread here, so here it is:

http://cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=208285

Polaroid on the lights and lens, hyperfocal focussing if you're not using video with infinite depth of field, attention to wardrobe and make-up -- the things that make a mountain of difference.

I see a time where we don't light at all during green screen, but more about that below. In the meantime, someone on the set needs to know what a gobo is and when to use it...

Incidentally, if the paint doesn't have a good enough spectrum, there's always doing this at the lights. Some Rosco filters have great properties.

I wonder if we shouldn't be doing some sort of "z buffer" lighting using beam splitters or video-assist units at this point though. IR lighting at the camera only -- that sort of thing, and then getting mattes from that to load into Premiere, instead of inferring it from edges using whatever those programs are for things like "X3D".

At SIGGRAPH five years ago, or more, a half dozen outfits were developing some powerful inferred photogrammetry routines, so the whole "light it in post" approach may be closer than we think. Shoot with four cameras and predetermined lighting, and then load it into MAYA for all the tweaking your heart desires. The surfaces will probably be a bear to reverse-assign, but hey, that's more work for us, I suppose. Or more cameras dedicated to surface pass alpha generation: LightWave has a custom object feature that assigns every object a different gray for extracting 256 object mattes.

As long as we're shooting the backgrounds first,...

CGTalk Moderation
02-27-2006, 08:00 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.