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View Full Version : question about DPI, printing....


omar C
10-22-2004, 01:49 PM
guys i'm having some problems here...

i had to make this litl design for a organization, what they are going to do is print the design out .

this was actually the first thime that i'm makiung sommething to later print it out ,now i understand that when you make sommething and you want to print it out...you need a certain DPI level....etc

i just starting making the darn cards ...now the organization where the cards are for whent to a print shop and they told her to bring in the card design ...with the including font type or the PDF file

it should be atleast 800dpi and it must be delivered without compression whatever that means....

problem is when i finnished making this i didn't saved it as psd ...

i just made it in the exact same size the original card was going to be...incl font ...etc here's the card

is there a way for me to turn it into 800dpi or sommething now its 72:D the thing is when i turn up the resolution the image becomes huge and totally unsharp/ugly

here's the card

http://users.pandora.be/productions_image/ok1.jpg

wolver1ne
10-22-2004, 02:58 PM
Should have started designing at 800dpi from the beginning.

omar C
10-22-2004, 03:46 PM
Should have started designing at 800dpi from the beginning.

i figured that one out myself ...

vand
10-22-2004, 03:55 PM
redo the whole thing again

halo
10-22-2004, 04:31 PM
there is no way to make a 72dpi into an 800dpi image and hope to get the same look of quality...its scrap.

its more common to do design like that in illustrator, freehand, quark or indesign etc. in the first place.

dwin
10-23-2004, 02:16 PM
I'm not sure that this can help you. Try to get a software to make the picture bigger, like Altamira. If you're using photoshop CS, you can do this: Image->image size, check the resample image and use bicubic smoother, switch the unit of measurement (in document size group) to percent and type 110%. It'll increase your image in 10%. Do it repeatedly don't make the percentage more than 110%.

After that open a new file with size that you'll print and change the resolution to 800dpi. Copy from the increase size image file to the 800dpi file. The image will be smaller.

I'm not sure that this can help you because it'll increase about 10 times from the original size and i'm not sure that program like altamira can help you too. Just try it first.

halo
10-23-2004, 02:54 PM
it makes little difference between doing it in 10% jumps or 100%...72 dpi to 800 will always look like crap.

Techniques to blow up artwork outside of PS's own interpolation methods often offer very little advantage (sometimes none) over just uprezing them in PS. Mostly people think that there is some holy grail solution out there, but in reality its often those who dont know or understand the pros and cons of other methods that often attempt to use them, the lack of understanding of the original problem being the biggest hurdle in the first place. :|

Elysian
10-23-2004, 06:13 PM
Yeah, well said Halo!

dwin
10-24-2004, 07:12 AM
I agree with you halo, it's imposible to increase 72 dpi into 800 dpi.

chromeallusion
10-24-2004, 07:36 AM
It appears that you created ar piece that does not have enough pixels to support the higher resolution capabilities of the printer. You should always make sure that you have a proper scan before you create the graphic. Increasing the resolution will not help you because Photoshop will just keep adding pixels until the file gets to the size that you specify and since it's not a true scan it will visually look blur and degraded.

If it's possible rescan the material. I you no longer have the original content then use Genuine Fractal to increae the file size.

Good luck

glacius
10-24-2004, 02:02 PM
actually its not impossible but im not sure u get the best qual ..if u go inot imags size and change the DPI to 700 the image get HUGE ...but then REZIZE the images in IMAGE size back to the the size it was before u changed the DPI ..then u have the same size but 700 DPI im not sure if this will look good or not but its worh tryin :)

TheNeverman
10-25-2004, 07:54 PM
There's a few eye-brow raisers in this post...

First - understand that you can NOT change the DPI of an image, you have no control over it what-so-ever. DPI is a characteristic of the device an image is being printed on.

You CAN resample the 'PPI' of an image thru several different alogrithms included with Photoshop (nearest neighbor, bilinear, bicubic), but the fact is - you can never get a 'true' 800ppi image from a 72ppi image.

The simple answer is to re-do this graphic in a vector format - because it would then be resolution independent - whereas a raster image (from photoshop) 'is' resolution dependent.

n8

Sil3
10-25-2004, 08:15 PM
it should be atleast 800dpi and it must be delivered without compression whatever that means....

800 Dpi´s for a business card :eek::eek:

Someone must be drunk or are those cards going to become huge posters?

A quick rule of Dpi´s is:

300 Dpis (Dots per Inch) are the norm for print work because things are printed at 150 Lpis (Lines per Inch). Dpi´s should always be the double of Lpis.

The vast majority of stuff is still printed in 133 Lpi´s, so 266 Dpis is more than enough, newspapers are printed at 75 Lpis (images are sent at 150 Dpis) because the paper is so poor that it cant absorb all the ink quantity without becoming a bloody mess.

