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View Full Version : Is gnomon a good school to go to?


Joab
01-26-2005, 04:50 AM
Hi I was just woundering what people thing about Gnomon. www.gnomon3d.com (http://www.gnomon3d.com)

Stonepilot
01-26-2005, 05:30 AM
Best investment I made. Out of all the guys that went through the program with me 6 in all i think. we're all working. We've been working for almost two years now. And as far as I know of the class that fallowed. they have all found employment as well. If you have the cash and you know you won't goof off invest the money. I have no bad things to say about the place. its awesome. Good luck.

Ergi
01-26-2005, 08:38 PM
I went through the certificate program also. Same class with the pilot up here. Learned a lot, got plenty freelance gigs before finishing, and got a couple of job offers as soon as i finished school. If you go, prepare to work hard. You can have great teachers, but if you dont do your part, you will not go anywhere. I averaged 12 hour days studying and learning while there. I feel the same as the above speaker. One of the best investments i have made.

good luck

PHO 75
01-26-2005, 10:30 PM
A question for the Gnomon certificate grads out there. Would you recommend this program for someone who's focus is more on character animation. I've been doing some research about the certificate program and not too many people have mentioned it in this forum. Also another thing that the grads may be able to set straight. I think the misconception about Gnomon is that people think it's a technical school and the main focus is teaching different software and no traditional art. I know that there are custom programs that are like that but I'm talking more about the certificate program. The lenght is almost 2 years, I can't imagine that being the case. After taking a look at the ciriculum the program seems to be well rounded. I'm asking this because the school seems very solid and the fact that it's taught by industry professionals should make it a more sought after education. Doesn't appear to be so.

azshall
01-28-2005, 06:57 PM
I to went to through the certificate program. The class ahead of Ergi and Pilot ... What they've both said really can sum up what anyone going through the school can say. I learned an insane amount, got some freelance work before I finished the program and got hired directly out of school at Zoic.

Hands down, it is the best investment I've made like stone pilot said... Considering I already burnt myself once in school going to Arizona. I wasn't about to just jump into another boat to go nowhere at the end.

As well, be prepared like Ergi said to pull all nighters and work extremely hard. Gnomon is a really great school, the atmosphere is awesome and the location is great. In my humble opinion, what other school in tihs area offers classes taught by top-notch veterans who've been IN THIS FIELD for at least 10 years or so. What other school offers this, in one of the biggest areas of this industry. You have almost every major studio within 20 miles of Gnomon (and in most cases much less). You have dozens and dozens of small houses planted everywhere. Hope any of our words help.

cheers

Seth

kshin
01-28-2005, 07:05 PM
Wow, it's like a mini reunion! Sup little O and my crazy albanian friend!
Gnomon has quite a few traditional arts classes to suppliment their digital curriculum. Many of the instructors for those classes are graduates of Art Center in Pasadena and they're very good at what they do. The character animation instructors are great too. I made a career change to get into 3D, and I think that Gnomon made that transition as easy as possible. Great school, cool people, awsome instructors, great atmosphere. But in the end, what really matters is how much you apply yourself. I spent, (along with the other guys who posted here) at least 12 hours a day in the certificate program sitting in front of a maya viewport. I always beleived that the best instructors in the world can't help someone who isn't committed to learning. So with that in mind, if you want to get into 3D, Gnomon is a great place to learn. If you want to check out the school, give them a call and arrange a tour. They'll take you around the school, and answer any questions you might have. Good Luck!

Fahrija
01-28-2005, 07:13 PM
If I would live nearby - I would do it > thatīs for sure. The dvdīs already show the great potential in terms of learning things. The input by joining a class then must be amazing.

Greetings and have a good time at gnomon. :)

Fahrija

dRay
01-28-2005, 08:12 PM
A question for the Gnomon certificate grads out there. Would you recommend this program for someone who's focus is more on character animation. I've been doing some research about the certificate program and not too many people have mentioned it in this forum. Also another thing that the grads may be able to set straight. I think the misconception about Gnomon is that people think it's a technical school and the main focus is teaching different software and no traditional art. I know that there are custom programs that are like that but I'm talking more about the certificate program. The lenght is almost 2 years, I can't imagine that being the case. After taking a look at the ciriculum the program seems to be well rounded. I'm asking this because the school seems very solid and the fact that it's taught by industry professionals should make it a more sought after education. Doesn't appear to be so.
Yes, you can focus on character animation at Gnomon! I completed the certificate program in December of 2003. By March of 2004 I was working as a character animator on a direct-to-video animated series, and for the last 8 months I've been working as a character animator on an animated feature film.

It is true that the Gnomon certificate program teaches students to be generalists in cg and visual effects. However, if you find a focus that you love, and you work hard, the administration will work with you to help you achieve your goals. If you want to break into CG/Visual Effects, Gnomon is a great place start!

-Derek

ZippZopp
01-30-2005, 02:47 AM
I'm attending Gnomon now and am in my sixth term. it is going by incredibly fast, a little scary at times to think i'll be done in june. I've learned so much since i've been here. I had tried learning 3d on my own prior to attending and that just didn't work for me. the amount i've learned in the 16 months i've been here is amazing. I don't know of any other schools that offer what gnomon offers. You can't beat being taught by industry professionals.

each term has required me to put more and more time into my work. i spend most of my time here doing work, learning new things etc. i put about 70 hours a week into doing work, going to class, learning new things etc. like a lot of schools you will get out what you put into it. if you're going to slack off obviously you're work won't be too good. If you're looking to get into this sort of thing be ready to sacrifice a lot of things for 2 years.

like kshin said, if you're seriously interested come by the school and get a tour...if you come on a thursday i'll give you one myself.

-pete

jeremybirn
01-30-2005, 03:05 AM
I didn't go there, but I have visited it, and know some of the instructors (who used to go to school with me at ACCD Pasadena.) Gnomon seems like a really good deal in professional training, with high quality art courses, instructors, and software courses. Best of all, it is run by people who genuinely love art and computer graphics, and are trying to make a terrific school that delivers the kind of courses they would like to have themselves - it's not just run by bureaucrats and business people like many of the schools out there.

-jeremy

darktding
01-30-2005, 04:41 AM
how can u say such a thing Jeremy! you teach at one! :deal:

Scooby
01-30-2005, 09:21 PM
Hey Guys. Good to see the Gnomon Grads are out there! I am also a proud Gnomon Grad and am way way out there. I graduated in 2004 and as the other guys said I had freelance before I finished and have been working in Melbourne Australia for the last 3 months on a film.

The DVD's are great and if the full certificate cost is prohibitive they will really teach you a lot of great info about 3D and related arts. They are a great substitute for the full certificate. BUT!!!.... But the certificate is even more valuable than the DVD's because you are forced to learn more than what you might do on your own, and the amazing tidbits and energy and answers to questions you pick up from instructors who just got off work from Sony, and Disney and Dreamworks, etc.. to meet with you is too valuable to reason away. It's Gold I tell ya, Gold in them thar hills!!!

Actually my job that I have now came directly as a result of the instructors I interacted with. When I spoke with my boss and he heard my instructors were his friends I was invited for an interview in Emeryville and got the job 2 days later and left to Australia 5 days after that.

Now for the key to it all. Like Ergy and Derek and the other guys said.
IT TAKES WORK! YOUR WORK! AND LOTS OF IT!
Ride the Gnomon rep and don't put your shoulder to the wheel and you will end up dissappointed.

That's it, G'day all.

Clint

ZippZopp
01-31-2005, 02:01 AM
I didn't know you were in Australia clint! thats pretty damn cool!! how do you like it there compared to LA?

Stonepilot
02-02-2005, 06:43 AM
holy crap clint is in Australia. that's awesome. what kind of work are you doing there.

-I have to add that I also got my current job cause of my instructor (kevin Chen). he knew the senior artist at the studio that i've been for the past 9 months and he put me in touch with him. he even went through the trouble of shooting the guy an email telling him to expect my reel. Kevin's the best.

So you will meet some people that will more than likely play a huge roll in getting you that first job that's so hard to get. I swear alex needs to write us all checks for preaching about gnomon.

Spritemare
02-02-2005, 01:57 PM
Out of curiosity, how much does it cost to go there? When I was serious about going to Full Sail and found out that it was a one year program that cost $35,000, I almost laughed in thier face.

PHO 75
02-02-2005, 04:59 PM
last i checked it was 38 thousand for the 21 month certificate program.

Spritemare
02-02-2005, 05:25 PM
jesus...you could get 2 master's degrees for that money.

beaker
02-02-2005, 06:24 PM
jesus...you could get 2 master's degrees for that money.Maybe at a state school, but not at an art school. Ringling and ACCAD and many other highend art schools these days cost around 20k-25k a year.

o-v
02-02-2005, 08:29 PM
hi there...

do u guys know some compareable school to gnomon in mid europe?

XEngineer
02-21-2005, 08:50 PM
A question for the Gnomon certificate grads out there. Would you recommend this program for someone who's focus is more on character animation. I've been doing some research about the certificate program and not too many people have mentioned it in this forum. Also another thing that the grads may be able to set straight. I think the misconception about Gnomon is that people think it's a technical school and the main focus is teaching different software and no traditional art. I know that there are custom programs that are like that but I'm talking more about the certificate program. The lenght is almost 2 years, I can't imagine that being the case. After taking a look at the ciriculum the program seems to be well rounded. I'm asking this because the school seems very solid and the fact that it's taught by industry professionals should make it a more sought after education. Doesn't appear to be so.

Hey Pho. I'm a student at gnomon right now, and I have a little different advice from everyone else here. If you know you want to be a character animator, then I would not enter the certificate program. There's too much extra stuff and you can save a lot of money by just taking the classes on an extension basis or entering a program that focuses only on animation, like VFS, or maybe animation mentor. I actually got accepted into VFS, but decided to come here instead because I wanted a broader education. But, if I knew that all I wanted to be was a character animator, I think going to VFS' character animation program would have been a better, cheaper, and faster choice.

As far as art classes go, there are some really good production design classes here. Keep in mind that Gnomon is like a mini offshoot of the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. So, there is a strong connection with the style and teaching methods with Art Center (only with analog classes).

And as far as having industry professionals teaching - that's mostly true, but that doesn't necessarily translate into being a good teacher. And I would have to say that the quality of any class you take anywhere is based on the professionalism, preparation and ability to teach of the specific instructor. I've had a few teachers here that have worked on a ton of stuff, but they just weren't good teachers. Luckily, you have a ton of resources here - DVDs, other students, other teachers etc. that can make up for the shortfalls. So don't expect to just sit in class and come out knowing everything.

