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exclaim
09-20-2004, 05:55 PM
Just wondering what blenders and brushes the korean artist tae hyung kim uses. Thanks ^^.

Lunatique
09-23-2004, 12:10 PM
It doesn't really matter if you know what brushes he uses. Reality is, you can mimic the look exactly if you understand how/why he paints the way he does. If you don't have that understanding, even if he gave you his brushes, you still would not be able to paint the way he does.

smoothoperator
09-23-2004, 03:10 PM
Can you post his website? Never heard of him.

+smooth+

ambient-whisper
09-26-2004, 07:07 PM
he does stuff like this.

http://marzana.eowyn.nu/nitty/

http://naimoka.com/arts2/kim/mc/perso/tristan.jpg

delunchen
09-29-2004, 05:33 PM
Ya i feel that understanding "how" he does that is much better then "what" he use. It is the same theory of different artists using the same brush but producing different style

Nolita
10-08-2004, 05:01 PM
Maybe you could try reading Luna's FAQ on his site. It sort of explains in detail why the specific brushes don't matter. I don't think he was intentionally being dismissive or anything like that.

Quickly paraphrasing what he says, the artist's painting isn't the result of any specific brushes(of course I dare Luna to try and go an entire week to go without his pallette knives http://cgtalk.com/images/smilies/wink.gif) but rather is the result of years of study and practice.

Basically I would really like it if you just tried to develope your own style and technique of painting, it prevents stagnation, and nothing's worse than stagnating, well, not counting cancer, or the black plague or something equally deadlyhttp://cgtalk.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

I just wanted to offer some words of encouragement, and I'm not trying to offend anyone, by bumping this thread back to the top, or stepping on toes. Maybe you didn't think Luna was being dismissive at all. If you've been to his site, then obviously you know he wasn't.

The funny thing is, this question gets asked in the forums a lot. A whole lot. The name of the artist changes from time to time, someone wants to paint like Anry, while someone else wants to paint like Linda B. The answer will be the same no matter who the artist is.

the_ARTS
01-10-2005, 02:36 PM
i was looking around and found this site.
http://keechul.co.nr/misc/htktut/htk.htm

-the_ARTS-

rI-n
01-31-2005, 01:36 AM
i've looked at the tutorial posted above and i personally can't get it to work. in painter 8 the watercolor doesn't have "simple water", the digital watercolor does...however when i try to use it in the way they describe it just doesn't work. i don't know what opacity they use but if i put one layer down then try to go over it to blend and build it simply doesn't work. either it doesn't blend or the next time i try to paint nothing shows up. i've messed with the opacity and setting but reguardless of what i try nothing...

i understand the technique and i do my painting using the acrylic and i can get decent results, but blending in painter seems really difficult at times. know the technique in this case would really help my understanding of another way to do things and expand my knowledge. who ever said copying a technique is missing out...the way to begin or advace more quickly is to learn as many techniques as possible and build on them.

i even have the new hyung tae kim book, "oxide 2" and it has a tutorial but no text...can't see the setting because the pictures are small. if anyone has more details on how to get this to work properly please let me know.

ryan

Jinbrown
01-31-2005, 09:24 AM
ryan,

It's important to understand that Painter 6 and earlier version Water Colors used the old Water Color technology, very simple compared to the Painter 7 and later version Water Color/Watercolor technology which is much more complex and the brush variants only work on Water Color Layers.

There are clues to find in most older Painter version tutorials but you'll need to know enough about Painter versions to notice them and figure out what to do and/or even if the tutorial will work at all in your Painter version.

For instance, if you're using Painter 7 and reading a Painter 6 or earlier version tutorial that uses Water Colors, you're not going to get anything like the same results and the instructions will be very confusing.

If you're using Painter 8 or Painter IX with the same tutorial, you'll be in better shape because at least Painter 8 has Digital Water Colors and Painter IX has Digital Watercolors both of which are very similar to the Painter 6 and earlier version Water Colors. Still, the instructions will be confusing because the interface has changed, there are different commands, and Digital Water Colors/Digital Watercolors work on both the Canvas and on Layers unlike Painter 6 and earlier versions where Water Colors only worked at the Canvas level, on the invisible Wet Layer.

The tutorial linked in the message above yours was obviously written for an old Painter version. The first way I can tell is that the author says at the command "Canvas > Canvas Dry" must be used in order to use the "color picker" to pick colors.

