PDA

View Full Version : TIPS AND TRICKS: Photorealistic Images(Tell us your rendering tricks wth STANDARD LW)


RobertoOrtiz
10-15-2004, 03:02 PM
Ok I want to start a series of threads where tips and tricks for the use of Lightwave can be share. One are that I feel we all can talk a lot about is photorealistic rendering.

I would love to hear your methods for giving that extra 10 percent to you realistic rendering with STANDARD Lightwave.

I only have two rules for the thread:

*NO WHINNING
Lets keep the thread instructive.

*STAY ON TOPIC ( I MEAN IT)
As a user of a ton of 3rd party plugs (most of them by Steve Worley) I am quite aware of third party solutions for this. But the topic of this thread is for a LW only solution.

Looking forward to your comments.

-R

otacon
10-15-2004, 04:19 PM
Always bevel your edges.:wise:

MattClary
10-15-2004, 04:38 PM
Give your reflective surfaces something interesting to reflect.

Cman
10-15-2004, 04:44 PM
Use Proper light falloff -

leigh
10-15-2004, 05:08 PM
Pay attention to your lighting! Lighting is the most important ingredient for photorealism. Learn how the different lights work, which ones are best for different situations, how to mix colour into them and how to use your shadows effectively and correctly.

Lighting is a complex art, so be prepared to spend quite a bit of time with it.

monovich
10-15-2004, 06:18 PM
light falloff, huh? I use that sometimes, but I'm curious if you might elaborate about how you use it personally.

My tip: Use sub-patch modeling if you don't already. It's not for EVERYTHING, but very few things in real life are exactly square or beveled, sub-patch modeling is a great way to ensure things have natural "bevels" and curved edges found in real life.

leigh
10-15-2004, 06:22 PM
light falloff, huh? I use that sometimes, but I'm curious if you might elaborate about how you use it personally.

Well falloff is pretty essential for creating localised areas of light :)

Vertizor
10-15-2004, 07:10 PM
light falloff, huh? I use that sometimes, but I'm curious if you might elaborate about how you use it personally.
I followed the GI tutorial on NewTek's website. It explains how to setup a sky dome and turn off all texture channels and turn on luminosity. Put a gradient in the luminosity channel so the lighting doesn't look too bright. The sky dome becomes the light source. In the scene light itself turn off affect diffuse and specular, that way the GI of the sky dome is the only source of light in the scene. Also in the GI options, the ambient intensity could be adjusted to control brightness, as well as going back into your sky dome material and adjusting the gradient in luminosity.

jeremyhardin
10-15-2004, 07:26 PM
use textures in several or all channels, not just the color channel.

for example, copy the diffuse texture to the reflective texture channel and invert it (so very diffuse is not very reflective and vice versa).
same concept for specularity, glossiness, bump, transparency, etc. These details are more like real objects, and the areas of reflection and diffuse variation are usually linked in reality.

ztreem
10-15-2004, 10:52 PM
Remeber that you can use negative light sources too. Perfect to darken certain areas down.

architook
10-15-2004, 11:15 PM
Always bevel your edges.:wise:

I've always heard this advice, but I never really found any improvement to models when I tried it, certainly not to make the hassle worth it.

Anyone care to teach us how/why this is a good idea?

fig
10-16-2004, 12:54 AM
I've always heard this advice, but I never really found any improvement to models when I tried it, certainly not to make the hassle worth it.

Anyone care to teach us how/why this is a good idea?

because nothing in real life, sans maybe the edge of a knife blade, has a perfect sharp edge. by giving the edges of objects a slight bevel you give them a subtle edge highlight that makes it look more photoreal. try it with a basic 3-point lighting set-up and two simple objects, one with edges beveled and one without, and look at the difference.

chris

essencedesign
10-16-2004, 01:02 AM
My tip: Use sub-patch modeling if you don't already. It's not for EVERYTHING, but very few things in real life are exactly square or beveled, sub-patch modeling is a great way to ensure things have natural "bevels" and curved edges found in real life.Well,,,,I do not agree. The most "photoreal" detailed models I have ever made made little use of subpatches.....Boolean Boolean baby! with good cotrol of your boolean opps and bevel.....:thumbsup: ...especialy for mechanical objects.

gerardo
10-16-2004, 06:55 AM
Occlusion map/pass is our friend. DOF is our partner. Motion Blur is our best friend (in several ways) :)



Gerardo

CGTalk Moderation
01-19-2006, 02:00 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.