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View Full Version : Is there a way to incorporate the mannequin


Kameel
12-08-2004, 03:07 AM
When drawing characters, I'm sure everybody is familiar with the wooden mannequin's. I'm finally starting to make a transition from 2d to 3d art. I was wondering does anybody model the human body in seperate steps: Upper torso, lower torso, pelvis,limbs, etc. ? I understand modelling better this way, but I haven't found any turorials that supports this method. If anybody uses this, please give some feedback, thanks.

oxygen_77
12-09-2004, 04:56 AM
I've seen some models that were created like you suggest. They even went as far as modelling all the pieces to remain separate during the animation process. It's kind-of a cool idea in that you don't have to worry about mesh deformations when you model and animate this way. Sorry though, I don't know of any tutorials that specifically teach this method... good luck!
:thumbsup:

Kameel
12-09-2004, 05:30 AM
Thanks for the reply Oxygen!!! I appreciate the comment, especially on the fact that seperate parts, cuts down on the mesh deformation problem!!! I've finally had the time to create my own character after 2 1/2 yrs. I'm finally looking forward to finishing a character.

oxygen_77
12-09-2004, 04:46 PM
You're welcome... Post some pics to this thread so I can see what you make! :)

This is completely off topic, but I just noticed you're in Georgia... I went to college for 4 years at Georgia Southern (in Statesboro). I used to travel up through Macon all the time....

Kameel
12-09-2004, 08:13 PM
Small world..LOL. Everybody that graduated from my home town (Alamo, Georgia) went to college at either Southern, or Fort Valley State. What year did you attend?

oxygen_77
12-09-2004, 08:22 PM
Small world..LOL. Everybody that graduated from my home town (Alamo, Georgia) went to college at either Southern, or Fort Valley State. What year did you attend?I started in 1995 and left in 1999 for a job in Charleston, SC where I finished my degree.

Kameel
12-09-2004, 09:32 PM
What was your major? I went to the Art Institute of Atlanta in 95-95. I majored in 3d animation/ Multimedia, but I don't feel like I've learned anything. I ended up getting a certification in 3ds Max from Central Ga. Technical College. I'm also, starting at High Tech Institute in Marrietta in March. I love 3d animation, but I'm finding it very furstratating to make a transition to 3d. I can model non organic forms like chairs buildings, and whatever, but Organic forms like Humans and aliens etc., is what I'm judging my abilities on. I can model the body, but I have trouble detailing the form. I also, need training on texturing, rigging, and lighting. Any help you can give on modelling period would be greatly appreciated!!!

oxygen_77
12-09-2004, 09:50 PM
What was your major? I went to the Art Institute of Atlanta in 95-95. I majored in 3d animation/ Multimedia, but I don't feel like I've learned anything. I ended up getting a certification in 3ds Max from Central Ga. Technical College. I'm also, starting at High Tech Institute in Marrietta in March. I love 3d animation, but I'm finding it very furstratating to make a transition to 3d. I can model non organic forms like chairs buildings, and whatever, but Organic forms like Humans and aliens etc., is what I'm judging my abilities on. I can model the body, but I have trouble detailing the form. I also, need training on texturing, rigging, and lighting. Any help you can give on modelling period would be greatly appreciated!!!My major was Computer Science. So far I haven't used any of what I learned there for any job I've had... Now that I have my own company and am I carpenter on the side I really have little use for what I learned in college...

As far as modelling organic objects goes, I've found it's best to have a solid grasp of how to draw the object in 2D first. Once you've got that down you shouldn't have much of a problem with the 3D part. I usually start with a basic shape and then mould it to be what I want using smooth shifting, cutting, and simply dragging polys. This is entirely different from how I draw because when I draw I simply create all the lines just as I want them to begin with. I don't lay out the basic shape and then go back and add detail. I've just found though that getting the basic shape in 3D and then adding detail keeps me from making any unneccessary polys thereby giving me a more efficient mesh.

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