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Littleberu
11-03-2004, 08:44 PM
Hi,

I'm currently looking for buying a Tablet, and I know Wacom is a very good company. The problem is, I can't make the diffrence from Intuos and Graphire (cheaper than the Intuos). I mean, for 199$, I can have a Graphire 6X8, but for the same thing in the Intuos, it cost 329.99$.

So my question is, what are the major differences from one and another, and what should I choose?

-Vormav-
11-03-2004, 08:47 PM
The Intuos detects tilt, as well as pressure and all that other stuff.
Wouldn't surprise me if it had more controlled sensitivity...but the tilt is the main thing.

Littleberu
11-03-2004, 08:51 PM
The Intuos detects tilt, as well as pressure and all that other stuff.
Wouldn't surprise me if it had more controlled sensitivity...but the tilt is the main thing.
Ok so the Graphire doesn't detect pressure?

Goon
11-03-2004, 08:59 PM
no, the graphire does detect pressure, but it has 512 levels of sensitivity versus the intous's 1024

Also, the new intuous has a higher dpi resolution, as well as buttons, etc.

Littleberu
11-03-2004, 09:02 PM
no, the graphire does detect pressure, but it has 512 levels of sensitivity versus the intous's 1024

Also, the new intuous has a higher dpi resolution, as well as buttons, etc.
Ok, now, I'm beginning with all of this, but will the lack of tilt and the higher levels of sensitivity will bother me in the future? Or what do you guys use?

All I want to know is should I pay the big price now, or buy the Intuos later when I'm more experienced?

oshiroii
11-03-2004, 09:11 PM
Best thing to do is just compare the 2 of them on the wacom site.

I'll tell you some of the stuff I found out:
- I "recearched" for about 3 months about wacoms, and almost eveyone said I deffinitally shouln't go for a Graphire, it woul be more worth it to buy and intuos.
-The intuos's got more features, like the tilt sensitivity
-Intuos is more precise
-Intuos's got the new buttons on the 3rd version
-I'm sure there are more things, just compare ;)

Now here's some of my own things:
I think that you should think of what you're going to do with it. Are you going to use it for art? Seriously make textures, 2d paintings or maybe even 2d flash animations? Or are you using it for navigation, since a wacom is much better for your health than a mouse.
If you want it for navigation you could buy a Graphire, it's cheaper and if you buy the A4 (the version after 6x8) it woul be twice as precise, since the active area doubled. If going for art, I'd suggest the Intuos.

I'm absolutly no expert, but I hope this helps some :D
-shiroii

Littleberu
11-03-2004, 09:16 PM
Best thing to do is just compare the 2 of them on the wacom site.

I'll tell you some of the stuff I found out:
- I "recearched" for about 3 months about wacoms, and almost eveyone said I deffinitally shouln't go for a Graphire, it woul be more worth it to buy and intuos.
-The intuos's got more features, like the tilt sensitivity
-Intuos is more precise
-Intuos's got the new buttons on the 3rd version
-I'm sure there are more things, just compare ;)

Now here's some of my own things:
I think that you should think of what you're going to do with it. Are you going to use it for art? Seriously make textures, 2d paintings or maybe even 2d flash animations? Or are you using it for navigation, since a wacom is much better for your health than a mouse.
If you want it for navigation you could buy a Graphire, it's cheaper and if you buy the A4 (the version after 6x8) it woul be twice as precise, since the active area doubled. If going for art, I'd suggest the Intuos.

I'm absolutly no expert, but I hope this helps some :D
-shiroii
I'm gonna use it for art for sure. 2D paintings, texutres. Not sure about navigation though.

So I think I'll go with the Intuos. It's pricey, but if you guys say it's better that way.

jscott
11-03-2004, 10:30 PM
The Intuos also comes with a much better pen.

-jscot

ironfinger
11-05-2004, 07:33 AM
I use an 6x8 intuous at work and a 4x5 graphire at home. The difference is insignificant to me. I've done full digital paintings switching between intuos and graphire without noticing the transition. The only way I'd get an intuous is if I could get it cheap and used. For me the biggest influence on pen feel is the software i'm using... ie, how painter 6 feels vs. crappy painter 7 vs. decent painter 8 vs. photoshop etc.. It also takes some time getting used to the coordination of drawing with a tablet. The key is to not give up. After a couple paintings all should be good.