Good luck!

KOKE
02-21-2005, 09:07 PM
I dont know the school, but if its half as good as their DVDs are it will surely be an awesome place to study.

Alex seems to know what hes doing :thumbsup:

I start VFS in October though.

:D

PHO 75
02-21-2005, 09:38 PM
Hey Pho. I'm a student at gnomon right now, and I have a little different advice from everyone else here. If you know you want to be a character animator, then I would not enter the certificate program. There's too much extra stuff and you can save a lot of money by just taking the classes on an extension basis or entering a program that focuses only on animation, like VFS, or maybe animation mentor. I actually got accepted into VFS, but decided to come here instead because I wanted a broader education. But, if I knew that all I wanted to be was a character animator, I think going to VFS' character animation program would have been a better, cheaper, and faster choice.

As far as art classes go, there are some really good production design classes here. Keep in mind that Gnomon is like a mini offshoot of the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. So, there is a strong connection with the style and teaching methods with Art Center (only with analog classes).

And as far as having industry professionals teaching - that's mostly true, but that doesn't necessarily translate into being a good teacher. And I would have to say that the quality of any class you take anywhere is based on the professionalism, preparation and ability to teach of the specific instructor. I've had a few teachers here that have worked on a ton of stuff, but they just weren't good teachers. Luckily, you have a ton of resources here - DVDs, other students, other teachers etc. that can make up for the shortfalls. So don't expect to just sit in class and come out knowing everything.

Good luck!

Xengineer, hey man thanks a lot for the reply. A few months back this was the situtation I was in, deciding between Gnomon and VFS. I tried to do as much research as possible about both schools but it was tough getting feedback about Gnomon compared to VFS which you could find new information on just about everyday on this forum. After finally talking to a few Gnomon students I was basically told the same thing you've stated which is that the program takes you through a lot of different areas. I would love to take the time to explore and learn the different aspects of the field but given my situation I just don't see the point. I have experience with character animation and that's what I intend to focus on. I don't doubt the school one bit and it seems like kids are being pulled into the industry straight from the program but it just wouldn't be the best route IMO. And there are other factors also, like the higher tuition and the length of the program. Thanks for the reply, really reaiffirmed my decision to stick with VFS.

XEngineer
02-22-2005, 05:25 AM
Alright, cool! It was a tough choice for me too. Sometimes I think about it and realize, "I could have been done by now!" if I had gone to VFS. But, it's all good. I just wish I had my own computer and a locker like at VFS! Good luck!

aonikoyi
02-23-2005, 01:19 PM
Its been my dream to be a vfx artist and I have been investigating different schools. So far my top choices are The Dave School and Gnomon. My preference is Gnomon but when I called over there it was very discouraging. Here is a summary of the conversation I had.

Basically I called and said that I was very interested in attending and the person gave me the deadlines for turning in applications/portfolios and such. As I have an IT background and no Art experience whatsoever, they said not to bother applying because "Employers want Artists, not technicians" .

I agree to some extent but I dont like, well I hate for someone to tell me I cant do something especially in America for that matter . I was quite hurt as a matter of fact because its my dream. I have been fidling around with this stuff for the last couple of years and decided that I needed a more foocused education.

Yes I know that having some kind of Art education or skills would certaiinly be of an advantage but do you mean to tell me that everyone in the vfx industry are artists. in the sense that they have solid arts background. and whos to say someone like me couldnt be successful at this. As long as Im hungry and I have the desire and Im paying , I think thats all I need to be successfull. At my age I cannot afford to enrol in some community college art class. Though it would be good for me, the time it just not there. Having a bachelors and Masters. Im really not crazy about going to school just to earn a paycheck. I want to do something that I am passionate about.

So I hope someone is feeling me out there in my delimma. So I am looking for advice on what to do ... (violin stops!)

ShiroiOokami
02-23-2005, 04:48 PM
Aon, by vfx you mean explosions, fire, etc or do you mean CG (animation, modelling, etc)? Assuming you mean the first then I would not think you would have to be an artist, of course it would help, but I would think vfx would deal with taking real life effects and recreating them for your specific look/scene. I have not reached the vfx class yet but I hear it deals with a lot more of the techinical end which might be something you would be good at anyways.

I think having art background for a modeler would be highly recommended if that is what you meant by vfx. Being able to sketch out a character before I model it helps soooo much and being able to sketch accessories, clothes, and whatnot also helps because drawing can be done so much faster and thus speeds up your modeling because you already know how it should look. If you are a good sculptor then that will help even more with the modeling, and BOTH of these skills are good because you can show someone what you plan on doing, you could think of it as storyboarding for modelers :)

The main factor though is how passionate you are about it. Sooo, many people have dropped out or failed in my class so far that I think only a little over half will remain after the current classes. I have class 5 days a week for 8 hours each day and work on stuff outside of class for about 20~30 hours additional each week. I do not have a job because it would be impossible. to juggle that as well. I believe Gnomon is setup similairly to my school so if that sounds acceptable then go for it, you are limited by yourself.

aonikoyi
02-23-2005, 05:22 PM
Thanks for the reply. So are you saying these guys may be failing because of a Lack of an art background? Do you attend gnomon?

XEngineer
02-23-2005, 07:32 PM
Aonikoyi: The thing about Gnomon that most people don't really have a good feel for, is that there are 3 things you can do to take classes here: 1) join the certificate program, 2) take the fast track, or 3) just take individual classes (on an extension basis). The certificate program covers a very broad range of classes, from storyboarding and character design to all aspects of Maya and VFX. So, if you're not good at art, then you're going to flounder in the art classes and, honestly, you'll probably feel like you've wasted your money. And the problem is, the classes are all limited to 12 people due to the lab sizes. So the certificate program really is NOT for everyone that can pay for it.

But, there is a significant group of people here that are NOT in the certificate program and take alot of the same classes as the certificate students, but aren't officially in the certificate program. Some only take a few classes. Some come out of Gnomon having almost the same education, make a demo reel, and then get jobs. They take only the classes that they want, meet alot of the same people, and then move on. The only problem with doing this is that you have to work around the classes that are scheduled mainly for certificate students, and you don't get a discount on the prices. You will probably end up taking fewer classes over a longer duration, but you could save money if you focus on only a handful of classes that you really need.

And just to let you know, I'm 35 and went through 2 engineering careers before deciding on going into VFX. I went to a community college to bone up on my art skills which I hadn't really used since high school. Then I got accepted to VFS and Gnomon, and decided to come here. I've been drawing most of my life and having that skill and the eye to understand what looks good, really helps with your final results.

Anyway, hope that sheds some light.

aonikoyi
02-23-2005, 07:38 PM
So would you say its worth packing up my bags and moving there even though I am not in the Certificate program? It doesnt seem workthwile thats all without some kind of track. That is one of the reasons why I was interested in the program because of the structure and and rell rounded curriculum.

ShiroiOokami
02-23-2005, 08:21 PM
No, I highly doubt they are failing for not have an art background. Most fail tests and quizzes, forget to turn in assignments or dont have them done, fall asleep in lecture, etc etc. Some may though not be able to effectively take the image in their mind and put it in 3d, much the same problem someone workin in 2d has. I think that you WOULD though be able to get reference pictures and use those to help you in your work and be just fine. And no, I am not going to gnomon, I attend Full Sail....I could not tell you what school to choose, but I can say what many have said, that no matter what school you attend how you turn out is based on your attitude during school not so much the school itself.

Affinity
02-23-2005, 08:28 PM
Hello, I too am interested in attending a school as renound as Gnomon. However, I am 15 years of age and still have to wait until I graduate high school. I am learning 3dsmax using the 3dsmax 6 BIBLE and am going along smoothly. My question is, what kind of resume do I need to build to show a school like this that I am worthy of attending?
Thank you sincerely,

-Affinity

joshonline
02-24-2005, 01:03 AM
I really want to go to the school...

Do you have to be gifted at drawing to go to the school?

I am bad at it but I love photoshop and maya...

I have been using maya for a week now and photoshop for 2 years for webdesign...

What do you think?

DangerAhead
02-24-2005, 07:49 AM
Drawing always helps but you don't need it for Gnomon. In fact, I believe they have those courses there now.

But don't avoid learning how to do it. If you know how to convey ideas in pencil it translates directly to the computer.

Capel
02-24-2005, 09:01 AM
I have experience with character animation and that's what I intend to focus on.

I go to Gnomon too, and i'm a character animator. Be advised that there are only two classes that you're gonna want to take. character animation I and II. The classes are awesome, and if you are at all competent, then it's gonna be more than enough to learn the principles of animation.

I say, and this is only if you are REALLY self-motivated, go to gnomon, take the two classes and animate your ass off during and after your classes are over. Sit in on the same classes the next semester and the next, which the teachers are completely cool with, and animate at home until your reel is good enough to get you into the professional world.

Seriously, there are only so many principles a teacher can drill into your head, and from that point on it's all about putting in the hours at home.

ANIMATION IS TIME SPENT.

XEngineer
02-24-2005, 04:21 PM
Hey Chris. I've seen your stuff in the Character Animation class folder. Your reel is really good. Are you still unemployed?? I heard Lino was trying to get you a job. What happened with that?

XEngineer
02-24-2005, 04:43 PM
So would you say its worth packing up my bags and moving there even though I am not in the Certificate program? It doesnt seem workthwile thats all without some kind of track.

If you take classes at Gnomon and you're in this environment, you're going to learn alot about the subject matter. Whether it's worth it, is too subjective for me to answer. Alot of people get what they want. Others don't. You may have unrealistic goals. Or maybe you'll be the best artist ever to come out of here. Who knows. There are no guarantees with anything you do. I'm definitely learning alot and meeting a lot of cool people, and doing some really cool stuff. If I get the job I really want, then it'll all be worth it. So, it all remains to be seen.

If you have schools in mind, I suggest you go visit them and really talk to the regular students and do a lot of research. That will help prepare you with your decision. Good luck!

freakmoomin
02-24-2005, 07:24 PM
38 grand..............

i'd self teach, go on a bumper holiday and bribe someone on the inside to get me a job with that.

;-)

sparkleegrl
03-03-2005, 07:00 PM
Is it only good for 3D animation? I am more focused on 2D and Motion Graphics, not so much 3D animation although I do want to learn some of that as well.

azshall
03-03-2005, 07:11 PM
Is it only good for 3D animation? I am more focused on 2D and Motion Graphics, not so much 3D animation although I do want to learn some of that as well.

