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milqman
01-08-2005, 06:42 PM
I am facing a tough decision. I recently sold my copy of Lightwave 7.5 (Academic) to buy Cinema4D R9 (a number of reasons influenced this decision, namely, I didn't see very much innovation or a competetive spirit in the application/company anymore) However, after mulling things over for a while, I started to wonder if maybe I should get a 6x8 Intuos3 and improve on some 2d illustration/painting skills first. And here is my decision. I can't decide whether to continue improving my skills as a 3d artist or if perhaps it would be a better idea to develop more traditional art skills and delve a little into illustration/vector art, etc.

I'm having a heck of a time with this decision. I'm feeling a little overwhelmed with all the options available to pursue.

Any advice, insight, input, suggestions, etc are most welcome!

policarpo
01-08-2005, 06:53 PM
For what it is worth, here is my story. I started out as a traditional pen and paper and paint and canvas artist and then took on to using digital tools. While my digital work was still 2D it was based on Vector, Photo and Painting techniques which I translated over to my digital work. Over time I wanted new challenges as an artist and 3D looked like the right thing to evolve to (since I stopped painting and drawing). I've been at 3D for a while, and it now feels like an extension of my work. I no longer see things as 2D or 3D, it's just digital artwork.

I know it can seem overwhelming @ times, but I think 3D is here to stay as a visual medium and it will only get better over time. But, with that said, I still firmly believe that any 3D artist worth their salt should still have a solid foundation in the 2D world (photography, drawing, vector, etc) because this will only improve their 3D work.

I would suggest that you get your Wacom tablet and just re-energize yourself by doing some 2D work. When it feels right to incorporate your 3D into your work, you will know it. And the cool thing is, it will feel like an added dimension of your skill set that you can use whenever it seems appropriate.

In the end, all that matters is that it is good art. Who cares if it's 3D, 2D, 4D or no-dee.

Cheers!

bobzilla
01-08-2005, 07:41 PM
What's wrong with the old pad and pencil? Can't get more traditional than that! You don't need a Wacom pad for that.

I came from a traditional bg also, but I never really continued that into the computer world (kinda got stuck in the Holy Trinity of graphics apps: Quark, Illustrator, Photoshop) and never really drew or painted, per se, in Illustrator or Photoshop. I also never got used to using the Wacom Pad and pen. I use it occasionally for paining textures, though.

My 2 ¢...

JamesMK
01-08-2005, 08:05 PM
---I still firmly believe that any 3D artist worth their salt should still have a solid foundation in the 2D world (photography, drawing, vector, etc) because this will only improve their 3D work.---
Quoted simply because it makes so much sense it's almost ridiculous :thumbsup:

milqman
01-08-2005, 08:57 PM
Part of me is a little afraid, I suppose, that I'll invest a bit of money in either, whether by software, hardware, education, books, etc, and discover I never really had any innate artistic talent to begin with.

I appreciate all the feedback! This community is one of the most helpful I've ever come across.

Mike Abbott
01-08-2005, 09:24 PM
Being able to draw (particularly 'realism') is always a good foundation IMO. Getting to grips with drawing can only improve your visual perception - skills that will aid you in any artwork - 2D or 3D.

If you are new to drawing that last thing I would do is get a Wacom (for that purpose). As Bobzilla suggests, make friends with a 2B pencil and a sketchpad ;) and put aside a set time each day to work on it.

I don't see any need to drop your 3D work, couldn't you do both in parallel?

Mike Abbott

AdamT
01-08-2005, 11:02 PM
I've seen plenty of arguments on both sides (must have drawing skills). I agree it can't hurt and probably helps, but there are plenty of top-notch 3d artists who can't draw worth beans. I would draw my own conclusions but I'm not much good with a pencil. :)

Cactus Dan
01-08-2005, 11:10 PM
Howdy,

Well, if you look at it from a different perspective; from an economic point of view. If it's cheaper to use a pad and pencil, then maybe it would be a good idea to put the money toward whatever it is that you can't do with a pad an pencil (ie. 3d).

If you buy something that allows you to do on the computer what you can just as easily do with a pad and pencil, and therefore are not able to buy the thing that you can't do with a pad and pencil, then it might have been a waste of money.

Just a thought.

Adios,
Cactus Dan

Cartesius
01-09-2005, 08:59 AM
I can't draw at all but I get along pretty good with 3D.