First, there is no such command in any version from Painter 5 to Painter IX, the correct main menu commands to dry Water Color or Watercolor paint, depending on the version are:

Painter 5: Canvas > Dry

Painter 6: Canvas > Dry

Painter 7: None - Instead use Layers section menu > Dry Water Color Layer

Painter 8: Layers > Dry Water Color Layer

Painter IX: Layers > Dry Watercolor Layer

The correct main menu commands to dry Painter 8 Digital Water Color or Painter IX Digital Watercolor are:

Painter 8: Layers > Dry Digital Water Color

Painter IX: Layers > Dry Digital Watercolor

In Painter 6, Painter 7, Painter 8 and Painter IX it is not true that the paint has to be dried before using the Dropper tool to pick colors from the brushstrokes.

Color can be picked from wet paint, either Water Color in Painter 6, 7, and 8, Watercolor in Painter IX, Digital Water Color in Painter 8, or Digital Watercolor in Painter IX.

The only version I have installed that doesn't allow us to pick color from wet Water Color paint is Painter 5. If we attempt to pick color from wet Water Color paint in Painter 5, instead the Canvas color is picked since wet Water Color paint in Painter 6 and earlier version remains on the invisible Wet Layer and the Dropper tool ignores the wet paint.

Even if it were a case of incorrect Painter terminology for the language in which the tutorial is written (of which there is plenty in this tutorial no matter what Painter version was used providing it was for any Painter version from Painter 5 through Painter IX), we'd be pretty sure the author used either Painter 6 or earlier version Water Colors, Painter 8 Digital Water Colors, or Painter IX Digital Watercolors.

The reason I say this is that there is no Simple Water brush variant or Eraser Wet brush variant in the Painter 7 Water Color, Painter 8 Water Color, or Painter IX Watercolor brush categories. The closest variant names to Simple Water and Wet Eraser in these later Painter versions' Water Color/Watercolor brush categories are Simple Round Wash and Eraser Wet (and, again, Water Colors/Watercolors in these later versions don't work the same or look the same as earlier version Water Colors).

Where the author says he starts out with simple shading and his brush technique is medium pressure on the darkest part of the shadow, lighter pressure shading to do a rough blend of shadow and mid tone colors, it seems he has Color Expression set to Pressure and uses a continuous brushstroke rather than picking it up and laying color over color. It could also be that he first paints the lighter areas, then paints new brushstrokes with darker colors, blending the darker color into the lighter color using very light pressure.

When he says he uses multiple passes to darken the shadows and lighten the highlights, it seems he's lifted the pen and painted over existing color to get his "buildup" effect for darkening, though it could be that he painted continuously passing over existing paint in the same brushstroke and in that way adding more color for the "buildup" effect. That buildup would occur using the same color over existing color either way. However, I would think he must have used a lighter color to paint highlights over existing color. If not a lighter value of the same color, with Painter 6 Water Colors, Painter 8 Digital Water Colors, or Painter IX Digital Watercolors, you could set Color Expression to Pressure and for highlights and check the Invert box so when you apply more pressure the color is lighter. Then, to go back to painting mid tones and shadows, uncheck the Invert box so when you apply more pressure the paint is darker.

Where the author says to move on to the torso, start with flats, but make sure you don't run into the skin.... since you're probably using Painter 8 or Painter IX, I'd suggest painting the skin on one Layer and the torso on another Layer which you can do using Digital Water Colors (Painter 8) or Digital Watercolors (Painter IX). Then you don't have to worry about accidentally painting on the skin. Even if you do paint over the skin, your torso will be on a separate Layer and you can erase any slop over paint.

I'm not going to explain the entire tutorial, but hope this will give you enough information to make it a little easier getting started.

Clearly it would help if people writing Painter tutorials specified the Painter version used when writing the tutorial and used the terminology we see on that Painter version's interface.

