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kamsvag
12-15-2004, 08:09 AM
Hi!

I just wanna share two documents I use myself for the creation of my own CG film (oriented to entertain children).

First we got the storyboard sheet. Download here. (http://home.tiscali.se/132438/ghostkids/Storyboards/StoryboardSheets.pdf)
This one is pretty much standard sheets. Not much to say about 'em.

Second we got the shotplanning sheet. Download here. (http://home.tiscali.se/132438/ghostkids/Storyboards/ShotPlan.pdf)
This one is based from what a mentor of mine during my time at VFS told me to use. You should use one for each shot in the film. The sheet is used to keep track of what's in the scene, what happens in the scene, and also where you are in the production of the scene.
This sheet I've desgined for the process I self go through when creating a scene, so you might just wanna look at it and create something that fits you, not everyone works the same way...

Hope this helps someone.

Cheers!

mahir
12-15-2004, 08:19 AM
Hey thanks a lot for the templates.
I'm curious how the shotplanning sheet is typically used. Could you post an actual production sample perhaps? It looks like there's a lot of information you can put in. And is this for each shot of your production? Wouldn't that mean a whole lot of sheets? Or am I confusing shots with the drawn panels of a storyboard?

kamsvag
12-15-2004, 08:42 AM
My scanner has broken so I can't scan anything, though I can write a short description of how I use the sheet. And yes, there will be plenty of sheets, but not one for each panel, just one for each shot.

Scene:
This one is simply a naming space. I name my scenes as chapters and scenes, so it wont be a mess to insert a scene somewhere. Example, Graduation:11
So let's say some scene needs to be inserted between Graduation:11 and Graduation:12 I simply call it Graduation:11.5, it leaves me "adresses" for scenes before and after that inserted new scene.

Shot Description:
Here I describe briefly what is going to happen in this shot. Example, George trips on his robes and falls forward.

Framing:
This should be pretty much a copy of the storyboard pan. If there's several pans in the storyboard, simply select one that suits to describe the scene.

Set:
I write down a list of what need to be in the set for this shot.

Characters:
I write down a list of wich character need to be in the shot.

Shot plan:
I draw a simple image describing how I plan my shot, camera movement and placement, usualy a top down perspective works well for this.

Lighting/Fx:
A short description of any special FX or lighting effects neccesary for the shot.

Notes:
Simply a space to add notes to the scene that doesn't fit in the other boxes.

Production Process:
Here I keep track of what's finnished and what to do later. Since I'm an animator I've fleshed out my animation process in this window. My guess would be that this window would look a bit diffrently for someone who has a focus on rendering/lighting or what ever.



Did this help at all?

mahir
12-15-2004, 09:24 AM
Wow instant reply! :)
And yes that did help to explain what goes into the shotplan.

Just a few more queries:
Do you indicate your camera moves in the shot plan? Does this include cuts within the same scene (i.e. the plan would then have a number of cameras in different positions)? I suspect you'd make another shotplan for a camera cut.
I guess I'm just getting a feel of how much in terms of action/duration should be included into 1 sheet (i.e. basically what consitutes a shot).
Say for example George enters the scene, trips on his robe and falls forward. The camera tracks him from the door to the center of the room and stays there for the duration of the fall. Then cuts to a CU of his face flat on the floor.
Am I right to assume you'd have 1 sheet with an arrow to indicate the tracking cam and top layout of the action in your plan and the drawing of George falling in your frame? Then another sheet for the CU? And another for when the camera is in a medium shot as George is getting up? Different shots within the same scene.

Would a shotplan be necessary/useful for short 1-2 min animation production or better suited for longer animated shows?

Armin A
12-15-2004, 09:25 AM
Thanx for shering, I have one quastion what is difrence between panel and shot. For me evry new camera in a scene is new shot, but I dont understand what panel is.

kamsvag
12-15-2004, 10:43 AM
Wow instant reply! :)
And yes that did help to explain what goes into the shotplan.

Just a few more queries:
Do you indicate your camera moves in the shot plan? Does this include cuts within the same scene (i.e. the plan would then have a number of cameras in different positions)? I suspect you'd make another shotplan for a camera cut.
I guess I'm just getting a feel of how much in terms of action/duration should be included into 1 sheet (i.e. basically what consitutes a shot).
Say for example George enters the scene, trips on his robe and falls forward. The camera tracks him from the door to the center of the room and stays there for the duration of the fall. Then cuts to a CU of his face flat on the floor.
Am I right to assume you'd have 1 sheet with an arrow to indicate the tracking cam and top layout of the action in your plan and the drawing of George falling in your frame? Then another sheet for the CU? And another for when the camera is in a medium shot as George is getting up? Different shots within the same scene.

