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omar C
10-22-2004, 02:04 PM
guys i'm having some problems here...

i had to make this litl design for a organization, what they are going to do is print the design out .

this was actually the first thime that i'm makiung sommething to later print it out ,now i understand that when you make sommething and you want to print it out...you need a certain DPI level....etc

i just starting making the darn cards ...now the organization where the cards are for whent to a print shop and they told her to bring in the card design ...with the including font type or the PDF file

it should be atleast 800dpi and it must be delivered without compression whatever that means....

problem is when i finnished making this i didn't saved it as psd ...

i just made it in the exact same size the original card was going to be...incl font ...etc here's the card

is there a way for me to turn it into 800dpi or sommething now its 72:D the thing is when i turn up the resolution the image becomes huge and totally unsharp/ugly

here's the card



http://users.pandora.be/productions_image/ok1.jpg

geoff3dnz
10-22-2004, 02:39 PM
Assuming the file you posted is what you were going to supply, it's simply too small. That will never print well. The file you posted here was 156mm x 109mm (@ 72 ppi). If the printing company need it at 800 dpi (which sounds ridiculously high to me, 300 is standard) you're going to need a file that is 4923 PIXELS wide, and 3446 PIXELS high. DPI means nothing if you don't have the image size in pixels right.

So you are going to have to recreate the artwork again, this time starting at that size (in pixels). You can't blow up the image you have to 156mm x 109mm @ 800dpi and expect it to look good, unless you created the original artwork as a vector format (which would have worked well for a design like that).

And the 'uncompressed' format they were talking about is any file format that doesn't compress the file to the detriment of the quality of the image, so that means NO jpegs! Save the file out as a tiff or photoshop eps file (common print formats).

Hope that helps somewhat. :)

omar C
10-22-2004, 03:05 PM
hi thanks for youre reply

but this is what i don't get (sorry for that its actually the first time i made a design that needs to get printed)

quote :"you're going to need a file that is 4923 PIXELS wide, and 3446 PIXELS high. DPI means nothing if you don't have the image size in pixels right."


ok so the card needs to be lets say 16cm wide and 11 cm high.when its printed.
the tekst and stuff i did using photoshop ...

how do i get lets say 300dpi without everything looking that big...example if i make a new file in photoshop wide set to 16cm high set to 11cm and with resolution 300 pixels/inch (cmyk collor)

then if i type in a tekst with the tekst size set to 6pt than i cant even read one letter because its way to big....

i don't want to sound stupid but i just don't get it:shrug:

geoff3dnz
10-22-2004, 03:13 PM
First, make sure that your units are indeed cm, and not mm or something. 16cm x 11cm @ 300dpi = 1890 pixels x 1299 pixels. Once you've made your document check by going to the 'Image > Image Size...' menu. If you don't get those numbers in pixels, there's something wrong with your units. You're doing the right thing by starting a new document with those settings, so I don't quite know what the problem with 6pt text is... I've just tried it here, and 6pt type looks like I would expect it to. Small. Try going to the view menu and choosing 'Print Size' - that will show you approximately what your cards going to look like size-wise when printed.

omar C
10-22-2004, 06:18 PM
hey thanx allot for your help Geoff3dnz...

this sucks mate ,now i need to do everything all over again and it needs to be finnished by monday and i still have heeps of work to do for school...:sad: there goes my weekend

by the way , verry nice work in your gallery

webshot
10-22-2004, 07:54 PM
in ps when you create a new document in the dialogue box set the dpi to 300 and ad set your dimensions, then you are done. Always make your design sightly bigger that what you need. This is call the bleed area. From the looks of your design you will definately need that bleed area. If you dont you may have to do it over again. Bleed area is very important.

omar C
10-22-2004, 09:30 PM
in ps when you create a new document in the dialogue box set the dpi to 300 and ad set your dimensions, then you are done. Always make your design sightly bigger that what you need. This is call the bleed area. From the looks of your design you will definately need that bleed area. If you dont you may have to do it over again. Bleed area is very important.

i don't get this guys

ok look i did everything you said

i made a new file

*hight 11cm
*weidth 16 cm
*resolution 300 pixels/inch
*cmyk color

now when i Try going to the view menu and choosing 'Print Size' - just like Geoff3dzn said then i get a card that looks more or less like the size i want it in.