/Anders

bonsaichef
01-09-2005, 03:19 PM
most traditional techniques are far less expensive than computer graphics, and as other already said, there is absolutly no need for a Wacom if you want to learn drawing.

you dont have to do one thing or the other. continue working in 3D, and, if you feel the need to improve your skills and to draw inspiration from other media, try different things and have fun while learning.

over the years i have done drawing, painting, sculpting, photography, printing, metalwork etc
some techniques and materials suited me better than others, but i did learn a lot from every new medium.

attending live drawing classes is often advised. but i think photography and sculpting are also good choices if you want to improve your 3d work. maybe even dance if you are into animation (havent tried that myself, so its more a guess than an advise)

Cactus Dan
01-09-2005, 03:27 PM
Howdy,

I can't draw at all but I get along pretty good with 3D.

/Anders

Pretty good? You're too modest! :D

Adios,
Cactus Dan

RorrKonn
01-09-2005, 03:51 PM
I got Basic C4D 9 and BP2 so I can 3D and 2D :)
got zBrsuh it's neither and both 2D,3D.
got a tablet but I just don't like them, I paint with a mouse.

3D is made up of a lot of deferent parts.
modeling, mapping, texturing, rendering, lighting etc etc.
I like playing with all of them including texturing.
do what u like to do.

RorrKonn
rorrkonn@atomic-3d.com (rorrkonn@atomic-3d.com)
http://www.atomic-3d.com (http://www.atomic-3d.com)
TS6.6 SP2,LW7.5c,Basic C4D 9 + BP2.
zBrush 2,Poser 5...+ Anything else I can afford.

What humans fear the most...Freedom

Art2
01-09-2005, 04:12 PM
Part of me is a little afraid, I suppose, that I'll invest a bit of money in either, whether by software, hardware, education, books, etc, and discover I never really had any innate artistic talent to begin with.

I appreciate all the feedback! This community is one of the most helpful I've ever come across.

You don't have to be like Rembrandt. Picking up a pencil and sketchbook can do you no harm. And I think skulpting has the same effect.
It's about learning the fundamental basics of (things in) life. Simple things like how objects in your scene relate to eachother (whether in size, color etc).
By drawing you learn to think about these things, you watch things differently.
And there are some people who don't have to put in all this effort. They can create scenes in 3D right away that look coherent and right.

Don't be afraid mate, just do it (come and join the Daily sketch Forum! ;) ) !

(hope I came across properly :) )

Newstream
01-09-2005, 06:16 PM
Having spent time in ArtSchool or having a natural talent for drawing or sculpture is never wrong. But these skills don’t go far unless you have the humour and creativity to breath life into these gifts. In fact there are numerous examples of animation / drawing that are really quite mediocre but still shine due to the artist’s unique ability to make the most out of what little talent he or she has by adding humour, bad language or a good story. Just look at SouthPark or Bevis and Butt-head; Brilliant drawing? Hardly. But why do so many people love them? Remember, we all have our humble beginnings, and we all have to start somewhere. The main thing is that you do start! You can go far with what you have if you can combine this with maybe some of your other hidden talents? story telling / humour / compassion etc. ?


I also have an Intuos 3 which I only use when working in Zbrush. I make detailed head sculptures / characters (just like everyone else is doing!) No matter how good or detailed I make them, they still end up being just another head in the crowd! What I’m trying to say is that it’s not necessarily the amount of tools or talent you have that make you stand out, it’s how differently you apply them from everyone else.


You’ll find when surfing various galleries on the web that many artists (no matter how talented) often choose to present their modelling skills by displaying classic tutorial stuff like: mobile phones, cars, wheel rims, barbells etc. Beautifully modelled, no doubt, and textured to perfection! These objects are great to learn and practice on but the question is if they “portray the artist” as being unique?


So….! What then is unique? I dunno…my guess is a good as yours but for the sake of example let’s pick something completely nuts, something ultra-weird like North Korean propaganda karaoke.


http://www.korea-dpr.com/users/norway/events/kfahymn.swf (http://www.korea-dpr.com/users/norway/events/kfahymn.swf)


…and model a series of images / animations with this as inspiration, If you can pull this off, you’ll probably end up with more hits on your homepage than even the most talented 3D-guru who sticks to modelling “safe” objects like mobile phones.


Basically, its all up to you, just make sure you have fun while you're at it!
(PS: no offence intended to anyone) :)
Alex

milqman
01-13-2005, 04:34 AM
Well, many thanks guys! I've decided on Cinema4D. At the moment, I have a rather large project to do with Adobe Illustrator (writing and illustrating a picture book for school) so I have little time to work on 3D. However, when my schedule clears up, I'm pretty sure I'm gonna go ahead and purchase Cinema4D! I plan on improving my drawing skills using good 'ol pencil and paper :D.

Thanks for the advice! It was very very helpful.

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