Would a shotplan be necessary/useful for short 1-2 min animation production or better suited for longer animated shows?
I usualy just show the movement of the camera, in the shotplan, not the cuts. The kind of transition between the scenes I usualy keep in the storyboard, between the panels. I also indicate movement of the camera in the storyboard panels. This is mainly cause I flesh out my whole sequence in storyboards first, including the kind of transition between the scenes, once I'm happy with my storyboarding I move onto the shotplanning sheets. I organize my sheets in a binder as below:


1st chapter, a briefe description of the chapter that follows
1st chapter, storyboards of the chapter
1st chapter, shotplans of the chapter
2nd chapter, a briefe description of the chapter that follows
2nd chapter, storyboards of the chapter
2nd chapter, shotplans of the chapter
and so on...
You asked if a shotplan would be neccesary for a short pice of animation.
I'd say it depends on how complex the production should be. If you're going for extreeme details and plenty of cuts I'd say yeah, though you might as well go for a longer piece wich realy doesn't contain lots of different elements, perhaps just an interesting story, then I would be saticfied with a well planed storyboard.

kamsvag
12-15-2004, 10:45 AM
Thanx for shering, I have one quastion what is difrence between panel and shot. For me evry new camera in a scene is new shot, but I dont understand what panel is.
Sometimes you might not be able to describe a shot in one single panel of the storyboard, then you got a shot divided over several panels. So as you see, there's a difference between a shot and a panel.

:)

mahir
12-15-2004, 12:28 PM
Thanx kamsvag. I'll keep that in mind and see if I can put the shotplanning sheet to good use.

Kid-Mesh
12-15-2004, 02:30 PM
Excellent templates thanks for providing :)

Frelp
12-15-2004, 08:30 PM
This is really cool kamsvag. Really good of you to share this stuff. I'll certainly be putting it to good use!


Cheers!

Iced_Eagle
12-15-2004, 11:25 PM
Thank you for sharing those sheets! :)


Everything will be so neat/clean/organized now, much better for production!

darcru
12-21-2004, 04:41 PM
Thanks so much for the sheets, I can see where they would definitely keep you more organized. I created a small short film awhile back and had a lot of trouble keeping up with things. You never realize how many shots are done in a film until you start planning one out and half the battle is having a solid plan on keeping it organized.

Once again, thanks :D

eRaDiCaT0r
12-23-2004, 09:56 AM
Good posting. I needed to read someones question about organizing shots again so I can plan out my personal film project in the coming weeks instead of doodling with it in my head and sketchbook.

Nitefyre
12-27-2004, 08:20 AM
Thanks kamsvag, this is excellent. I had 3 different sheets for the one sheet you have, will definately put good use to this. Thanks again!

Julez4001
01-10-2005, 12:46 PM
Thanks for the sheet.

LiQuiD12
01-10-2005, 01:06 PM
Thanks for sharing :thumbsup:

maxx10
01-10-2005, 01:47 PM
Yup... thanks, they're nice and tidy :thumbsup:

Nigel B
01-11-2005, 06:41 AM
Awesome sheets, and thanks for sharing, i have only had a quick look, but already I can see the benefit.

kamsvag
01-11-2005, 06:47 AM
Glad you guys enjoy 'em.

Cheers!

yade
01-13-2005, 02:04 PM
Thanks a lot for sharing the documents! I was looking all over on the Internet for some kind of guidelines, and this does help me a lot. :)

jmBoekestein
01-14-2005, 03:14 PM
Thanks man,

I'm in filmschool right now for VFX, I'm really eager to learn these sort of things. Because I usually need something to hold onto. I forget things or lose track of documents, it's a horror.

DVmaker
10-31-2005, 06:21 PM
Here's a 16x9 mod of the shot planing sheet.
enjoy!
aj


http://media.filmexposure.org/ShotPlan(16x9).jpg - LINK (http://media.filmexposure.org/ShotPlan(16x9).jpg)

TAMcCullough
11-18-2005, 11:21 PM
I can't download the sheets.

kamsvag
11-19-2005, 08:30 AM
It's cause my internetsuplier (who also provides me withe a small webhotell) screwed up my website and I re-uploaded the thing. I must have missed upL the documents. I'll fix that sometime today.

Cheers!

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