but when i save that exact card (save for web) than i get a HUGE card or should i say poster the size of this....now could be me but this doesnt look like 11cm on 16cm....

http://users.pandora.be/productions_image/huh.jpg


whats going on here?

omar C
10-22-2004, 09:37 PM
and one more thing when i then load this exact file in photoshop i get these numbers



http://users.pandora.be/productions_image/size.jpg


resolution is now again 72pixels/inch

and the card is 66,68 cm width and 45,83 cm high


what the heck am i doing wrong here

hypercube
10-22-2004, 09:47 PM
You do realize that DPI originally means dots per inch, right? 300 pixels in one INCH, which is a little over 2.5cm.

Things are printed out that way so you can't see the pixels and it looks smooth. The DPI usually varies with what the needs are. 800 is a little severe though just for some cards.

A 300 DPI image is going to look huge on your screen because you're viewing it on your monitor, which is showing 72 DPI..over 4 times larger than it's going to print out at. Think of it as being zoomed in on it.

edit: heh well yeah since you're not even rendering this stuff in LW it is a bit off-forum. There are actually some specific issues regarding rendering large in LW but those are likely in a thread already.

Ultimatum
10-22-2004, 09:48 PM
No offense man, but does this topic have anything to do with Lightwave?...


The bigger the image looks on your monitor, the better it will look printed.



- ultimatum

geoff3dnz
10-22-2004, 09:51 PM
OK. First of all, this is CORRECT. You are not having a problem. This is the size that you should supply to the printer. Second of all, DON'T use 'Save for web' for saving the file for the printer. If you read my earlier posts, you should save it as a tiff or eps file, definitely NOT a jpeg or gif (which is what save for web will do).

If you read my posts you should be aware that you SHOULD end up with a file that is that big (in PIXELS).

To change the resolution in the image size dialog box, make sure you UNCHECK the checkbox that says 'Nieuwe beeldpixels berekenen', and then enter 300. It'll come out at 16cm x 11cm.

webshot
10-22-2004, 10:05 PM
this is correct as monitors view on 72 dpi so you image will be huge. When that doc goes to the printer you will be cool. And most printers will want a tiff, pdf, ai and not a gif. Not enough color info in a .gif. You should consult your printer before exporting. Do a google for bleed are and crop marks. Those are very important in the print world.

Also maybe you should move this to the photoshop forum.

omar C
10-22-2004, 11:17 PM
ok thank you everybody for helping me out, i know this isn't the wright place to post this question in the first place but since i'm always in the LW section and always get great help here i asked it here ,i did asked it in the photoshop section but i didn't really got anny useful help there -> http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=180267



annyway thanks again everybody

kind regards

ArtisticVisions
10-23-2004, 09:12 PM
The bigger the image looks on your monitor, the better it will look printed.Not true at all; depending on the what the resolution greatly affects the Print. If you try to change either the size (in other words, inventing pixels that didn't previously exist) or the resolution of an image in Photoshop, you could have either a image that is the right size, but poor quality print or a very small size, but high print quality. When doing anything, be it rendering or Photoshop work, and it's going to be printed, make it at the size you need at 300 or more resolution.

OK. First of all, this is CORRECT. You are not having a problem. This is the size that you should supply to the printer. Second of all, DON'T use 'Save for web' for saving the file for the printer. If you read my earlier posts, you should save it as a tiff or eps file, definitely NOT a jpeg or gif (which is what save for web will do).
Unless the printer you're using supports Postscript printing, you do not want to save your image as a eps. file; if you do, the print quality will be poorer than if you had used a tiff or tagra file format.

geoff3dnz
10-23-2004, 09:28 PM
Unless the printer you're using supports Postscript printing, you do not want to save your image as a eps. file; if you do, the print quality will be poorer than if you had used a tiff or tagra file format.Really? I didn't know that. We've always used printers that use postscript I suppose... :shrug: What kind of quality loss would occur?

ArtisticVisions
10-23-2004, 11:27 PM
Really? I didn't know that. We've always used printers that use postscript I suppose... :shrug: What kind of quality loss would occur?Try imaging what would happen if you save you file as a jpeg with 0% compression, followed by enlarging your file by 500-600 percent it's initial size...... then print it out.
That's how it would look. :eek:

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