Magazine covers are/should be printed at 150 Lpis (since the paper is better) probably this is why 300 Dpis image files are required for all regular printed work.

I never sent any business card at more than 150 Dpis, it´s overkill, specially some years ago when Computers where not that fast and we could take almost the entire morning off before Photoshop would do a Blur...oh boy did Computers got fast or what hehehe

I sent many times magazine pages at 150 Dpis and comparing it against 300 Dpis after printed, sometimes we couldn´t even tell the diference, of course not all cases are the same.

Redo your stuff in a vector program ( that by nature are resolution independent) and save it as a PDF, ask them why they need an 800 Dpi file, probably they misunderstood something, very common on Pre-Pres and Design clients :rolleyes:

Best of luck

algo
10-25-2004, 11:52 PM
I agree with Sil3. I think it's a bit exaggerated to ask for an 800 DPI document, I work in graphics for quite some time, and the highest quality I got to was 560 DPI for a billboard,
so you might want to talk to them again and make sure of exactly what they need.

In any case, you can't grow details where there aren't any, so I'm afraid you'll have to do the design again.
Vector apalications such as Illustrator, Free Hand, etc. seem like the best choise for that kind of design, but of course you'll have to learn one first...

If you used "paths" or "shapes" in your work then you can use them again in higher resolutions as they are Vectors and therefore resolution independent, moreover you can try and trace with paths over the different parts of your work and then use them to fill in the colors after you've set the document to the right resolution.

And one last thing - ALWAYS SAVE A LAYERD DOCUMENT!!!

omar C
10-27-2004, 12:01 PM
thank you for the help everybody ,i'm doing the entire card all over again there's no other solution annyway so i guess i'm stuck ...annyway its a great lesson for me and i will make sure that it never hapens again


once again thnx everyone for helping out i appreciate it.

cheers

halo
10-27-2004, 12:43 PM
800 Dpi´s for a business card :eek::eek:

Someone must be drunk or are those cards going to become huge posters?

A quick rule of Dpi´s is:

300 Dpis (Dots per Inch) are the norm for print work because things are printed at 150 Lpis (Lines per Inch). Dpi´s should always be the double of Lpis.

The vast majority of stuff is still printed in 133 Lpi´s, so 266 Dpis is more than enough, newspapers are printed at 75 Lpis (images are sent at 150 Dpis) because the paper is so poor that it cant absorb all the ink quantity without becoming a bloody mess.

Magazine covers are/should be printed at 150 Lpis (since the paper is better) probably this is why 300 Dpis image files are required for all regular printed work.

I never sent any business card at more than 150 Dpis, it´s overkill, specially some years ago when Computers where not that fast and we could take almost the entire morning off before Photoshop would do a Blur...oh boy did Computers got fast or what hehehe

I sent many times magazine pages at 150 Dpis and comparing it against 300 Dpis after printed, sometimes we couldn´t even tell the diference, of course not all cases are the same.

Redo your stuff in a vector program ( that by nature are resolution independent) and save it as a PDF, ask them why they need an 800 Dpi file, probably they misunderstood something, very common on Pre-Pres and Design clients :rolleyes:

Best of luck

This isn't strictly correct.

300 dpi is a rule of thumb of doubling the line screen of the print device which is on average 150lpi. HOWEVER, this only applies to contone images where pixels are broken down into dots by the line screen. Solid line art such as text will demand higher contrast on the edges of type etc than a continous tone image where the contrast between pixels is a lot less and therefore requires much higher resolution because the screen may not break down the image at all under certain cirumstances. FWIW imagesetters rasterize line art at between 1200dpi and 2400dpi on each plate. This is because if an image is solid on a plate the screen doesn't affect it at all...if you are aiming for high end repro and suppling rastered artwork then that is where you should be aiming for....hence the request for 800 dpi. This may be because their imagesetter or output isnt that high quality.

If you doubt what i'm saying, put your money where your mouth is and run 5pt type out at 300dpi on a repro imagesetter in black and white...make it nasty and run some 1 pixel lines at 45 degrees in black. You will see either antialiased and therefore fuzzy edges made from visible pixels or if you turned off antialiasing you will just see jaggy edges from the low resolution of 300dpi.

The easy solution is to work in the apps i previously mentioned and keep artwork unrasterised, that way the device its sent to rasterises it at its highest output it can keeping the quality as high as possible. Obviously you cant keep photos unrasterised but then as they are a contone (continous tone) image then you dont need them that high a resolution.

There are a myriad of devices out there with various final resolutions and screen frequencies which make for some seemingly odd resolution requests. Until you know all of the whole processes inside and out the best advice is to take the advice of the outputter before you start a job.

One day i'll make a sticky post here about DPI etc, why and how, because there is a lot of old wives tales and misinformation running around.

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