So you won't wonder what I mean by incorrect terminology for a tutorial written in English and presumably used by people using the English version of Painter, just in the first two paragraphs of the tutorial are the author's use of:

tool - when he means brush category (the only "tool" used when doing pixel based drawing or painting in Painter is the Brush tool found in the Tools palette)

watercolor brush set to Simple Water or as wet eraser - when he means the Water Color brush category's Simple Water brush variant or Wet Eraser brush variant

water tool - when he means the Water Color brush category or Water Color brush variants collectively

"color picker" - when he means the Dropper tool

Canvas > Dry Canvas - where he means whichever command fits the Painter version he's using, listed above for versions Painter 5 through Painter IX


Good luck!

vectro
03-13-2005, 04:25 PM
Try looking through kis paintings and understand them:
Here this is an Ultimate SITE for HYUNG TAE KIMS work
http://hyung-taekim.org/index.php

tjnyc
03-20-2005, 03:57 AM
You can check out some of his tutorials in the comic book Megacity 909 or something like that from studio ice. His tutorial is in issue 2-5.

www.studioice.com (http://www.studioice.com)



Cheers,

tjnyc
03-29-2005, 07:56 PM
I just his Oxide 2 artbook from animebooks.com. Excellent edition, much better than his first Oxide book. The book is all art, only 1 page has written text.


Cheers,

rdaly
03-30-2005, 05:28 AM
The guy's linework is absolutely awesome, he's definitely one of the better Korean artists out there. I love his work and think he should be gaining more attention/should be working more to get said attention!! :D

kilpatrick
06-17-2005, 10:29 AM
Mind if I revive this thread just to ask a question?

Does Hyung Tae Kim use a Graphire or an Intuos for his works?

ambient-whisper
06-17-2005, 11:36 AM
brain and hand combo version 3.5.013.
lower models arent good enough.

Calintz
07-18-2005, 07:33 AM
The links seem to be dead now, does anyone know if theres any other way of seeing these tutorials on hyung tae kim? i really would like to kno what brushes he actually uses cos im having no luck using the painter 9 brushes, they in no way look even the slightest like hyung tae kims.

BruceAzevedo
07-19-2005, 05:49 PM
Calintz,the only tutorial that I've found by Hyung Tae Kim is this one at http://www.guumedia.com/airlock/features/htk-runaway/1.asp ,but he doesn't say more than explain his path B4 getting to Painter.
On the other hand,U can check this adress at http://membres.lycos.fr/ultimatrix/ for a Painter 6 Tutorial by Arnold Tsang
Hope it helps.

pushav
07-19-2005, 08:23 PM
I have tutorials made by him. 3 of them.

He has some in a comic called megacity 808 by studio ice. Check your local comic retailer.
The tutorials do not really help. They are more of a more general "this is what I do" type of tutorial. (meaning no brush settings and no real detail expainations.)

He uses water color brush to do flats.
In his newer works I think that he uses painter 9 at his job and painter 6 at home.

Jinbrown
07-20-2005, 04:48 AM
Hi,

You guys are chasing after rainbows' ends. If the artist is using Painter 6 Water Color variants and also using Painter IX, my strong hunch is that he's using Painter IX Digital Watercolor variants.

The Water Color variants in Painter 6 were very simple and fairly easy to use.

Look for the simpler Painter IX Digital Watercolor variants and you have something almost the same, but better. If you were to Import Painter 6 Water Colors into Painter IX, you'd find they work basically the same way. To begin with, they'd both use the Digital Wet Method (in the Brush Controls' General palette, one of the most basic brush settings).

The rainbow I refer to is this hero syndrome that seems to make a lot of people think if they find the magic sword (or brush) at the end of that rainbow (the artist you're chasing) everything will suddenly be solved and you'll suddenly be able to paint like he does.

The magic sword thing is what Lunatique so often trys to tell you about. What makes the painting is not the brush. It's how the artist uses it along with all the other elements that go into creating good art, compositon, color, lighting, perspective.... a brush can't do all that for you, nor can it dance across the canvas on its own, though it may be more or less a graceful dancer in the hands of a practiced artist.

Again, Painter 6 Water Colors are very simple brush variants. I've peeked at what I assume is some of this artist's work and, frankly, it appears that it could have been done with several Painter brush types. Pastels, for instance, are often used to simulate watecolor, believe it or not!

Anyway, try some of the plain old simple and lovely Digital Watercolor variants and just practice until you have the control you need. Whatever brush variant you use, you'll still need to choose the colors, make brush control adjustments for Size, Opacity, Pressure Expression (or not) and so on. The rest is your own practice, hard work, and a pinch of talent.