No. They have plenty of digital painting, matte painting, texturing classes. Those all focus on 2D aspects of CG. As well, they offer design, sculpting and life drawing classes. Gnomon has a pretty wide range of artistic direction to choose from, although it seems the school is more known as far as 3D goes. They have expanded into other areas quite a bit though. I graduated in 2001 and as far as I know, they have added like 2 more terms since I left. I went through 5 terms and finished, I believe there is possibly 7 now, correct me if I am wrong. It is a good school overall. As its been stated in previous postings on this thread, the teachers and faculty are industry professionals. They're not people who once worked, they're not people who aspire to work, they're people who finish a DAY of work to come teach afterwards at night. Whether they are able to convey the curriculum to everyone in an understandable fashion, you are being taught by industry professionals. You're not being taught by someone who just plays with the software and likes to make neat whirlygigs with it. ..... Just my 2 cents :)

elfufu
03-04-2005, 05:46 AM
Kristin is cool

DangerAhead
03-04-2005, 07:18 AM
Yes, Sparkle. It's the best. You'd be hard-pressed to find a better school in the world.

Now, go gettum.

Bsmith
06-17-2005, 02:11 AM
sorry for bring this thead back up...

but I'm thinking about attending...and well I'm most worried about the finanical issue. While I'm not worried about being able to pay for the program...I'm more worried about being able to support myself while living in frickin Hollywood which has to be SUPER expensive.

Now I'm from michigan, and whatever the living expenses here are, its basically doubled in california.

I'm not sure the exact prices but I'm guessing I could prolly live about a month there before I'm wiped clean from money. Even if I was to go part time and get a job it wouldn't make much if a difference.

Anyone have any advice with this topic?

salmansqadeer
07-11-2005, 08:59 AM
hey all

okay i was in the same delimma a while ago about Gnomon... it seems like an absolutely amazing school but there were some problems that i had with their curriculum design etc, i wanna know if these problems are relevent when trying to get jobs in the CG world.

1) the program is a Diploma instead of something like a masters... my other option is SVA in NY which is offering me a masters degree and is about the same price. Im an international student so flying all the way across the world for a diploma seems a little weak - how much of a difference does this make when applying for jobs?

2) THE ENTIRE PROGRAM is based on maya and maya only. The owner of Gnomon used to be a maya employee... do you think its wise to be taught only a single technology in a two year diploma degree? There are a lot of other stuff out there... max softimage etc, and at Gnomon youll only focus on Maya (this was the main contention that my Grafics teacher had when i showed him the program) - how does that effect employment oppertunities if the place your looking to get a job at uses a different platform?

Any reply would be greatly appreciated... plus if anyone knows anything about SVA (School of Visual Arts NY) i would love to hear about it.

Salman....

azshall
07-11-2005, 04:07 PM
1) the program is a Diploma instead of something like a masters... my other option is SVA in NY which is offering me a masters degree and is about the same price. Im an international student so flying all the way across the world for a diploma seems a little weak - how much of a difference does this make when applying for jobs?


Definately, a Diploma is nothing the same as a Masters. A masters probably says a lot more, but fact of the matter is, paper means shit (sorry to be blunt). What matters, is, can you get your work done, meet a deadline, get shots approved and make it look good, in most times.. under a lot of pressure and stress. Will your Masters help you with that? No, will a Diploma? No. Only the knowledge of what you've learned, do the research. Where do you primarily wish to work? What software is larger in that area or areas. What SHOULD you be learning rather than "This school gives a masters, but they're teaching Bryce" .. Etc ...


2) THE ENTIRE PROGRAM is based on maya and maya only. The owner of Gnomon used to be a maya employee... do you think its wise to be taught only a single technology in a two year diploma degree? There are a lot of other stuff out there... max softimage etc, and at Gnomon youll only focus on Maya (this was the main contention that my Grafics teacher had when i showed him the program) - how does that effect employment oppertunities if the place your looking to get a job at uses a different platform?


The reason why the program is based on Maya and Maya only is because in this general area, 9 times out of 10, they're looking for Maya users. You can go to a big house, and yes, they do use other packages and most often times their own proprietary utilities. For instance, if you want to do Effects in Film, better learn Houdini. Thats about all its used for.

As for Alex being an Ex-Alias employee, so what? In most cases, I would say thats a very good benefit being that he's teaching Alias software. Marcel DeJong is one of the top Alias developers and has been teaching at Gnomon forever. Good luck finding developers of the software that actually teach anywhere else. When I was in Arizona at the crappiest school ever, Al Collins Graphic Design School (now Collins College, their 5th name change or so). They didn't know which way from anything with the software. If we didn't teach ourselves, we were out a lot of money. At Gnomon, you're not getting Joe Schmoe teachers, you're getting developers, industry pros and veterans. They've done the work and almost all have been doing the work for a long time.

As for being worried about learning multiple packages. Good luck. Most packages are so in depth, if you're trying to learn everything at once you're goin to sink. In some cases, yes, other software packages are somewhat easy to dive into once you've got a strong hold of one already. But, its not as easy as just opening and going. The fundamentals are the same, some of the tools and where the tools are, are not the same. Lightwave for instance has a modeler broken out of its main GUI. Maya gives you the ability to animate modeling history.. Fat chance with Lightwave.

All-In-All, weigh the pros and cons of the "Masters" school to the "Diploma" school. You may notice a big difference. Do some research of what you really want to do before you start and set your sites on that. You're only going to hurt yourself by starting something only to realize you wish you were doing something else, because a lot of people tend to do that.

Good Luck.

Seth Hall

XEngineer
07-11-2005, 04:52 PM
salmansqadeer: I basically agree with Seth. 1) You don't need any kind of certificate or degree if you're trying to get into the artistic side (i.e. non-coder) of the business. You could have a PhD, but if you're demo reel sucks, no one is going to hire you. You could be 14 and if your demo reel rocks, you'll get hired. And once you get hired, you've got to know your business, finish what you're assigned, and get along with the people you work with, just like any other job in the world. Whatever school you go to, it should give you the knowledge and time to complete a great reel. 2) Once you learn a package, learning another one is not going to be as hard. I learned Lightwave first and I'm now using Maya. Both have their good points and bad points. But, I want to get into films produced here in Hollywood. So, knowing Maya is almost essential for that. If you want to go into games, you're probably better off learning 3DSMax. Your email really doesn't specify what you're trying to do in CG and what your goals are, so its not easy to give advice to you. Just go to VFXPro.com or awn.com and look at their job boards. Find the jobs you would like to do and look at the qualifications. Then you'll know what kind of software training you might need. And also, Gnomon doesn't ONLY have Maya. Zbrush, Deep Paint, Photoshop, Shake, After Effects, and matchmoving software are taught here. And I think there's even an XSI DVD now.

bsmith: Yup. It's more expensive in L.A. than in Michigan. Everything is more expensive. So get roommates to reduce your rent and don't drive an SUV. If you don't have the money but want to go to Gnomon, get a loan. Not sure what else to tell ya.

salmansqadeer
07-11-2005, 06:13 PM
okay before i start i wanna clarify that i wasnt trying to put Gnomon down in any way or anything... these are just the things that are bothering me as im taking part in the application process to various different schools.

both XEngineer and azshall... thanks a lot for your advice... a lot of what you say makes a lot of sense... especially the part about the fact that one is a diploma and the other is a degree not making squat of a difference...

XEngineer:

im more interested towards cg films, though im a computer science undergrad student (thats PURe coding) iv had five years of classical art training and have continued with classical film through an extracurricular school society. Iv worked on Maya on my own and even tried my ahnd at max but maya appears to be a lot more intuitive... now that youve cleared up that 9 times out of ten (especially for film) itll be maya thats involved thats a huge weight off my shoulders.
I was wondering if you knew what type of work is preferred during the admissions process as part of the portfolio (at Gnomon in specific and cg schools in general) - are they looking for cg work? or is traditional artwork accepted... what about photography? im working on putting together my portfolio for admissions and im really looking into this.

Also, do you think you could give me the starting salary rates that individuals who graduate from a school like Gnomon would get in a CG job? Ill be applying as an international student (im currently residing in pakistan) and will also be taking loans to complete the tuition so this is really important to me and i have no other way of finding out. Any figures that come to mind would do..

thanks... you guys have been a lot of help so far...

StudioJ
07-11-2005, 06:51 PM
I want to go to the gnomon, but there is only one think that block that. I don't speak good English :( I understand it, but not speak or write it well.

geo5sf
07-11-2005, 07:04 PM
Most of us students in California are in the same boat as you financially.. it's just a question of what you are willing to sacrifice. Many of us choose loans... I believe in myself enough to take that burden.

sorry for bring this thead back up...

but I'm thinking about attending...and well I'm most worried about the finanical issue. While I'm not worried about being able to pay for the program...I'm more worried about being able to support myself while living in frickin Hollywood which has to be SUPER expensive.

Now I'm from michigan, and whatever the living expenses here are, its basically doubled in california.

I'm not sure the exact prices but I'm guessing I could prolly live about a month there before I'm wiped clean from money. Even if I was to go part time and get a job it wouldn't make much if a difference.

Anyone have any advice with this topic?

MikeeBaker
07-11-2005, 08:32 PM
Hey yall. I know this is a little off topic but I am going to mail in my portfolio to Gnomon this Wednesday for the Fall term and I was wondering if anyone can give me some quick pointers on things I should/shouldnt include.

I have a lot of charcol drawings, acrylic paintings, some shorts done in Lightwave, some clay stop-motion animations, and some storyboards. Aside for sending EVERYTHING (which Im thinking about doing cuz its all really decent) does anyone have some advice?

Thanks a bunch!

Bsmith
07-11-2005, 09:22 PM
its seems like you have most of it covered.

just include your strongest work of figure studies and concept art.

MikeeBaker
07-11-2005, 10:49 PM
Thank you very much! I really appreciate it!

Any more suggestions?

Bsmith
07-11-2005, 11:55 PM
I'm still debating whether or not to go to gnomon...I'm not sure if I can afford the price of living in LA without being able to work.

XEngineer
07-12-2005, 09:52 PM
XEngineer:

Iv worked on Maya on my own and even tried my ahnd at max but maya appears to be a lot more intuitive... now that youve cleared up that 9 times out of ten (especially for film) itll be maya thats involved thats a huge weight off my shoulders.


Maya is used primarily for film here in L.A. In some countries and areas, XSI seems to be about as strong as Maya. And I heard that the Japanese prefer Lightwave (not sure about that). Anyway, I'm sure if you're around long enough you'll get trained on just about everything.


I was wondering if you knew what type of work is preferred during the admissions process as part of the portfolio (at Gnomon in specific and cg schools in general) - are they looking for cg work? or is traditional artwork accepted... what about photography?


All of the above. But, probably not so much with the photography.


