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gothicslavechild
12-31-2004, 04:39 AM
Ok heres the 411. I have been working on my reel for the last 9+ months and have had what you might, and I would deffinately call a rough start. After finishing school, I moved from Utah to the UK and in the process succeded in frying my computer. Lost all of my school work. I spent 3 months getting my computer up and running. This was made excedingly difficult due to the lack of money and fact that I am in a foriegn country. Anyway I eventualy got it working but still had nothing to show in order to find work. nine+ months later I'm still trying to put together a reel. Im finding 2 very deffinate problems. (1) Depression, it's all a bit overwhelming to be 5,000 miles from home with what sometimes looks like no hope of even finding work. (2) This one may be more relevent to the moment. I have all of my character models and props, all textured, rigged and ready to go into what I hope will be a fairly nice reel. I've set up and animated the first minut which mostly contains the walk cycle of 1 character. Ive got 3 more characters to introduce as well as quite a few props and special effects to show off. I'm probably less that a month from completion but I seem to have writers block. I just can't make myself go up there and work. Its turned into an hour a day if Im lucky. Im hoping it's just the Christmas holidays slowing me down but I realy don't think thats it. What I'm asking for are tips hints or anything that might help me stay motivated. I'm becoming very bored (could this be the problem) With a long project what might be done to keep up moral?
While I'm here do you know any sites I might visit for tutorials on animation? I know the basics can do a walk cycle and all of that. Played a bit with IK but am realy just starting out and could use your help. I felt pretty confident untill I started animating then it hit me

!doink!
"I've never done this before."

Class after class titled "3d computer animation" and we never even did a walk cycle? whats the deal? Mostly we just modeled and textured. The animation was limited to paths and how to operate video post as well way too many bouncing balls.

summary:
How do you stay motivated over a long project?
Where can I find good information and tutorials on animation?
Anything else that might help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you

Gothicslavechild

tibes
01-01-2005, 12:15 AM
In terms of animation advice, the best advice is to just animate. Animation is one of those areas, where you can read all the theory and tutorials under the sun, but not learn anything until you actually DO it. That said, you should definately pick up a copy of "The Animator's Survival Kit" if you haven't already.

Your motivation problems might be because you haven't broken down the tasks you have to do sufficiently. If you break any project down into small enough pieces, then each piece doesn't look so daunting. If you're having trouble just with animation, then I'd suggest putting the project to one side for a week and just animating the characters doing different basic exercises. This will make you feel more comfortable with the tools, and improve your animation skills to boot.

I had the same issue when I was starting on Bernerd and Mac (see my sig), somedays only getting one or two hours of actual work done. The thing that really got me through it, was realising that I might fail. Usually the reason for this sort of thing isn't motivation, but fear of failure and once I accepted that what I did might (and probably would) suck at the first attempt, then I was able to work.

Hope that helps you in some way :D

bov
01-01-2005, 10:17 AM
If your not aware of it the '10 Second Club' competition is a good motivator. Each month you get a 10 second sound clip (usually from a movie) and you have to animate a character to the sound. It's a lot of fun and you get a lot of feedback along the way (the January sound clip has just been uploaded).

http://10secondclub.net/

gothicslavechild
01-01-2005, 10:02 PM
In terms of animation advice, the best advice is to just animate. Animation is one of those areas, where you can read all the theory and tutorials under the sun, but not learn anything until you actually DO it. That said, you should definately pick up a copy of "The Animator's Survival Kit" if you haven't already.

Hope that helps you in some way :DThanks for the advice. I'm downloading your animation now. We seem to be pretty close to the same place. I found it funny that your post mentioned doing nothing more than a simple bouncing ball before you started this animation. Same as me, ha ha! Whats up with that:shrug:
As suggested, I'm thinking of joining the 10 second club. Hopefully that will help.
Once again thanks for the help :) Its good to know I'm not the only one who's had this problem.
Oh and I'm taking up the other bit of advice as well. I break things down when I'm modeling or texturing so I guess it just makes sense to have a break down of animation as well.

resurepus
01-02-2005, 04:56 PM
why bother? anyways you are not going to be as good as many animators out there.

eks
01-02-2005, 05:15 PM
i donīt want to sound bitter but... have you ever thought of building up a "modeling and texturing" reel, instead of a "modeling, texturing and animation" reel?

if you master all 3 areas, go for it. but with what you said in your post, it seems you are starting with animation just now, and it takes time to master any one of the 3 areas (and you have lighting and rendering you not even mentioned). so why not finish a reel with modeling and texturing, send it, and while you wait for answers start working on animation.

as for the boredom... i do have the same problem... in my case, working alone until i get another job is the killer. i work much better in a team than alone.

i agree with tibes, break your work in pieaces. and i would add: RENDER IT. see the result of this piece you just finish. admire your own work. if you keep staring at wireframes after wireframes you donīt get a feeling that you have "finished stuff".



eks

gothicslavechild
01-02-2005, 08:35 PM
why bother? anyways you are not going to be as good as many animators out there.hmm? constructive thanks for the advice?

Ric535
01-02-2005, 08:45 PM
why bother? anyways you are not going to be as good as many animators out there.
Jesus Christ Almighty! - what was the point of that post!!!

it all comes down to your outlook - if you believe this (nonsense above) then it will be true, on the other hand if you have a positive outlook you will be able to achieve so much more

gothicslavechild
01-02-2005, 08:55 PM
eks-
Thank you for the constructive criticism:thumbsup:
I've set up fairly complex scenes for the animations. I'd like to show them off. I'm pretty good at lighting and rendering. My only real fault is animation and maybe framing. Ofcourse I could be better at all things but I do think my stuffs pretty decent. When I was looking at jobs they usualy want you to be able to do "some" animation. That's why I want to include it.
So I guess the question is "is it better to have decent models with less than average animation or models not animated at all?" Would just 3d rotations be better? Would 4 character models, 2 buildings and a couple of props be interesting enough to get me work?
I think I'll go ahead and try to animate it, if it doesn't work out I can always go back and do it without.
I'm staying up all night tonight to do some animation.

SamChen
01-02-2005, 10:07 PM
As in a previous post, I'd encourage you to focus on 1 area and master it. You'll have better luck getting hired by a studio.. if that's your goal. Any one of the areas (modeling, texturing, animation) can take a small lifetime to master. Better to do one of these well than all mediocre well.

To fight your boredom, what works for me is to reward yourself everyday.. or every few days. How? ...it's to do final renders of a scene you've set up.. or a character you just modeled, or textured... or even animated if you have the renderfarm. That kinda glimpse into how the film will end up looking is such a motivator for me. It feeds on itself and gets me wanting to finish what I'm working on and move on to the next stage of the pipeline. Try it.

Another thing that kept me motivated throughout the grueling 3 years of production for my own short film was curiosity. I was so curious how the film would turn out and whether I could pull it off. That was enough to fuel my fire.

g'luck! :thumbsup:

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