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resurepus
01-01-2005, 08:35 PM
Researchers at Stanford have demonstrated multi-thousand frame-per-second (fps) video (http://graphics.stanford.edu/papers/highspeedarray/) using a dense array of cheap 30fps CMOS image sensors. A benefit of using a camera array to capture high speed video is that we can scale to higher speeds by simply adding more cameras. Even at extremely high frame rates, our array architecture supports continuous streaming to disk from all of the cameras. Now we know where to use 100TB tape drives and what to expect in the next sci-fi movie."

t-toe
01-01-2005, 08:57 PM
hmmm... I'm curious as to how they "corrected" that footage. it's obvious the cameras were placed in a similar, but definitely different location for each frame, and the perspective shifts all over the place... so, how did they fix the perspective shifts?

resurepus
01-01-2005, 09:03 PM
hmmm... I'm curious as to how they "corrected" that footage. it's obvious the cameras were placed in a similar, but definitely different location for each frame, and the perspective shifts all over the place... so, how did they fix the perspective shifts?If I only knew I would be at Stanford too :)

NrgJake
01-01-2005, 09:04 PM
can the human brain even interpret every frame in a 1000 frames persecond video? seems like a waste... I guess it's interesting tho...

azazel
01-01-2005, 09:43 PM
There are uses for high speed video, one of the most common would be shooting explosions. Most of the time, when you see an explosion in a movie it's filmed at high speed and then played at 2d fps.

powerwave3d
01-01-2005, 10:09 PM
There's a camera that will do 10,000 fps, Cine SpeedCam, it's like $150k without any lens.

Advertising uses high speed cams a lot. All those beer commercials where it shows the beer being poured into the glass and it's all neat looking, a lot of that is shot at 1,000 -4,000 fps. Hair commercials when the lady fluffs up her hair and it looks so nice as it falls down.., etc, etc.

ndog
01-01-2005, 10:39 PM
There was some research using high-speed video to record bullets in flight and then calculate the shooters position. The sample videos showing bullets in flight was pretty amazing.

Pin_pal
01-02-2005, 09:35 AM
I think the guinness book of world records states the fastest camera can capture over 100,000 frames/sec using prisms. I remember reading that in 1983. I'm sure it was much more expensive though :)

halo
01-02-2005, 11:22 AM
you should check out Harold E. Edgerton's work if your into high speed image capture...
i think he was well beyond the 1 millionth/sec in the 40's

here's his image of an atom bomb a fraction of a second after detonation

http://www.cmp.ucr.edu/exhibitions/edgerton/atomic_bomb.JPG

more here

http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Bomb.html

zappenduster
01-02-2005, 08:22 PM
you should check out Harold E. Edgerton's work if your into high speed image capture...
i think he was well beyond the 1 millionth/sec in the 40's

here's his image of an atom bomb a fraction of a second after detonation

more here

http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Bomb.html

this is more about triggering the photograph at the right moment then a highspeed recording maybe he could take a picture of 1/million sec but he cant do a steady sequential recording
like its needed for a movie

Andyman
01-03-2005, 01:14 PM
Maybe they didn't fix the perspective. I don't know, but maybe they positioned them well so that... when the frames go by so fast, your mind only sees certain ones and you can't tell?

balistic
01-03-2005, 04:13 PM
This page has explosion videos shot at 1,000,000 frames per second (http://www.hitech.com.sg/cordin/images.html).

Neat stuff.

edit: Check out the grenade (http://www.hitech.com.sg/cordin/imgrenade.html).

halo
01-03-2005, 10:00 PM
great site...

what a great job "lets blow shit up and film it in slo mo" :bounce: ;)

harlan_hill
01-03-2005, 11:40 PM
Anyone else notice that the "pin" was still in the grenade when it popped? :)

ndog
01-04-2005, 12:25 AM
My guess is that it was electronically detonated, not only for safety reasons but for timing purposes.

Can you imagine the lab assistant, pulling the pin and then fumbling the grenade as he's trying to set it up.

halo
01-04-2005, 12:41 AM
can you go back and turn it the right way around please...ta :)

fonica
01-04-2005, 06:30 AM
you guys are way behind the times.


8 million FPS, 4 CCD SVGA :

http://www.mctcameras.com/uhs.htm
used for crash-sleds where scientists collide metals at high speeds out in the desert.

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