Also, do you think you could give me the starting salary rates that individuals who graduate from a school like Gnomon would get in a CG job?


I dunno, maybe around 50k/year. Again, here in L.A. It can be as low as 30k in some places and for some companies. But the fact is your first jobs may be on a contract basis for only a few months. So, making that kind of money consistently is not a given. Luckily, if you're good and bring alot of things to the table, then you probably won't have a hard time finding work and your salary jumps significantly after a few years. At least that's my impression.

ZippZopp
07-12-2005, 11:19 PM
actually, photography is a very good thing to put into your portfolio. i had a good background in photography before going to Gnomon and I think that was a huge help, especially when dealing with film related work. It is really beneficial to know what an aperture is, an f-stop, exposures, types of film stocks and general camera functionality because it directly relates to film. not only that, but photography is a great way to practice shot framing, composition, lighting and many other things very quickly, especially when dealing with digital cameras. If you've got photography, definately add it in

RabidDonkey
07-12-2005, 11:58 PM
I'm interested in Gnomon but thats still a ways away. (at least 1 year). Im curious however what is needed to get into the certificate program other than money. What skill level 2d or 3d do you need in a portfolio to get in?

orbitalpunk
08-04-2005, 08:28 AM
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elfufu
08-04-2005, 08:40 AM
art institute or art center? I think you got your schools mixed buddy..

Hi guys,

I too am one of the many who wish to attend Gnomon but have questions. My current curiosity is, are there any Gnomon Alumniís here or anywhere that have worked on Pixar films? I truly feel Pixar is the best of the best and it seems everyone is from Arts Institutes. Even the instructors at Gnomon are from AI. So i guess what im getting at is, yes, i know Gnomon is good, but is it good enough to really land you job at a major studio on major project. Or does it really take a AI degree for that level.

And I really dont mean to disrespect Gnomon here. Im very fond of Gnomon. I live 5 minutes away. Seen countless DVD's. As a 3D artist, Alex is a celeb to me. But this is a serious question for serious school with a serious price tag.

Thanks guys
P.S. just got back from Siggraph. Fun Fun Fun...

Seratogui
08-04-2005, 09:26 AM
It's a shame we don't have gnomon classes in europe.
Like say in euh.... :D...... Belgium?
We're buffer zone between england, germany and the netherlands, so finding students wouldn't be a problem :P

XEngineer
08-04-2005, 10:02 AM
Hi guys,

I too am one of the many who wish to attend Gnomon but have questions. My current curiosity is, are there any Gnomon Alumniís here or anywhere that have worked on Pixar films? I truly feel Pixar is the best of the best and it seems everyone is from Arts Institutes. Even the instructors at Gnomon are from AI. So i guess what im getting at is, yes, i know Gnomon is good, but is it good enough to really land you job at a major studio on major project. Or does it really take a AI degree for that level.

And I really dont mean to disrespect Gnomon here. Im very fond of Gnomon. I live 5 minutes away. Seen countless DVD's. As a 3D artist, Alex is a celeb to me. But this is a serious question for serious school with a serious price tag.

Thanks guys
P.S. just got back from Siggraph. Fun Fun Fun...

I'll give you the same advice that I gave my sister - go to school where you want to work. Because, as you probably know, it's not what you know, and it's not who you know, it's who knows you. SO, that being said, I don't know of anyone from Gnomon that works at Pixar. BUT, I'm positive that anyone graduating from the certificate program would have the know how to work at Pixar. The issue is that since a couple Pixar people teach at the Academy of Arts and, say, animationmentor, they get exposed to students and can see who's good. So, out of sheer human nature, those students probably have a leg up on getting into Pixar. If you go to school at Gnomon in L.A., where 80% of the CG work in the US is, then you'll probably get exposure to the people here and will have an easier time finding work in L.A. It's just the nature of being in the area, having graduates you know that start working in the area, and having teachers that are local. I really don't think it's a matter of quality of education as much since it'll be top notch at Gnomon. If you're determined to only work at Pixar, you better get as much exposure to them as possible and you better be damn good. If you go to school in L.A., you're going to get more exposure to people that work at Sony, Dreamworks, Disney, R&H, etc. But, you really haven't identified which field you think you're going into. Gnomon covers all the disciplines, and I have no doubt that some graduates from the school are going to become CG supervisors and TDs in the future, and there are only a handful of schools that I can think of that could provide that kind of education. Your path is yours to choose...

Hotdawg
08-04-2005, 07:22 PM
Hi guys,

I too am one of the many who wish to attend Gnomon but have questions. My current curiosity is, are there any Gnomon Alumniís here or anywhere that have worked on Pixar films? I truly feel Pixar is the best of the best and it seems everyone is from Arts Institutes. Even the instructors at Gnomon are from AI. So i guess what im getting at is, yes, i know Gnomon is good, but is it good enough to really land you job at a major studio on major project. Or does it really take a AI degree for that level.

And I really dont mean to disrespect Gnomon here. Im very fond of Gnomon. I live 5 minutes away. Seen countless DVD's. As a 3D artist, Alex is a celeb to me. But this is a serious question for serious school with a serious price tag.

Thanks guys
P.S. just got back from Siggraph. Fun Fun Fun...

You'll never work at Pixar.

StapleGun
08-04-2005, 08:34 PM
The issue is that since a couple Pixar people teach at the Academy of Arts and, say, animationmentor, they get exposed to students and can see who's good. So, out of sheer human nature, those students probably have a leg up on getting into Pixar.

Don't ever believe anything the Academy of Art tell you about their "Pixar" classes. There's a student who get a job or internship at Pixar every 7 years or so, and Pixar hasn't even been around that long.

As for animationmentor, its too new and has yet to be tested. But from what I've seen, animationmentor and Gnomon actually has respect for art.

Ergi
08-04-2005, 08:52 PM
If your goal is to work at a specific studio, then most probably you wont. You get hired because you are good, not because you really want to be at pixar so you can boast to your friends at the coffe table. A lot of people coming from Art schools get hired because they have a strong art education which they can later apply technically to the project. Gnomon is pragmatic education. They teach you how it is done in the industry, and you learn from good artists. Your sensibilites though are your own. Thats why there is a portfolio check to get in the certificate course. You cant just decide to be, say a compositor, when you dont know what colors look good side by side, framing and the like. Do you see how a film degree would come in handy in that case ?

read this,...an artist talking :

"The time of getting fame for your name on its own is over. Artwork that is only about wanting to be famous will never make you famous. Any fame is a by-product of making something that means something. You don't go to a restaurant and order a meal because you want to have a shit."

orbitalpunk
08-04-2005, 08:53 PM
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Ergi
08-04-2005, 09:02 PM
There are students working at ILM, Imageworks, Rhythm&Hues, Digital Domain etc. I am not sure about Pixar.

If you go to the gnomon website, under news, there is an Alumni Tracking paragraph each month. You can see there where students are working.

good luck

StapleGun
08-04-2005, 09:07 PM
Yes elfufu, your right. Art Center College of Design.



Staplegun, I havenít heard anything from Academy of Art or Art Center or anywhere. Iíve just been reading the resumes of Pixar Artists.

My post wasn't addressed to you. And it's actually a warning to you that a location of a school does not mean that you will have an easier time getting into a company that's near that school. Your work will speak for itself.

orbitalpunk
08-04-2005, 09:25 PM
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StapleGun
08-04-2005, 09:30 PM
Ergi, I never planed on boasting with my friends at the coffee table. I donít even own a coffee table cause I live in a van down by the river!!!

That must obviously be your wish since thatís the first thing that comes to mind. That wasn't necessary.



StapleGun, I donít care about location. Iím concerned with the level of education and i wanted to know which school would help students reach the level of quality of say Pixar, or DreamWorks or blue sky. Pick one! There two very different schools. And i just donít see Gnomon graduates on the Resumes of artists at Pixar or DreamWorks. And that concerned me. So i wanted to ask about it. I donít understand why people have to be jerks about it. Its not all just up to you. Your teachers do actually make a difference. There the ones who inspire you, push you, open your mind to new ideas and techniques. No matter how hard you push yourself, you just donít know until someone teaches your. Wither its a person or book.


Just forget it.

I still think Gnomon is great whatever people may think.

Again, my post wan't really addressed to you. Rather its for everyone. However, if you interpret people here being "jerks," and taking things this personally, then obviously you are not ready for this field.

And any decent artist will appreciate honest opinions. Your focus on Pixar just shows you haven't really thought about why you want to get into this field.

Hotdawg
08-04-2005, 09:36 PM
prick.

I love you.

azshall
08-04-2005, 09:50 PM
So i guess what im getting at is, yes, i know Gnomon is good, but is it good enough to really land you job at a major studio on major project. Or does it really take a AI degree for that level..

First off.... Lets start by saying, .. heh .. you shouldn't be worried abuot the school being good enough to land you a job. Its not about where you were and what you did. Fact of the matter is, can YOU land YOURSELF the job. If you don't have skills, you probably have no chance. Remember, if something looks good, it is good. To be honest, I think Pixar looks for students out of Ringling and Cal Arts. So with that said, Gnomon may have a better chance of getting you into most any other studio, specifically in the Los Angeles area, (but not limiting to just that), which in turn can (with time) lend you a job at Pixar if you're that good. Don't get me wrong, if you're a superstar in the school and you know your stuff, you can get a job, but... Don't count on the school doing everything for you. Its about what and who you know....

az

ML76
08-05-2005, 01:21 AM
Well, I picked up Gnomon's latest brochure at Siggraph the other day and on the last page is a list of the companies graduates work/have worked at. There's about a hundred companies listed, and Pixar and Dreamworks are both there. So, well, there ya go.

Something to think about: I believe schools like Ringling (who had some REALLY good looking student stuff being shown at their Siggraph booth, btw) graduate a lot MORE students in actual numbers than Gnomon, which could be a simple reason why you're seeing so many of them out and about working at these big companies.

More food for thought: One of the counselors at Gnomon told me that often the people that take a little longer to find a job when they graduate are the ones who insist on working at a specific company. No matter how good your skills and education are, you're not going to get hired unless the company has an opening for you and whatever you're skilled at. So sometimes you have to wait, or work somewhere else for a while. Personally, I'm starting at Gnomon in the fall, and I'm excited about my choice and pretty confident that I'm going to find a job when I get out. I don't really care where it is, as long as I'm getting paid to do 3D.

