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brenly
10-12-2004, 07:24 AM
Just wondering what do people here think is the optimum page size for working on. For an A4 page what ppi do most people use.Does anyone know what the beta testers generally use.

Jinbrown
10-12-2004, 09:18 PM
Hi,

The size (dimensions) and Resolution (ppi, or pixels per inch) of your image depends entirely on you, how you prefer to work, what kind of art you're doing, how it will be used, etc.

Beta testers do what that title implies. They test.... everything... in as many scenarios as possible.

Maybe if you can describe what you want to do and how you want to use your art, someone can make suggestions.

kraal
10-13-2004, 05:27 AM
i am a fool and i usally paint at 3 to 5 time what i plan to print at ........ that is why i always ask for a hard drive for christmas, my birthday , easter , groundhogs day, columbus day .... every third saturday .... ect

brenly
10-14-2004, 01:26 AM
I use to work on pages that were quite small 150 ppi and was never really satisfied with the results of my paintings and of course the detail that I could get. I had no probs with brush speed. Now Im working around 250-300 ppi the brushes seem to look much nicer at this size. By increasing the ppi (resolution) your in actual fact increasing the size of the canvas. In real life you wouldnt use a pencil to create detail on a huge canvas say 2 metres in length. I was wondering with the array of paint brushes that come with painter what is the optimum resolution size for say a basic painting on an A4 canvas? Ive come to think 250-300 is. What do other people think. I know 100 is to small and Id say anything over 1000 would probably be ridiculous, maybe not.

Jinbrown
10-14-2004, 08:03 AM
I use to work on pages that were quite small 150 ppi and was never really satisfied with the results of my paintings and of course the detail that I could get. I had no probs with brush speed. Now Im working around 250-300 ppi the brushes seem to look much nicer at this size. By increasing the ppi (resolution) your in actual fact increasing the size of the canvas.

That's not true, brenly. Increasing the Resolution (ppi) only increases the number of pixels per inch. It does not increase the Width and Height in pixels, nor does it increase the printed image size. What it does do, as you said, is to increase visual quality when the image is printed and give you smaller pixels to work with when painting.

For instance, if we open a 300 x 300 pixel Canvas at 150 ppi, it will be a 300 pixel square on the screen.

If we change the Resolution from 150 ppi to 300 ppi, it will still be a 300 pixel square on the screen, but the number of pixels per inch is increased.

The difference is seen when we print:

A 300 x 300 pixel Canvas at 150 ppi will print a 2 inch square
(300 pixels divided by 150 pixels per inch = 2).

A 300 x 300 pixel Canvas at 300 ppi will print a 1 inch square
(300 pixels divided by 300 pixels per inch = 1).


In real life you wouldnt use a pencil to create detail on a huge canvas say 2 metres in length. I was wondering with the array of paint brushes that come with painter what is the optimum resolution size for say a basic painting on an A4 canvas? Ive come to think 250-300 is. What do other people think. I know 100 is to small and Id say anything over 1000 would probably be ridiculous, maybe not.
The final answer really depends on a couple of things:

How you like to work.

How the image will be used.

If it's going to be printed (or if you even think it might be printed sometime in the future), the generally safe (there are exceptions) Resolution is 300 ppi.

Higher Resolution = more color information in each printed inch, thus finer detail and smoother color transitions.

If you're sure it's never going to be printed but will only be displayed on the Web, you can work at any Resolution you want (within reason, of course). If you work at a resolution higher than 72 ppi, the file will need to be saved a second time at 72 ppi for display on the Web. This is because that's about all that can be displayed on the screen anyway and there's no purpose in displaying anything at a higher resolution as it slows down loading time and also uses unnecessarily large amounts of server space.

I almost always open a new Canvas at a Resolution of 300 ppi since there's always the chance that image will be printed at some future date, or parts of that image may be used in another image that will be printed.

Another reason I work at 300 ppi is that I, too, find it much nicer to work with smaller pixels for better detail. I hate seeing big chunky pixels while I'm working, like we see at 72 ppi. If I work at 300 ppi, save my file in RIFF format, then save another version for the Web at 72 ppi, it still looks better than it would had I done the original work at 72 ppi.

The highest Resolution (ppi, or pixels per inch) I've heard anyone say they use is 600 ppi but there might be folks who use a higher resolution, though I couldn't say why.

Higher Resolution increases file size, so that's another thing to consider.

chrisdejoya
10-14-2004, 11:26 AM
I always aim for 300 dpi. I just kind of have it ingrained in my head that you never need to go any higher (correct me if I'm wrong). But for performance issues, I start all my paintings at 100 dpi, rough things out, and up the resolution as I need it. 100 dpi, 200 dpi, then 300 dpi for the tight details.

I always work at A4 by the way unless its game art. (Because my portfolio binder has A4 sleeves)

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