Daniel
11-05-2004, 08:27 AM
Well its not an easy choice :)
If you are new, and just wanna try out a pad, I suggest you buying a Graphire. If you have the money for a Intuos3, get one! The new extra buttons on the INutos 3 looks very nice, I read you can assign shortcuts to the buttons, so you don't have to use the keyboard. Shortcuts are important to work fast (eg. pan, color picker, copy paste etc.).

Technicaly, I'm not sure if you can fell the extra presure level on a intuos. I work with an old ArtPad/Ultra Pad, graphire 1 and intuos 1 and 2. They are all good, no question! I use a big Ultra Pad at home with I guess 256 presure levels, not much compared to one of those new pads, but you don't fell a big difference. The old ultra pad also has Pen tilt detection. Thier Pens are much lighter and more slim compared to the new intuos and intuos grip pen.

Why not check out ebay, may you can get a good and cheap pad there?

But my next Pad will be a intuos3 (A5 or A4), just because of the new pad buttons :)

regards.

imashination
11-05-2004, 11:00 AM
a wacom is much better for your health than a mouse.

This, is wrong. A tablet will give you RSI about three times as fast as a standard mouse will.

I would say go with the graphire. You won't notice any sensitivity problems and very few people use the tilt feature. In fact, have a look for older stock of intuos tablets, they may be going cheap now that the new ones are out.

Runciter
11-05-2004, 11:32 AM
I have a Graphire2 and I'm perfectly happy with it. I have never used a intuos, though.

Joel Hooks
11-05-2004, 01:16 PM
The graphire's drawing surface is like drawing on hard plastic, where as the intuos feels like a more natural media. Maybe you wouldn't notice if you've never used the intuos, but there is a definite quality difference.

oshiroii
11-05-2004, 01:50 PM
This, is wrong. A tablet will give you RSI about three times as fast as a standard mouse will.

I would say go with the graphire. You won't notice any sensitivity problems and very few people use the tilt feature. In fact, have a look for older stock of intuos tablets, they may be going cheap now that the new ones are out.

Could you explain this? As far as I know a pen is much healthier than a mouse. When using a mouse you actually twist you hand, right? It's not a natural position. If I draw for 5 hours I'll feel nothing, if I use a mouse for 5 hours, my hand/arm can become a bit tired. I've never heard anyone complaining about a tablet and most RSI patience use a tablet as alternative to a mouse. If I'm wrong please explain it to me, don't want to have any false thoughts :thumbsup:

Dave Black
11-05-2004, 08:21 PM
FWIW, I have both an Intuos and a graphire.

I like the graphire better. Can you honestly make 1024 levels of pressure with your wrist? I can't. I can detect about 5 levels when I use either.

The tilt comes in handy with programs like Painter, but honestly, I don't care for the outcome.

Buy the graphire. It's small(which means less work moving the stylus around), and it's cheap.

I honestly can say, I like the way the graphire feels more and if I were to buy just one, regardless of price, I'd get the graphire.

-Dave

nafa
11-06-2004, 12:57 AM
Using a mouse to draw or paint is a health harzard. If you care to browse thru art instruction sites, many will carry the warning. This is borned out by my personal experience. I can draw for a long time using the pen without tiring. However, when I browse the net (I use the mouse), I grew tired much quicker. On those days I did more browsing than drawing, I will feel discomfort in my arm/wrist when I go to bed.

I surmise that the main harm comes from having to press the mouse buttons to draw/paint. This means prolonged stress to those muscles involved in the action. Using a pen, the need to press button is significantly reduced.

Regarding the choice of tablets. Go with the Intuos 3 if money is no concern. Also go with the Intuos 3 if you have cramped work space. The Intuos 3 comes with programmable express keys and finger sensitive touch strips. With the express keys, the need to use the keyboard will be significantly reduced. The touch strips will let you scrol/zoom using your non-drawing hand to improve productivity.

If higher productivity/workspace constraint are not issues, and you have alternative use of the hundred odd dollars saving, then going with the cheaper Graphire can definitely be considered. You are unlikely to be disappointed by its performance.