ML

Ergi
08-05-2005, 02:11 AM
dude, i live 15 minutes from gnomon and have yet to see a river. But seriously, take the advice if you want, if not, dont take it. There is so much information about the school and the students and the curriculum online. Plus you can just walk down and meet the people and the students.
My only point is that your perspective seemed to be a bit skewed. You go to school to learn, to get better at what you like to do, to meet other people with your interests, not because your goal is to work at Pixar.

btw my wish would be to be the graphics guy at Weekly World News,...photoshoping up Batboy, bigfoot hookers and Elvis still alive.

Embryosys
08-05-2005, 02:18 AM
btw my wish would be to be the graphics guy at Weekly World News,...photoshoping up Batboy, bigfoot hookers and Elvis still alive


hell yeah!

that or work for conan as well!

K_Digital
08-05-2005, 02:36 AM
last i checked it was 38 thousand for the 21 month certificate program.

all that money for a highly unstable career field.

umbrellasky
10-17-2005, 08:45 PM
Hi all hope no one minds me reopening this thread?

I'm really interested in studying at Gnomon. Has anyone ever taken part in the 10 week courses? and did you get much out of them? I'm especially interested in Matte painting and Enviromental design.

Thanks :)

mike0006
10-22-2005, 03:47 AM
Id have to say that I am really getting what out what I put into my classes here at Gnomon. I'm only taking the intro to maya and figure drawing classes right now, because my drawings suck and I want to focus really hard on that.

The fact is that I am pushing myself harder now that I am in these classes than I was when I was self-educating myself. (wow thats confusing to read) The instructors are extremely helpful and the work they assign gives you alot of room to push yourself.

Example: (keep in mind this is Intro to maya) One assignment we had was to make a NURBS sailboat. While some people just basically copied his 10 min demo, I spent about 4 hours trying to learn how to get ALL of the surfaces to have tangential continuity and adding details that weren't in the demo. LOL, one guy made a kick ass pirate ship.

So really it's all about what you do with what Gnomon has to offer. I'd say that they offer quite a bit.

rblitz7
10-22-2005, 05:16 AM
I know a lot of college kids go to gnomon but has anyone gone there right out of high school? Its funny cause gnomon is like 2 blocks away from my dads house so its kind of silly if I go to college when I have this amazing resource so close. But I still will def go to some kind of college but its just funny to me. But of course you have to be really talented to go right from high school.

evil3d
10-22-2005, 05:49 AM
hello there !!

this is the thread i've been lookin for a long time....

finally found it....

i've planned to specialize in 3d modelling i want to make gr888 quality models like the one's done' by jeff uney, tarique mirza, eddy harison n many other gr88 artists...

i have 3 schools in my list from which i have to chose one...

1) GNOMON
2) Accardamy of Art University
3) VFS

My no:1 choice is GNOMON.

i have no art background. i'm interested in 3d modeling mainly. I’m also interested in studying sculpting, anatomy, drawing etc coz I strongly believe that can aid me a lot in my work and they are the most important stepping stone …

the good things that i have with me r dedication, will power, strong belief that " if u have the intrest u can master it. nomatter what... "

so guyz can u aid me, by lettin me know that if can study all these things from GNOMON.
don't worry i'm ready to work harder n harder. the only thing i need is the guidence...

thankz in advance
3d'evil

Bsmith
10-22-2005, 02:18 PM
well at gnomon you basically learn everything thats used in visual effects. Thats anywhere from Modeling to Compositing to Storyboarding.

So I'm not sure if you can just concentrate on modeling at gnomon, but if you don't mind learning everything else then go for it.

However, I've been seeing some AWESOME modeling reels from VFS for quite some time now. Actually modeling reels is about all I see. So I would highly consider VFS over AUU and maybe over Gnomon even but not so sure on that. I've wanted to go to Gnomon for a long time now but I just am not able afford to live in LA right now and not work and go to school.

ML76
10-22-2005, 07:18 PM
3devil:

if you are strictly interested in modeling, you can definitely go to Gnomon and study just that. that's one reason the school's so cool. you can also study sculpting and figure drawing there.

in the certificate program we study EVERYTHING, so that's probably not for you, and without an art background of any kind you'd have a hard time getting in anyways. but you CAN totally make up your own curriculum. lots of people do.

i would go through the Gnomon course catalogue and pick out the classes you think would give you the skills you need to be a modeler. make up a little timeline of what to take when. then give the school a call and see which classes they would recommend, and compare and contrast. see if you feel you'd be learning enough.

i'm sure they will be very helpful at Gnomon if you call. i can't really make any firm recs on classes right now cuz i'm only first term, but i do know that the sculpting and figure drawing teachers are seriously top notch. also, i'm hoping to get kevin hudson for modeling next term, and he's freakin amazing (polar express, harry potter, etc, etc..).

sorry for the novel length reply. i just love my school. good luck to you!

ML

TroyC
11-07-2005, 10:54 PM
Hey Guys,
Does anyone have any experience with Gnomon's Maya Fast Track program? I am currently a college student who will graduate this spring with a bachelors degree in animation. I am interested in getting into the animation end of the VFX field, I just didn't know how i would make the transition to the West Coast and land that first job. The program I am about to finish has given me a strong understanding of traditional art skills (drawing, painting, color theory, design, photography, etc.) I also have a good basis in the principles of animation (my current professor is a former Disney feature animator and I am learning so much from him). The 3D software we use here is strictly Lightwave and by the time I graduate I will have a pretty good understanding of the program. I guess my question is, since I have no experience with Maya, would the Fast Track be a good way for me to transition into the VFX field? I will already have a reel and portfolio when i graduate in the spring, just no contacts, experience in the industry or knowledge of Maya. It seems that Gnomon is great at helping their students get work in the field, but does that apply to the fast track students as well, or just the full time Cert. students? Any feedback would be awesome. Sorry for the long post, but this has been bouncing around in my head for awhile now.

maunilpatel
08-10-2006, 04:58 AM
hi all
I am considering going to gnomon
I am sophmore
I am 16 years old and I have started working into maya, just over a year now and I am spending my free time also on working in maya and following some tutorials and tring some stuff on my own to get as much knowledge possible of maya I can before I can attend Gnomon in 2008. I am also taking art class in high school to improve upon my 2d art skills.. I am not rich so don't have much cash so what my question is, is that, can we get student loans of 43,000 dollars for studing at gnomon..? or is there any other way to get all the money for the fees that I have to give at gnomon? I can pay for my living expense but school fee.. I have to manage it through loans.. any help is appericiated..
and another question is.. do you need a computer? Do they require you one? or all the work you do is on their computers?

maunilpatel
08-10-2006, 11:33 PM
no replys? atleast people who went at gnomon please answer it if you can..

XEngineer
08-15-2006, 07:51 PM
1) The school provides Sallie Mae loans. The rate isn't exactly great, but it's something.
2) You can use the computers at school. Labs are open all day past midnight. Unfortunately, those same labs have classes as well. So, sometimes there aren't open labs, and when they are open, the computers might not be the best at the school. Get your own computer.

SanjayChand
08-15-2006, 08:07 PM
Gnomon just opened up a brand new lab with over 20 computers thats usually free at night.

maunilpatel
08-16-2006, 02:12 AM
1) The school provides Sallie Mae loans. The rate isn't exactly great, but it's something.
2) You can use the computers at school. Labs are open all day past midnight. Unfortunately, those same labs have classes as well. So, sometimes there aren't open labs, and when they are open, the computers might not be the best at the school. Get your own computer.

No other loan option other then Sallie Mae loans?

Gnomon just opened up a brand new lab with over 20 computers thats usually free at night.

Thanks for the reply..

abeaguilar
06-30-2007, 01:26 PM
Bump...I think this thread had a great discussion going, and was just what I was looking for. I still have a few questions regarding this school, and I hope someone can clear them up. I've been drawing my whole life, alot of people say I'm really good, but I have no 3d software experience, besides using Flash for over 4 years. Do you think that this will affect me in any way because I hope to start Gnomon this year.

Anim8or06
07-01-2007, 07:56 PM
Originally Posted by Spritemare
jesus...you could get 2 master's degrees for that money.



So I got a 1st class honors degree, got a Masters with distinction in digital media (major animation) and I still got no dam job :sad:. I have applied endlessly to alllllllllllllllllllll places and get rejected from lack of experience

So I thought about Gnomon so much, I dunno what to do, as I wanna be an environment artist but companies are looking for experience.

Is it really worth paying all this money and then not getting a job???!!? :shrug:

mummey
07-02-2007, 02:35 PM
Bump...I think this thread had a great discussion going, and was just what I was looking for. I still have a few questions regarding this school, and I hope someone can clear them up. I've been drawing my whole life, alot of people say I'm really good, but I have no 3d software experience, besides using Flash for over 4 years. Do you think that this will affect me in any way because I hope to start Gnomon this year.

In short, no. They care about your skills as an artist, not your skills in applications. In their view, its their job to teach you the 3D stuff once your admitted.

mummey
07-02-2007, 02:37 PM
So I got a 1st class honors degree, got a Masters with distinction in digital media (major animation) and I still got no dam job :sad:. I have applied endlessly to alllllllllllllllllllll places and get rejected from lack of experience

So I thought about Gnomon so much, I dunno what to do, as I wanna be an environment artist but companies are looking for experience.

Is it really worth paying all this money and then not getting a job???!!? :shrug:

At your point I would put keep putting more time into your demo reel, and find places where you can get it critiqued. The Siggraph conference has places sometimes.

CodeNothing
07-02-2007, 06:53 PM
hmmm.... always an interesting thread subject. schools and jobs.


First of all jobs. In the art industry, People hire you if you do good work at a reasonable price. Thats it. There is no entery level position in the art world that honestly requires 'experience' in the industry. They put a '2 year experience required' tag on the aplication to cut down the massive number of high school kids, and amature submissions. This also helps them to establish weather you are capable of working as a professional, and that you have been able to last at least 2 years in a team without driving everyone around you mad.

If you are an uber-artist, and driven to learn independently, there is no reason you cant get a job right out of high school into any entery level position. This is a one in a million instance, and very few artists have ever accomplished it, and those that dont go to art school, usualy have a much harder time once they are working.

But, If you have a portfolio as good or BETTER than the guys graduating college, and you can present yourself well in an interview, you WILL get a job.

Now school. Back in reality land its a well known fact that 99.9% of the kids who were the best artists in high school suck at the college level. And they are a joke at the professional level. The truth is we all need massive amounts of training to compete in the industry. If you go back and read that underlined sentance real close, you will notice there is no mention of graduation, or degrees. Nor did I mention them in the job section. Because the little known secret in the art world is this: Your diploma doesnt mean anything to your employer.

