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View Full Version : New feauters of Ulead PI 10 in Photoshop 10?


Aze
09-29-2004, 06:42 AM
Hi ALL,

just noticed that the new version of PhotoImpact 10 has a feauter called High Dynamic Range.
"... combine up to five exposures of the same shot using auto registration. The final image spans the entire exposure range of all five images..."
More:
http://www.ulead.com/pi/features2.htm

Is there a chance to do this in PS CS also- and how? (I'm doing my first steps to PS)

Thanks

Elysian
09-29-2004, 05:21 PM
yes, use PI 10 as a photoshop plugin...

Aze
09-30-2004, 09:19 AM
Any1 else with a better suggestion?

I think the new feature is also interesting for those who have a Digital Camera. Most of
these camera supporting "Bracketing" to take a series of images with differing exposure,
contrast, saturation and color and to merge them afterward into one image using "High Dynamic Range" with PI 10.

Elysian
10-01-2004, 01:22 AM
I think the new feature is also interesting for those who have a Digital Camera. Most of

these camera supporting "Bracketing" to take a series of images with differing exposure,

contrast, saturation and color and to merge them afterward into one image using "High Dynamic Range" with PI 10.C'mon, be serious, how many times will people use that, because

a) you'll need a tripod to avoid camera movement
b) everything that is visible in the viewfinder should NOT move
c) it's costing you 5 shots (might be minor to some people)

A lot of fuzz to do something that is probably as easy to do with one shot and the advanced highlight/shadows correction in Photoshop. The results might not be as good as bracketed photographs, but it's a lot more flexible (read again point a and b).

But even without a special tool you will be able to combine bracketed photograps in photoshop and a good example can be found in the Photoshop Artistry book (Chapter 26: "Mount Rainier: Combining Bracketed Photos to Increase Dynamic Range"). I refer to a book, because there are quite some steps involved. It does make the whole process more flexible and leads to better results than the PhotoImpact approach.

You also wrote: "I'm doing my first steps to PS".
Why focus on a feature of program X when you have so much to learn about Photoshop itself?
It seems to me that you want assurance that Photoshop was the right choice after seeing all these new features in other programs am I right? Or is it that because you struggle a lot right now?

rebo
10-01-2004, 01:39 AM
Aze HDRShop can do what you want i think and its free http://www.ict.usc.edu/graphics/HDRShop/

Elysian , processing of HDR images is very important in some 3d rendering and lighting techniques.

Aze
10-01-2004, 07:02 AM
It seems to me that you want assurance that Photoshop was the right choice after seeing all these new features in other programs am I right? Or is it that because you struggle a lot right now?My wife is using PS CS for her job (only retouche and sketch...). So I decided to go with PS as well and not to buy product X to manage my digital photos, buy product y to enhance them....


But even without a special tool you will be able to combine bracketed photograps in photoshop and a good example can be found in the Photoshop Artistry book (Chapter 26: "Mount Rainier: Combining Bracketed Photos to Increase Dynamic Range"). I refer to a book, because there are quite some steps involved. It does make the whole process more flexible and leads to better results than the PhotoImpact approach.?Thanks- great idea for my next gift to my wife...

rebo,

I'll check it- thank you.

Elysian
10-01-2004, 04:30 PM
Elysian, processing of HDR images is very important in some 3d rendering and lighting techniques.Dude, where focusing in this thread on the beautiful and elegeant world of 2D and not on the boring 3D world of moving polygons.

Padre Quevedo
10-10-2004, 06:39 PM
Dude, where focusing in this thread on the beautiful and elegeant world of 2D and not on the boring 3D world of moving polygons.
Boring would be watching The Matrix on 2D.:)

Ghostscape
10-13-2004, 09:41 PM
Dude, where focusing in this thread on the beautiful and elegeant world of 2D and not on the boring 3D world of moving polygons.
Yes, Clearly Photoshop and HDRI images have NOTHING TO DO WITH 3D. Never been used in the industry, no sir.

Quite frankly, I don't see much point in making an HDRI image for 2d use, since the extra dynamic range isn't displayed on a screen or in print, because it's used as a light source in a 3d environment.

As for compositing an image with a more dynamic color and tonal range, I can see some application, but I don't recall that being what a HDRI image is used for.

Aze
04-05-2005, 07:43 AM
Yeppi, the new Adobe PS CS2 supports now HDRI:thumbsup:
http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/newfeatures.html#nf8

MasonDoran
04-05-2005, 10:13 AM
For myself...being a 2d AND 3d artist....HDRI integration is about the only thing i like in the CS2 update.

Why?

HDRI is a 32 bit image. It is a format that can store pixels with "whiter then white" color values that closely mimics the way the human eye sees light values. It does this of course by taking different exposures of the image.

This is VERY relavent in 2d images because if you take a picture and get overexposure from to much light or the opposite with underexposed shadows its nearly impossible to color correct or manipulate.

The camera lens can capture all of the detail but only with several different exposures/images. So now...u can composite your exposures in photoshop to get good dark values...without the burnt out overexposed light areas.

Of course the information is not lost on the monitor and in print in the sense that you are displaying a balanced range of values in the image.

in 3d terms...HDRI is used to perfectly capture real environment lighting for the 3d objects to appear life like in a living environment.

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