The Gunslinger
11-11-2004, 10:44 AM
What are the main differences between an Intuos 2 and an Intuos 3? So far as I can surmise, it lies in the express strip or whatever. I've looked for it for a while, but I couldn't find anything. I figured I'd turn to the good old CGTalk forums.

If I could get a brand new Intuos 2 9x12 tablet for $300, it would be worth it, right? I'm definitely getting an intuous if I get one, and I've been looking at them for quite a while.

So, CGTalk brains, what is the big difference between the Intuos 2 and 3, and are these differences really so big that it would enrage you that you actually bought the Intuos 2 rather than 3? ...of course, this is considering you're easily enraged and you plan on using it to create textures for animations, as well as digital paintings (and possibly navigation if it's condusive to laziness).

rebo
11-11-2004, 01:51 PM
I got a intuous2 , 1 week before intuos3 came out. But im not annoyed because the product is really that good.

Lyr
11-11-2004, 02:04 PM
This, is wrong. A tablet will give you RSI about three times as fast as a standard mouse will.


Got any supporting evidence for this claim?

imashination
11-11-2004, 06:58 PM
I dont have anything to hand right now, but if you use a pen exclusively instead of a mouse all day, the RSI will be noticably worse. If you use a pen in conjunction with a mouse, this is the best choice because you excercise difference muscles, reducing the chances of getting rsi from either device.

If you can alternate between 2 or 3 devices, this is going to be best. Mouse, trackball, tablet etc.

oshiroii
11-11-2004, 09:36 PM
I dont have anything to hand right now, but if you use a pen exclusively instead of a mouse all day, the RSI will be noticably worse. If you use a pen in conjunction with a mouse, this is the best choice because you excercise difference muscles, reducing the chances of getting rsi from either device.

If you can alternate between 2 or 3 devices, this is going to be best. Mouse, trackball, tablet etc.

There actually is some logic in it. You get RSI by doing the same movements over and over again for a long time. Even if holding a pen is better for your muscles it might hurt you in a while. Altering is a good idea, using a keyboard for a while is good too. Take a brake chat some, browse forums, or go outside into the real world of couse :D

I like the tablets, but I'm not really convinced for the use in 3d programs. I think the pen could be nice for things weigthing, laying out UV's, maybe animation, but for modeling or things with a looot of zooming, panning, rotating NO WAY! It feels too slow for modeling. Anyhow, that might be a good thing, this way you can alternate ;) Great tool, lovely for painting stuff :thumbsup:

kromekat
11-12-2004, 01:05 AM
I went from a Graphire 2 to an Intuos 2 (both A6), and there is a definite difference in surface feel as mentioned already - the intuos has more 'tooth' to the surface, more natural. You can notice the 512/1024 levels difference too when airbrushing which was the prime reason I upgraded to the Intuos - I don't mean in some finite way, but in a way that makes your strokes more easily gradiated.

I use mine for almost everything; navigation, painting, modeling etc with no problems - it's a far more comfortable way to work and navigate IMO. And as for the RSI - anything done repetitively can do that, but I feel far less strain and weariness from the tablet to a mouse.

If you are going to do a lot of painting, I think you'd outgrow the Graphire fairly quickly.

:thumbsup:

thebruce
11-20-2004, 07:43 AM
Hi,
I really want a Intuos now, I don't use a graphire but a cheapass trust tablet ;) But it didn't cost me more than $20. And I now know that I need more control. I did use the graphire once, it felt like the trust, hardsurface. My gf uses an intuos at school, she can't draw with my trust, but with the intuos it's easy she says. I'm still saving money though ;)

DBolivar
11-21-2004, 09:03 PM
The more levels a tablet has the more sensitive to slight variations it will be, the smaller the step between, say.. brush size. If you want a more natural response go for more pressure levels and tilt sensitivity. In the long run a larger investment will pay off in both your work and your habits using a graphics tablet.



Also to consider is the size of your tablet. Are you a long-stroke artist or a more wrist-stroke person? That is something you need to bear in mind when choosing a tablet, since more pressure levels will be of prime importance in smaller tablets where pen movements are less exaggerated.


It all narrows down to what you will be doing with it however. How precise you need your strokes to be how loyal to traditional mediums you need your pen to be.

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