Well, maybe thats not fair. It may make up 1-2% of your employers decission to hire you. If in the rare instance they get 2 artists of the same skill level, and both present themselves well, the diploma may tip the scale that tiny bit in your favor. But I cant tell you how many people Ive run into, who are completely clueless as to why they dont have a job. They say they paid $40,000 to go to school, graduated, and now dont have a job. And they cant understand why. And notice the info they throw out when they complain about this. The amount of money they 'wasted' on the 'crapy school' that didnt send them directly into the industry, and the 'diploma no one cares about' because its from this stupid school.

No one ever says "I have an amazing portfolio, that looks better than any graduating class, : HERE : and no one will hire me. whats going on?"

Basicaly blame the teachers, blame the school, blame the system, they cheated you out of your money, and it doesnt matter my portfolio doesnt look even close to being professional, I deserve a job because i paid for a diploma.

Harsh reality of art. If schools are guilty of anything its being too soft on people who arent working hard. At ACCD its almost a daily thing in first term to hear a teacher anounce "What the hell are you even doing here??" to a student, and hear them crumple and throw away whatever assignment that student had been working on and be told to start over and do it right or get out. Students who screw around, do their own 'thing', and dont want to learn what the teacher is teaching eventualy drop out, or are dropped. Just like in the real world when your employer will fire you for not following direction. Or, not hire you in the first place.


So when it all comes down to it. Work your butt off to be the best artist in your class. Dont just think that because your getting passing grades your on your way to a job.


As for Gnomon, from what i have heard it is an excelent school. They can be a little tougher to get loans for, but they have excelent teachers, and a good mix of programs there. If you dont have the money for college, spend as much as you can on the Gnomon DVD's, watch them many times, and get involved with online forums (Like this one!) and get critiqe, also get weekly assignments like the sketch group, the mini game art challenge, and partisipate in larger competitions like EON. Having assignments is one of the things school realy has going for it. sitting at home its difficult to get inspired to work, and practice.

whew..... too much typing. Good luck! :thumbsup:

dushagarwal
08-10-2007, 04:35 PM
Hello,

I'm from India, currently studying 3d in Bangalore. I am considering Gnomon for their 2 year certificate program. I have completed my graduation with a degree in Business Management and decided to study 3D soon after. I don't have an art background and neither can I draw too well but I am very keen on specializing in Visual Effects.

I was wondering if it's actually worth spending that much money to go to Gnomon and also how much does living cost there as a Gnomon student. Also, as an international student what would be my job opportunities?

I would be grateful if you could help me out with this.

Thanks

gigahertz6
10-03-2007, 12:06 AM
Best investment I made. Out of all the guys that went through the program with me 6 in all i think. we're all working. We've been working for almost two years now. And as far as I know of the class that fallowed. they have all found employment as well. If you have the cash and you know you won't goof off invest the money. I have no bad things to say about the place. its awesome. Good luck.

does Gnomon require a portfolio? if so, what kind? 2D, 3D, combination?

XraySpex
12-02-2007, 10:50 PM
Sorry for bringing up a thread that seems to have died... Just had a quick question if ya don't mind.

I know that gnomon is a perfect school for me because i don't know EXACTLY what portion of 3D I want to do and it sounds like the certificate program teaches it all. My question is: Once I DO figure out what I want to focus on will I be able to adjust my classes to fit my goals?

To all the people out there that are trying to get into gnomon and worrying about your portfolio... I recommend contacting the school and talking to an adviser. I have been working with a guy named Brian for awhile now and he has seen how hard I have worked the past few months... this got me into the program. I must say that my portfolio is NOT very good but just from working with him and showing him how hard I am willing to work I got in. He is also a cool guy so if he isn't too busy I recommend talking to him.

Thanks!

XraySpex
12-10-2007, 04:36 AM
Im still interesting in getting my other question answered but was also wondering if anyone knows of any scholarships or grants that you can use for Gnomon. Also, is sallie mae the only student loan program that you can use?


Thanks!!
-X

aqua9
12-10-2007, 01:40 PM
Good thread to see .............


wanted this one up again ..........

Astrixx
12-19-2007, 03:15 AM
Just a little curious, but if I just wanted to get into the game field would the gnomon certificate program be good for me? If not can anyone point me in the right direction please.

XraySpex
01-17-2008, 04:39 PM
Well I just wrote a long post but I lost it so I guess I will write again but it won't be as thorough.

I just recently got back from gnomon in hollywood and because no one has posted anything about the school in a long time thought I would write about my experience there.

The school is pretty cool inside. Lots of movie posters and artwork from students and teachers on the walls. The older computer labs are nothing special but the two new ones are pretty awsome. The architecture is pretty neat and they all have some pretty big dell monitors (i think 30''?). There are two student lounges, one old and one new... the old ones doesn't look like anyone uses it anymore but the new ones had traces of students that had recently been in the area. Both lounges have big screen tvs with xbox, playstation, etc, etc.

My major concerns about gnomon is that all of their work on there web page is from 2005 and before as well as all of the work in the brochure (most from 99-04). There is a disc that comes with the brochure that had some recent work on it from 06 and 07... most of it was not very impressive.

I am starting to wonder if Gnomon was a good school at one time but now is lacking the good teachers now or something.... no one has said anything about the school on these forums since 2005 and those were students that had graduated in 2003 I believe.

If there is anyone that has recently graduated from gnomon I am sure many of us would appreciate you speaking up and telling us about your experience there. If you don't mind I think it would be benificial to let us know whether you are working now or looking for a job or whatever.

-X

SanjayChand
01-17-2008, 05:37 PM
Hi there

I graduated in December and within a few weeks I was employed at The Orphanage. You are right, most of the student work on the school website is old, but they did update the gallery at gnomononline.com (http://www.gnomononline.com/pages/gallery/student.php)

Overall id say Gnomon is a great school. I learned quite a bit and I am now working in the industry.

:)

mummey
01-17-2008, 05:43 PM
Xray: do a search on this site for 'Gnomon' and you'll find other threads on the subject as well.

aqua9
01-17-2008, 06:47 PM
Man......... what Xray said was rite..........

no one seems to write much on the school these days.....

Thanx AryaFX for ur reply ...... but yes i know what you will have to say about the school ........ and you have already told me :D

So i also request people who graduated recently or in the school rite now to reply here about their experiences and what ever u feel like about the school..........

XraySpex
01-18-2008, 05:26 AM
aryaFX: Thanks for the post, i really appreciate it. I just checked out your portfolio and recognized your work from the reel that I got from the school. To tell you the truth, the reason why I said "most of it was not very impressive" and didn't say "none of it is any good" is because of your work. There was also one other creature that was good on the student reel that I don't believe was yours. Do you have any other art training other than gnomon? I am just curious. Also, are any of your other class mates also working in the industry that you know of or are you the only one that has got a job so far?


mummey: Actually, it is quite difficult to find anything else related to the gnomon school itself. If you do a search for 'Gnomon' like you suggested just a bunch of stuff about their dvds come up.

I would love to still hear from some other recent students, either attending or recent grads if possible. Thanks guys and gals!

ML76
01-18-2008, 03:29 PM
xraySpex: I graduated from Gnomon last summer. I was picked up as a character modeler on a next-gen game about a week later. As far as I know all 16 people who graduated with me are working and have great jobs too. Gnomon was the best thing I ever did. Seriously.

You have to understand, however, that the Gnomon program isn't set up in a way that is condusive to making beautiful, complete images or illustrations to post on cgtalk or whatever. You will hardly ever get that kind of assignment. It's a generalist program. You take 6 to 7 classes per term. Your hands are FULL. You are way too busy to post on cgtalk anyway.

The point of Gnomon, especially in the first five terms or so, is to teach you to THINK and create and behave like a cg professional. Most students went to art school BEFORE Gnomon. You can specialize in the last couple of terms if you really try.

Also, as with any education, and I've said this a million times, you get out what you put in.


Sanjay: congrats on the new job. :) I was so happy and inspired to see your creatures featured on zbrushcentral. Way to go!


Mary Louise

XEngineer
01-18-2008, 04:44 PM
xraySpex: I graduated from Gnomon last summer. I was picked up as a character modeler on a next-gen game about a week later. Mary Louise

Hey, congrats Mary! I didn't even know you where you were working.

XraySpex
01-18-2008, 05:12 PM
Thanks Mary, that post was quite reassuring. I am wondering though.... when you said "the Gnomon program isn't set up in a way that is condusive to making beautiful, complete images or illustrations to post on cgtalk or whatever" does this mean that it isn't condusive to creating a good demo reel as well? Is that not necessary because of the contacts you make at Gnomon?

JMusto0223
01-18-2008, 05:17 PM
I would think that the gnomon school would be extremely hard to get into as it is a very good school to go to. How hard is the competition to get into gnomon... would taking online courses get you anywhere as far as having a demo reel and getting a job after at all?

Xevious
01-18-2008, 06:34 PM
I wish the DVDs were cheaper.

The Intro to Zbrush 3 DVD is the best value because it's packed with 6 hours of instruction and its cheaper than the other DVDs.

According to the Gnomon website, it is the number 1 selling DVD. Its not hard to figure out why..

XraySpex
01-18-2008, 11:29 PM
I would think that the gnomon school would be extremely hard to get into as it is a very good school to go to. How hard is the competition to get into gnomon... would taking online courses get you anywhere as far as having a demo reel and getting a job after at all?

I am not sure about the online program other than it seems to be more expensive than the school itself which seems strange to me. I was just looking at the online page and it says it is $1650 for "intro to maya" and it is $1250 for the same course at gnomon. Same 10 week course... seems strange to me.

As far as how hard it is to get it, in my opinion it isn't very hard. If you work with someone at the school and show them how hard of a worker you are then you will get it most likely. My work is NOT very good but I think I got accepted just because of showing that I am willing to work hard.

If anyone else could give us some more personal experiences about their time at Gnomon it would really be great.

ML76
01-19-2008, 02:12 PM
Hey Jerry! Thanks! Love the job, it's great! :)


XraySpex: Yes and No. There's alot of different kinds of demo reels, with all different kinds of requirements. So it depends really on what you want to do. Point is, though, that Gnomon's not an illustration school. They're teaching you what you need to get along as a worker in a niche industry. Your reel needs to show that you have a crapload of potential, and that you have skills and knowlege that will allow you to get whatever specific job they're hiring you for done. You're a student, not a pro. I think employers get that, most of the time. You're right, though, that the connections to make at Gnomon, with students, teachers, speakers, staff, board members, recruiters, etc., are absolutely your golden ticket. So the school is invaluable, imo, just for that.


Mary

SanjayChand
01-19-2008, 07:28 PM
XraySpex:

Hey man!