Create your own magic sword!


Happy painting!

Calintz
08-19-2005, 07:29 PM
thx for the link shinobi, and thx for telling me that pushav, cos i was thinking bout getting those books for the tutorials, but if they arent very helpful....

Jinbrown, its not that im looking for this special fantastic brush which will make me an amazing painter overnight. The problem is i kno how to colour, but its the software (in this case painter) thats letting me down. I just cant grasp it. All the brushes i try using on painter just look so rubbish when i try painting with them, and i dont understand why. So what i wanted to know was what kind of tool he uses (watercolours, digital watercolours, acrylics etc) and which brush he uses. In photoshop i can do so much better because i have a fair knowledge of how to use it. At the moment i paint in photoshop, but i would really love to explore and hopefully move over to painter eventually because i feel it has alot more potential, however all the tutorials i find simply deal with how to draw, not the settings involved.

Jinbrown
08-20-2005, 12:45 AM
Hi Calintz,

I understand, and you'll find me defending artists who want to know what brush another artist used to get a particular effect.

The truth is that:




Knowing what brush variant was used by another artist will not ensure getting the same effect.
Knowing something about what brush variant (or brush variants) another artist used does help at least in the beginning when a person is brand new to Painter, if for no other reason than it gives some kind of reassurance and an example of what can be done using a particular brush variant or set of brush variants.
Nothing will replace reading, testing and experimentation, practice, and understanding of Painter's brush controls, Paper texture interaction, Layers, and whatever else can affect the final result.

Here are some things that should give you a boost understanding Painter's older version Water Colors and the Painter 8 and Painter IX Digital Watercolors (the latter is just the more advanced version of the older versions' Water Colors). I've also included a link to information about Painter 7, Painter 8, and Painter IX Water Color/Watercolor brush variants which are quite different from the older version Water Color and Painter 8/Painter IX Digital Water Color/Watercolor brush variants.

I'd suggest reading these in order, beginning with John Derry's Visual Guides that will give you an overall understanding of how these brush variants and the related painting systems work.

John Derry's Visual Guide to Painter 8 Digital Water Color (called Digital Watercolor in Painter IX) (http://www.corel.com/content/pdf/painter8/tutorials/Digital_Water_Color.pdf)

A very important improvement in Painter IX Digital Watercolors that is different from what you'll read in John Derry's Visual Guide:



Painter IX wet Digital Watercolor paint now remains when when the image is saved, closed, and reopened as long as it's saved in Painter's native RIFF format. It can now be dried only when the artist is ready to have it dried, though saving the image in PSD or other non-Painter RIFF formats will also dry wet Digital Watercolor paint.

Since John mentions the Water Color brush category in his Digital Water Color Visual Guide, I'll also include a link to his Painter 8 Visual Guide to Water Color:

John Derry's Visual Guide to Painter 8 Water Color (http://www.corel.com/content/pdf/painter8/tutorials/Water_Color.pdf)

Beginning with Painter 7, Water Color (called Watercolor in Painter IX) uses a completely new technology, different from the Painter 6 and earlier version Water Color which is (as mentioned above) beginning with Painter 8 Digital Water Color (called Digital Watercolor in Painter IX). The newer Water Color/Watercolor painting system and brush technology is more true to traditional watercolor behavior and requires more understanding and practice to get desired results than either the older version Water Color or Painter 7, 8, and IX Water Color/Watercolor which are simpler and, again, easier to use.

More Digital Water Color/Digital Watercolor Tutorials:

Cher Threinen-Pendarvis' Painter 8 Tutorial, Coloring a Drawing Using Digital Water Color (http://www.corel.com/content/pdf/painter8/tutorials/Painter8_Tutor3cc_DWC.pdf)

Carol Laing's Corel Painter 8 Tutorial, The New Digital Watercolor (http://www.corel.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=Corel2/Products/Content&pid=1047022702185&cid=1047023187027)

Don Seegmiller's Tutorial, Painting a Face with Digital Watercolor in Corel Painter IX (http://www.corel.com/painterix/training/tutorial_watercolor.html)

zerae
12-02-2005, 09:18 PM
To anyone interested there is a person selling a lot of Hyung Tae kim material on ebay there's even a making of DVD that shows him painting with Painter 6.

