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View Full Version : Painter IX Snap-To-Path help


noelt
09-25-2004, 12:46 PM
Im using the trial version of IX and i can't seem to figure out the snap-to-path feature, i'm just trying to make circles and straight lines, my understanding was that this new feature did these things. I'm currently just selecting a pencil tool then the snap-to icon then i mess with the tolerence a little, but i get no marks or lines from the pencil, am i missing something?......Jin??

Baramin
09-25-2004, 01:29 PM
Web site says :
When you need to create a perfect curve or shape, Snap-to-Path Painting is a great time-saver. Snap-to-Path Painting makes it possible to constrain a brush stroke along a path or a shape by clicking a button or using a keyboard shortcut. With a simple click, you can now create a precise brush stroke that reflects the attributes typically found in a Corel Painter stroke, such as pressure, tilt and bearing.
From your description, you're not trying to paint on an already painted path... I don't have Painter IX, so I can't check, but try to draw a circle with the pencil tool for example and then use the snap to path to paint Oil along that line, should work.

noelt
09-25-2004, 03:56 PM
For the oil line to be perfect the pencil line has to be perfect, does the snap-to feature create a perfect shape or does it help you trace along an already perfect shape created freehand or outside the software? The impression i got was that the snap-to feature creates perfect shapes "perfect circles"

mcarp
09-25-2004, 07:18 PM
Snap to path lets you follow a path, including a perfect circle, without having the mechanical look that comes from rasterizing a shape.

So you could make a perfect circle with the shape tool, then set a brush to follow the shape, and you would have a perfect circle, but with some edge idiosyncracies that would give it a 'hand-drawn' look.

To create the shape, select the square on the tool bar, fourth button down on the right. A fly-out will give the choice of drawing a circle... much like Photoshop. Select the circle, hold down 'shift' while you draw, and there's the circle. Then you can use the snap feature in the brush to trace it.

Baramin
09-25-2004, 08:25 PM
help you trace along an already perfect shape created freehand or outside the software

that's how I understood corel web site's description (but then again, english's not my mother tongue, I might be wrong)

Karen Sperling
09-25-2004, 09:33 PM
Hi,

The snap-to feature is for snapping to a shape.

Try drawing a shape with the pen tool. Then choose a brush and either click the icon on the Property Bar next to the straight and curved line icons--or the shortcut is to hold down shift+option, mac; I assume shift+alt, windows--then paint over the shape. The new brush stroke appears in a new layer and snaps to the shape of the shape.

Hope this helps!

Karen

--
Karen Sperling
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http://www.artistrymag.com/docs/classes.html
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Jinbrown
09-25-2004, 10:26 PM
Im using the trial version of IX and i can't seem to figure out the snap-to-path feature, i'm just trying to make circles and straight lines, my understanding was that this new feature did these things. I'm currently just selecting a pencil tool then the snap-to icon then i mess with the tolerence a little, but i get no marks or lines from the pencil, am i missing something?......Jin??
Yep, you're missing something. ;)

Painter provides the features and Tools palette tools, you "do" the work using the appropriate features and Tools palette tools.

Any stroke made while the Brush tool is active will not make a path, it'll make a brushstroke based on the currently selected brush variant. (Keyword: Brush).

If you depress the Property Bar's Align to Path icon then try to paint with a Pencils variant, Painter IX will look for a path to follow. If there isn't one, no brushstroke will appear.

You'll find the information you need in Painter IX's Painter Help (Help > Help Topics).

Click the Search tab and do a search using the words:

align to path

Click the List Topics button and highlight Marking the Canvas, then click the Display button.

In the right panel, scroll down to the section named:

Aligning Brush Strokes to Paths and Shapes

Read, then practice.

Use Help > Help Topics when you want to learn something. It'll pay off, really!

Jinbrown
09-25-2004, 10:33 PM
For the oil line to be perfect the pencil line has to be perfect, does the snap-to feature create a perfect shape or does it help you trace along an already perfect shape created freehand or outside the software? The impression i got was that the snap-to feature creates perfect shapes "perfect circles" Don't rely on impressions. As we can see in this thread alone, that leads to confusion.

In the context of using Painter IX's Align to Path feature, whether or not a pencil brushstroke is "perfect" has nothing at all to do with another brushstroke (i.e. "oil line") being either "perfect" or the same as the pencil brushstroke.

Again, nothing in Painter "does" things for us. It provides Tools palette tools and features, then we "do" the work to make what we want happen.

Read my previous message to see that the "perfect" shape is not created by using the "snap to path" feature.. (the appropriate terminology in Painter IX is Align to Path button).

It's created by combining the use of two Tools palette tools and the Property Bar's Align to Path button.

The Align to Path button helps us to create brushstrokes that follow a more perfect line than most of us could probably paint freehand.

noelt
09-26-2004, 04:38 AM
Don't get my intentions wrong, i know how to get the results i want already and i'm willing to WORK to get better, it's just i don't see the "time saving" over just scanning a finished drawing (after using rulers and templete circle guides) into the computer then coloring it or just simply undoing your brush stroke(say oil brush) until it looks good. The ad for painter IX shows a red sports car (very well drawn i must say) done using the new snap-to-feature, i need to know how the production of this car was made easier by painter IX. Right now i can do a drawing (almost) like this red car (with much effort i must admit) but it's mostly done OUTSIDE the software and the majority of the work is cleanup done creating "perfect" lines using rulers and templates....then scanning, HOW CAN PAINTER IX SAVE ME TIME OVER THIS PROCESS. The ad says "perfect shapes"but really it's about creating "perfect"paths (to snap to) that are as good as(and quicker than) what you would get using rulers and templates outside the software.
Once again i'm not lazy just trying to get better,save time and figure out if i need to buy IX or not, the snap to feature is the thing i was most excited about,......Jin??

mcarp
09-26-2004, 04:54 PM
Let's say you've scanned a pencil sketch of a car into your computer.

You have some short lines, such as the side view mirrors, which you can paint freehand without much trouble.

But making the long sweeping curve of the fender line, or getting the ovals of the headlights right, is more difficult. This is where the snap to path comes in. You draw a path along the fender curve. If you have to, you can fine-tune by adjusting the points on the curve. Then you can paint a line that will follow that curve. No repeated undos, no rotating the canvas to get a better angle for your hand.

I think you would get frustrated pretty quickly, though, trying to use Painter as a substitute for a drawer full of french curves and oval templates. There is software that can replace those, but Painter isn't it. That's more in the realm of CAD drawing.

Jinbrown
09-26-2004, 08:03 PM
No need to shout. :)

Learn how to use the Align to Path feature, practice with it on a few different projects, then decide for yourself which method is most efficient... for your work.

No one can tell you that. We can only tell you what we prefer, and what we prefer in specific situations.

As for me, I can imagine finding either method most efficient, depending on the task at hand.

For something fairly simple (or even something complex), and if I could get the kinds of brushstrokes I wanted, I might use the Align to Path feature.

For a complex drawing and/or drawing and inking, since I have years of experience working with pencils and inking them for print work, I might easily prefer to do it traditionally, scan, then color in Painter.

There are way too many variables considering the many kinds of art Painter users are creating and the many ways each user prefers to work, to give a simple answer.

noelt
09-27-2004, 02:59 AM
Thanks for the help everyone, means a lot :)))

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