I did go get a BA in studio art before coming to Gnomon. Alot of people who were in my term also had degrees beforehand in various areas (architecture/philosophy/art).

Out of my class (which is around 15-20 people), those who have looked for jobs have found them. Most are still working on thier reels and perfecting them. There is quite a bit of good work coming out of Gnomon, but they do no always show it on the website or pamplets.

Ill agree with Mary and state that the connections you make are worth the price alone, as I landed the job at The Orphanage from a teacher of mine.

The basic theme here is that if you go to Gnomon and work hard, you will get a job. However, I would highly suggest you recieve some traditional art training before hand. They do incorporate it into the curriculum at Gnomon, but enrolling in a few painting, gesture drawing, design, and photography classes before hand at a local community college would definitly help.

Mary:

Thanks for the kind words! I hope you are enjoying your time at Rainbow Studios and maybe ill see you around sometime :)

aqua9
01-19-2008, 07:31 PM
great going guys. ........

any others from the school can report here ....... hehehe just kidding........

actually one of my friend has joined the school this January (Winter 2008 Batch)
and he says its a really good school to go ..........
i think he will reply here soon ........ I didnt tell him about this thread though :D hehehe

Guys keep this thread alive forever this would be a great help to others who r looking for info about Gnomon...........

And also ....... SANJAY....... I forgot to ask about the placements of ur classmates also r they all recruited?????

thanx to Xray for letting me remaind about this question:)

XraySpex
01-30-2008, 04:41 PM
I have two questions that I feel are the reason why I have any doubts in my mind about attending gnomon. If someone could answer them I would really appreciate it.

1. Is it necessary to learn all the different things that gnomon teaches? If I know that I want to be a model/texture artist am I wasting my time by taking all the other classes or is it important to know about all the different areas?
2. Does gnomon teach you more than just how to run the programs?

SanjayChand
01-30-2008, 05:10 PM
1. You should learn everything or atleast most of it. I went into Gnomon wanting to be a creature modeler and came out being a lighter (who likes to creature model). So it could change. You might find out that you reaaaaaaally enjoy rigging or compositing, and if you do, you should pursue it and get it as good at it as possible.

Its always best to figure out what you want to specialize early-on so you can get good at it. However, having knowledge of many areas in CG will make you more valuable to a company.

2. Gnomon is just as focused on the artistic side as the technical side. Its a good mix of both. You are expected to be naturally artistic though. If you arent then you might have a problem.

XraySpex
01-30-2008, 05:32 PM
Thanks arya! You have been a great help, i really appreciate it.

tleisher
01-30-2008, 05:51 PM
Why do you spend 12 hours a day there? Is it just working on the projects? I have a working PC at home with Maya and various other 3d programs on it so I could work from home if need be.

SanjayChand
01-30-2008, 06:07 PM
Its good to spend time at the labs because there are plenty of people around to answer your questions if you have any (and you will have alot). Plus its a good time to get to know people who are going to school with you.

However, not everyone spends all of their time in the labs working. Personally, I started to work more at home as the program progressed, although I wished I had worked in the labs more often.

azshall
02-04-2008, 09:02 PM
Why do you spend 12 hours a day there? Is it just working on the projects? I have a working PC at home with Maya and various other 3d programs on it so I could work from home if need be.

When I was at Gnomon I did a lot of work at home for the first 2 terms or so. However as time goes on getting to know the people in your class and others in the lab is a huge asset, not only for networking but working in that kind of atmosphere with others. You have to remember, that when you get into the studio you're going to need to work as a team and if you don't know how to approach people, ask for help or dive in and maybe help steer things on the right path... Then you're not going to be an asset.

12 Hours is also not uncommon to work on something. I think anybody can agree with me, that works professionally, that there will be times you question even doing this line of work because of crunch time hours. I love this field, the payoff after you've worked very hard on a great project is very rewarding; to see that final piece knowing what it took to get it done.

Seth

Couture
03-10-2008, 06:33 AM
Hey all... I'm considering transfering out of my current college for next fall, and thinking about Gnomon. I was wondering about a few things though...

Does the school have a render farm? If so, how large is it?

The website claims that the school is run on Windows. Are macs used at all in the school?

How many of the computers/labs have Wacom tablets? I use them exclusively, and at my current school I have to carry my own to school to use in some of the labs.

Does the school have any sort of motion capture training? Or even just for working with mocap data?

Finally, is it really hard to get housing in the area? If I go out, I won't have a vehicle. Also, whats the average price of say a 1 bedroom appartment in the area? Is it hard to find other room mates from school?

Thanks :-)

SanjayChand
03-10-2008, 07:12 AM
Does the school have a render farm? If so, how large is it?

nope. people render thier stuff on the computers in the labs after-hours.


The website claims that the school is run on Windows. Are macs used at all in the school?
not really. I think the computer at the front desk is a mac.


How many of the computers/labs have Wacom tablets? I use them exclusively, and at my current school I have to carry my own to school to use in some of the labs.
Im pretty sure that most of the labs have wacom tablets hooked up to each machine.


Does the school have any sort of motion capture training? Or even just for working with mocap data?
not when I was there. But its possible that teachers will bring some stuff in or that they will offer a class in the future on it.

Finally, is it really hard to get housing in the area? If I go out, I won't have a vehicle. Also, whats the average price of say a 1 bedroom appartment in the area? Is it hard to find other room mates from school?
its not hard.

A 1 bedroom can range from $1000 to $1600 easily. Its cheaper to find roomates and get a two bedroom.

aqua9
03-10-2008, 08:21 AM
yeah ........... hope everything would be as good as Sanjay says :D

Couture
03-10-2008, 12:50 PM
Thanks... I'm trying to weigh out the decision of transferring schools since the one I'm currently at I have a large scholarship for, and I need to be sure it will be worth the extra money that I'd be giving up.

If I don't bring a car (which I wouldn't be), is getting around going to be really hard? I live in Philly right now, which like New York, is run on public transit. I've only been to LA once, and it seemed like quite the opposite. Is there a lot of stuff to do nearby on one's free time?

I was also wondering roughly how many of the projects over the course of the study are group-based, compared to single assignments. Do they stress team skills and production group work?

Finally, the big question I always wonder about any school... How good of a representation is there showcased work of the whole student body? A lot of times the average work at schools isn't nearly on par with the work that they show.

Thanks again!

Couture
03-12-2008, 03:22 PM
Anyone? :-)

viciousdjoker
03-12-2008, 03:37 PM
I dont know much about the school. But i can tell you about LA. Yes, there are buses that pick up and drop off. Theres alot of stuff do there. But, if i remember right the school only goes for 1 year i think. So its pretty intensive and you dont have time to do much stuff there except work on homework.

ML76
03-12-2008, 05:20 PM
Public transit in LA is crap. But you'll make lots of friends at Gnomon with cars, so if you're really nice to them or really pathetic looking, you can bum rides pretty easily. In the end though, you won't have time to do anything but work, so I wouldn't waste any more time worrying about wether or not there's fun things to do near the school. All the fun happens AT the school, I promise.

There's not a whole lot of group projects. The matchmove and integration class is a group project. That's the only big one I can remember for classes. They have volunteer projects you can do outside of class that have big groups and small groups. They're cool, but time consuming in addition to your classwork. If you want real production experience, I'd recommend an internship.

Lastly, I actually feel that the average quality of work produced at the school is even better than what the school puts out promotionally. I think this is mostly because the best students don't have time to worry about getting renders out to the admins for promotions. I think they're starting to get better about this, however. As a general rule, they don't like to accept people who don't have alot of potential. The program is very intense, and if you don't have the talent to hack it, you won't survive. So your classmates are generally all going to be pretty f-ing good.

Any more questions?

m

beaker
03-12-2008, 06:03 PM
Public transit in LA is crap.It really depends where you live. If your near the subway line or one of the express busses then it is fine. If your not, your screwed. Also all the busses have bike carriers on them so you can ride your bike to the express line and then catch it from there.

ML76
03-12-2008, 08:24 PM
Yes, but the subway station is quite far from Gnomon. I knew this kid who took the subway from Pasadena and then skateboarded like two miles from the stop to the school. It can be done, but I think it would be alot better to just live really close to the school. You're gonna be there like 16 hours a day anyway.

beaker
03-12-2008, 08:51 PM
Yes, but the subway station is quite far from Gnomon.No it's not. 5 blocks away at the most(hollywood & vine), maybe a 15 minute walk. I used to take it all the time from my place in Redondo Beach to my job in Hollywood. Ride a bike and take it on the subway if 15 minutes is too far away.

http://maps.google.com/maps?daddr=Hollywood%2FVine+Station+%4034.101629,-118.326859&geocode=&dirflg=&saddr=N+Cahuenga+Blvd,+Los+Angeles,+CA,+USA&f=d&sll=34.100478,-118.326745&sspn=0.007818,0.009677&ie=UTF8&ll=34.098888,-118.328193&spn=0.007818,0.009677&z=17

Your friend must have been getting off at the wrong stop, like Universal City.

ML76
03-12-2008, 09:20 PM
Sorry, you're right. I am letting my hatred of Hollywood show. Having to walk more than two blocks in that part of town, where Gnomon is, seems like two miles. And keep in mind that you'll be going home late at night most of the time. If you took a bike it would be safer, I guess. Anyway, if I had no car, I'd just try to live as close to the school as possible.

zetetic
04-18-2008, 07:32 AM
I've begun seriously looking at Gnomon as a follow-up to a BFA in Animation and Visual Effects from SCAD. Something like a finishing school, if you will. While one of my initial concerns, the average quality of student output, has already been covered, I'm wondering if it's possible to create display-worthy pieces with the workload given. Six classes in a ten-week term seems somewhat excessive. I'm already quite sure that I intend to focus on modeling, and though I'd certainly like to polish up my texturing and lighting abilities to properly finish the work, I'm not sure that this schedule would allow for continued study in modeling as well as the other aspects.
So to those who have gone through the program: with the amount of classes one must take in the Certificate program, is advanced study possible, or would it behoove me to look elsewhere?

SanjayChand
04-18-2008, 05:34 PM
You can take classes on an extension basis and pick and choose what you like.

zetetic
04-18-2008, 07:53 PM
True. I still intend to take most of the classes of the certificate program, just substituting a few courses. If I spread it out too much, it would take way too long to complete. So really I guess I'm just asking if you feel there's sufficient time to alot to each subject on that course schedule.

SanjayChand
04-18-2008, 09:50 PM
Well, some of the courses have no homework or are lecture classes. Others are only 5 weeks.

So its pretty well-paced. Youll learn alot.

eggtea
06-07-2008, 08:19 AM
I'll have to pay for any kind of schooling I get through student loans, does gnomon offer any scholerships/awards or will I have to depend on a lump sum loan?

