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RobertoOrtiz
12-25-2004, 02:45 PM
What directors are know for being their own cinematographers?
-R

Lunatique
12-26-2004, 03:36 AM
Rodriguez.

Bonedaddy
12-26-2004, 05:56 AM
Hitchcock. He didn't manipulate the camera directly, but damn if he didn't plan out its every slight movement.

Beyond that and R.R., can't think of any. Would think the ASC would have something to say about that. Probably smaller film directors like Shane Carruth and early Soderbergh did/do more hands-on camerawork.

Lunatique
12-26-2004, 06:19 AM
I think Kubrick was pretty involved as well, and sometimes shot scenes himself. For example, on Eyes Wide Shut, he shooed all the crew off the set and shot the lovemaking scenes of Nicole and Tom by himself.

Directors are typically not allowed to man the camera, as there are rules against that in the film industry. Same thing with editing.

shelby
12-27-2004, 10:17 PM
Soderbergh was the cinematographer on several of his films (Traffic, Oceans Eleven, Oceans Twelve, Solaris, etc.). He uses the psuedonym, Peter Andrews.

tibes
01-03-2005, 10:55 PM
Peter Jackson shot all of Bad Taste himself, he even built his own camera crane and steady-cam rig out of aliminium and steel.

SamChen
01-04-2005, 05:53 AM
Also James Cameron shot parts of Titanic. There are picture of him handholding a Panavision in the steerage scenes in the MakingOf book. Soderbergh is another obvious one. Lots of indie filmmakers shoot themselves too.. out of necessity.

I wonder how many feature CG directors set up their own shots? ....or how hands on they are in the cinematography department?

tibes
01-04-2005, 06:29 AM
You can see on the Fellowship of the Ring Extended Edition DVD, the mo-cap guys rigged up a broomstick with markers as a CG-steadycam so that Peter Jackson could put on a VR headset and run around the scene putting shots together in real-time using the mo-cap software and the animatic animation. Nifty stuff.

It's a wonder this isn't done for all-CG features, it would add a fast natural realism to hand-held and steadicam shots. I guess the way the process works it would be prohibitive in many ways.

I guess it also goes back to the mo-cap vs. keyframe debate, after all keyframed handheld shots are used and look just fine.

timothyc
01-04-2005, 07:43 AM
Among the big studio pics Peter Hyams stands out as one of the few Directors that also serves as his own Director of Photography. Most of the other "hyphenates" only operate the camera and don't do lighting as well. Some big name Directors like to operate on select scenes, such as Ridley Scott, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, David Fincher but this is less common with younger Directors who have grown up with elaborate video monitoring where they can see exactly what the framing is.

I also think it's more common in the British system where the unions aren't as powerful, and they have a tradition of "Lighting Directors" rather than DoP's. In their system the Lighting Director is responsible for lighting only, and the Director communicates more closely with the camera operator in blocking and staging, so it's more natural for him to take over the Operator's duties if he is autocratic enough. Kubrick fell into this category, and Ridley Scott has gone back to doing more of his own Operating now that he has more power. He used to receive a lot of flack from producers, actors and others who felt that the mechanics of operating the camera, panning smoothly and hitting his marks, watching the corners of the frame, checking focus, looking out for microphone booms in shot etc, meant that he wasn't concentrating on the actors performance.

TC

<<GhosTS>>
01-24-2005, 04:38 AM
Only a handfull of directors are cinematographers..
1.Rodriguez.
2.Chris Nolan.
3.Soderburgh.
4.Peter Jackson.(On his early films)

But many good directors do act as DOP s when doing their dream shots(Shots they love)..

Like Hitchcock, David fincher, Ridley scott & many more..

jmBoekestein
02-16-2005, 12:08 AM
I don't know about you guys in america or otherwheres. But in my class all the directors, or nearly all of them are interested in the camera work. I think that most directors of photography are busy with the lighting and continuity and usability of the footage. Cameraman is a second to that and serves what the director wants, the director usually writes up a scene plan called decoupage in french. This plan maps out all the angles the director wants, and he plans it together with his crew usually because they have the knowhow for crane shots and so on. But very often the director will look through the lens to see what he'll end up with, he's after all the storyteller. Camera always involves other people on larger productions, you have a focuspuller, loader/clapper, camera operator, grip, gaffer, you name it! Good luck figuring this one out.

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