And do you recommend getting your own computer or just rely on the schools computers? And would a desktop or laptop be better? (cheaper productivity vs expensive portability)

Would you recommend a car or public transit? I personally like to sketch people/things on public transit. And with the gas prices these days, I'd have to leave my 78 amc pacer in portland. Although I wouldn't mind getting a loan to convert my car to electric/solar, but would it get stolen/vandalised. it's not much of a problem in portland.

I'm working on a portfolio specific for gnomon this summer for submition this spring, does anyone know the odds/ratio of student apply/acceptance ?

JesseGraffam
06-07-2008, 05:23 PM
And do you recommend getting your own computer or just rely on the schools computers? And would a desktop or laptop be better? (cheaper productivity vs expensive portability)


I do not recommend getting a computer while at school. Use the schools computers. Be in the lab. Meet and help others, and they will help you. My roommate at SCAD had his own comp. We're both in the same 3d program, however he got very little done and was easily side tracked. I went to the lab daily, and for long hours. There were tons of others there just like me and we all helped each other get better. It didn't really feel like work, because there were others to talk to and hang out with while things were rendering, or if we just needed an hour break for dinner. Also these people you're around at the labs, may be a contact for you down the road, and them being familiar with your work and how you work can lead to job opportunities. I'm glad I didn't own a computer in college.

Shocklate
06-07-2008, 10:16 PM
From what I know, they don't offer any scholarships and you would have to get a loan.

My recommendation is to get a desktop. If you are only going to and from school, which is all that I do, you shouldn't need a laptop. Plus the school's computers are pretty good.

If I were you, I would get a car. But i know a few students that bike there, or motorcycle. As for public transit I can't tell you about that since I use my motorcycle/car. Also, I don't think that your 78 Pacer would get stolen/vandalized, unless when it is converted to solar power it looks like it has a Flux Capacitor coming out the back.

I don't know about the ratio of submitting to acceptance, but I think it helps to talk to someone there and they can guide your hand as you get ready to submit. That's what I did and I think it really helped. They know what the committee likes and doesn't like to see so they can help you along the way.

Hope this helps.

Cala
06-10-2008, 07:05 PM
I'll be at Gnomon very soon...starting the cert program this Summer (whether the massive loan goes through or not - anyone else having troubles with that right now?...economy sucks)

Anyway, I just wanted to say hi to some fellow Gnomon soon-to-be students & current students. Making the decision to come to Gnomon has been very difficult. It was rather sudden. I had never even heard of the school until a friend clued me in to their DVDs a couple months ago when I was trying to learn Maya. I saw that they offered a certificate program and figured this was the best chance for me to get the most experience in the shortest amount of time. I decided to apply so I built up my portfolio (even took a week off from work to get it done) and sent it in. In the meantime I was already accepted to Animation Mentor. I am finishing up the Maya Springboard Workshop with AM now...and am really loving it. I'm a little sorry to leave the program but am hoping that Gnomon lives up to my expectations. I admit my focus before pursuing Gnomon was and still is character animation so I have my own hesitations because I have been told Gnomon is weak in this area (feel free to dispute if you disagree - I would be really happy to hear otherwise). However, I'm interested in all areas of CG and have always been one to get my hands dirty in everything. I'm concerned that I won't make it if I don't specialize and know that Gnomon is a generalist school. And of course...paying the loans back is flat out scary. So that's where I'm at. Despite all the fears and lack of funds at the moment, I'm still getting on a plane next week. I'll see you there.

SanjayChand
06-10-2008, 07:32 PM
Gnomom Certificate Program is generalist but they do have character animation 1 and 2, and sometimes they offer 3. So thats 3 different 10-week courses plus the "animation and visual effects" course. Plus they have a few 2D character animation courses. Id call someone at the school to verify all of that though.

Cala
06-10-2008, 07:48 PM
That is promising Sanjay, thank you! BTW, saw your ZBrush work recently and the comments from Alex. Very cool stuff and makes me happy to know I'll be in classes with students that are pushing limits like that.

ML76
06-11-2008, 07:35 PM
Hi Brooke. I went to Gnomon too. I think it's a great choice for pretty much anybody interested in all the different areas of cg and vfx. It's true that you come out of it with A LOT of generalist skills, but I think that's okay. You can "make it" as a generalist. I have lots of friends who are doing just that. If you're talented and work really hard in one area, you can also make it as a specialist. There are probably better places to study if you just want to be a character animator, but I have friends from the Gnomon cert program who are doing just fine in that area as well.

My best advice going in is to keep an open mind, take a little time to figure out what you like and what you're good at. When I started I wanted to do lighting/compositing, and I came out as a character modeler, so you just never know. Anyway, it's all good, so don't worry.

SanjayChand
06-11-2008, 09:32 PM
That is promising Sanjay, thank you! BTW, saw your ZBrush work recently and the comments from Alex. Very cool stuff and makes me happy to know I'll be in classes with students that are pushing limits like that.

No problem!
:D

Imhotep397
06-12-2008, 03:57 AM
So would you say its worth packing up my bags and moving there even though I am not in the Certificate program? It doesnt seem workthwile thats all without some kind of track. That is one of the reasons why I was interested in the program because of the structure and and rell rounded curriculum.

I don't know about just packing up and moving out there as taking separate courses puts you in a position where there may or may not be spots available for you from semester to semester. Can you really afford to be out there for a couple of years where sometimes you'll get the classes you need and sometimes you won't?

Honestly, if you don't have some eye catching concepts that would translate well to 3D in a portfolio I would imagine the Gnomon people would find it difficult to admit you. Maybe if you applied like 5 or 6 years ago when 3D was still new in academic circles, but now all of the better programs really do have their pick of the bests artists. I wouldn't say don't apply, but if whatever 2D stuff you can produce doesn't look cool you have some work to do before applying. I think the other thing to consider is to look at a number of programs other than Gnomon and because you have no art in your background whatsoever you may want to or have to start at the undergrad. level just so that you aren't in classes with people that are seemingly running circles around you, which would be even more discouraging than having someone tell you to build your traditional art skill, before even attempting to try.

trence5
06-21-2008, 04:43 PM
I have a dvd talking about their school and it seems like great place to attend. I see some your posts talking about 'generalists' and animation, but do they have some programs that will focus more on modeling? Oh sorry about that tangent but what I really want to ask is how much is their tuition for their programs?



thank you

mummey
06-22-2008, 12:05 AM
I have a dvd talking about their school and it seems like great place to attend. I see some your posts talking about 'generalists' and animation, but do they have some programs that will focus more on modeling? Oh sorry about that tangent but what I really want to ask is how much is their tuition for their programs?



thank you

The certificate program is "pick your poison" so to speak. They cram as much knowledge as they can into you in 21 months. You are given some elective options, but don't expect to be able to do modeling, and nothing else.

mhinge
07-25-2008, 12:42 AM
I've read through this thread and found some very valuable information, but there's one area about Gnomon with which I'm still having difficulty - the portfolio. I have a degree in computer programming, but have always had a passion for art, traditional drawing and such. I've taken some courses, but mostly I have just done it on my own. I keep coming back to Gnomon and am hoping to successfully apply.

I feel like I can't find a frame of reference for the level of the portfolio for admitted students. I don't really know if my work is in the ballpark for admittance, if it would need some work, or a lot of work. Unfortunately I had a bunch of artwork destroyed by flood damage, so I'm rebuilding - and since I'm rebuilding, I would like to know what I could focus on for a successful portfolio.

Any advice on websites at which I could look, people I could contact, etc. would be greatly appreciated.

EJ
07-25-2008, 04:49 AM
mhinge, I've copy and pasted some info from the Gnomon Application form (http://www.gnomonschool.com/forms/Gnomon_CG_Domestic.pdf) that may be of interest.

MANY TRADITIONAL ARENAS FEED INTO 3D, THUS, THERE ARE NO SET STYLE REQUIREMENTS FOR A PORTFOLIO. STUDENTS SHOULD SUBMIT BETWEEN 15 AND 20 PIECES. PLEASE INCLUDE PIECES THAT YOU FEEL DEMONSTRATE YOUR STRONGEST WORK, AND REFLECT YOUR ABILITIES AND PERSONAL INTERESTS. SKETCHBOOKS, FIGURE STUDIES AND CONCEPT WORK ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED AS WE ARE LOOKING TO SEE YOUR SKILL, CREATIVITY, AND HOW YOU PROGRESS FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION. YOU NEED NOT SUBMIT FOUNDATIONAL EXERCISES, SUCH AS COLOR WHEELS AND GRAY SCALES.

Hope this helps.

mhinge
07-25-2008, 05:50 PM
Thank you for the response. I have seen that description previously, I've read through quite a bit of Gnomon's website. I've also tried some general searches on the Internet. I guess ultimately I'm trying to figure out if my work is of the caliber to have a chance to be accepted, as I'd like my first impression to be a strong one. But perhaps there is no good way to check that, as I imagine the portfolios they receive are quite varied. What would be wonderful is to see examples of successful and unsuccessful portfolios, but I'm fairly positive that's not feasible.

Biklar
01-10-2009, 10:41 PM
Haven't seen a post on here for awhile so I thought I'd update it by asking some questions.

I will be taking two analog classes at Gnomon starting next week. I am a self-taught but professional illustrator but a trained graphic designer/digital designer. I've done a lot of work in creating assets for games and virtual worlds which includes backgrounds and static character designs.

What I would like to do is strengthen my skills in illustration so that I am much better in drawing overall especially in the areas of character design and perspective. I figure the nuts and bolts of becoming a good animator is to possess a stronger drawing skill set and really undertand and be able to visualize anatomy in movement and still pose very well. These are areas where I am weaker.

I am going to take all of Gnomon's analog classes in hopes of seeing (given that I will be working hard) a great improvement with my illustration skills.

Has anyone else taken a lot of their analog courses? How were they and what did you think?

How would you rate the experience overall?

I decided to take traditional drawing classes at Gnomon because I figure the classes are set up to train illustrators specifically with CG field aspirations in mind, whereas some art classes at a community class would be very generalized and might not offer techniques or training that prepare artists to go into animation.

I have taken a couple of art classes in the past...they were beginning. I don't remember at all learning about the mechanics of perspective. It was just going in, sitting and drawing shapes on a table. I know this helps drawing to a degree because it sharpens the eye, but I do think that some mechanics should be taught directly by an instructor on perspective which is the most important thing to learn at first, and I get the impression that at Gnomon, this is what might be highlighted on in a more structured and guiding manner.

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