Chromo48
12-03-2005, 06:48 AM
Honestly, the kind of work he does is pretty basic painting and can easily be done in photoshop with the paintbrush. He's one hell of a painter in the sense that he's great with his color choices and defining forms. Other than that, he's a mediocre draftsman who needs to really work on his anotomy... especially the lower portions of bodies. His painting style is very straightforward though, and isn't anything magical. But don't get me wrong... I'm a big fan, just keeping it real.

Lunatique
12-04-2005, 03:56 AM
Honestly, the kind of work he does is pretty basic painting and can easily be done in photoshop with the paintbrush. He's one hell of a painter in the sense that he's great with his color choices and defining forms. Other than that, he's a mediocre draftsman who needs to really work on his anotomy... especially the lower portions of bodies. His painting style is very straightforward though, and isn't anything magical. But don't get me wrong... I'm a big fan, just keeping it real.

Quoted for agreement. I think he's got great style, but his work suffers a bit from "style over substance." If you really look at his designs (his job is character concept artist), although they are colorful and lively, with interesting unconventional approaches, some of it borders on ridiculously silly (huge, heavy hair deco weights on petite females, for example, or awkward and uncomfortable poses for no reason other than the exploitation of the human form). I personally prefer character concepts that have the characters look very natural, in poses we're likely to see in real life, and with design elements that are not only atractive, but also highly practical. That to me, is what good design should encompass. I feel that when a concept artist goes nuts with fancy designs that are highly impractical, they are showing a lack of restraint, and needs to rethink their responsibilities as a concept artist. Of course, this is just my personal preference--if Kim's boss is tickled pink by his work, he's done his job and earned his paycheck. He's also got legions of rabid fans around the world, so who cares what I think. :D

CIRE
12-05-2005, 10:41 AM
Finally, someone has said something about his lack of anatomical understanding in the lower regions of the body, mainly the legs. If it were not for his brilliant use of painters digital watercolor brushes, there would be a lot more people saying that he needs to look at a Hogarth or Bridgman book.

whiteweazel
05-01-2006, 01:38 AM
Wow...

Personally, I really like his proportions. I'm sure he could draw typical human forms if he wanted to. I mean, he's not a fine artist, what he draws doesn't have to relate to the real world.

I'm drawing 9-11 head women, and, obviously the proportions are not "real". That doesn't mean I couldn't draw a 7 1/2 head woman if I tried, but these are the proportions I like, and I am hardly as good at drawing as Hyung Tae Kim.

Not to be rude, but art is open to a lot of things and interpretations. I'm suprised how judgemental some of the people are here. If people didn't experiment, nothing new would come about. I think he found something he likes and sticks with it.

Nemes
05-04-2006, 09:52 PM
My two pence worth...

Painter: From what I can gather [as I am also new to digital art] the old style watercolour brush’s for painter were really well liked, and then they messed up rather badly apparently in 7,8 version UNTIL finally now with IX and IX.5 they managed to get the old but realist feel of watercolour brush work back with the new engine [digital watercolour]

Peoples brush choices: I don't think much more could be said than what has already been said by people more experienced than I on this subject, I guess what I would add is this, people will no doubts come to fond brush choices over a longish time period after developing their own STYLES and coming to the conclusions that certain choices help them achieve their unique style - so I guess what I’m trying to say is, digital art is such a medium of talent and development of talent, that there is really only one thing that can get you where you want to go, and that's practice, have a go, fall down and get back up again and try again etc.

Tae hyung:

As for Tae I think with his style, the WHOLE IDEA BEHIND HIS STYLE IS stylised character design, and the very anatomically exaggerated and stylised forms he is famous for is exactly what he is supposed to be doing because that is what is getting him paid at the end of the month :)

As with all ART it's truly in the eye of the beholder, some artists appeal to a wide audience, others not so....

Me personally, I can and do appreciate his style, and I can enjoy his works...

I guess because that MARKET is so flooded with -SAME TYPE- artists producing highly similar material, you just have to be really OUT THERE and above the norm in your characterisation and stylisation, which is probably why he is getting the ££££$$$$$ and the hordes of fans :)

Nemes

Jinbrown
05-05-2006, 02:51 AM
My two pence worth...

Painter: From what I can gather [as I am also new to digital art] the old style watercolour brush’s for painter were really well liked, and then they messed up rather badly apparently in 7,8 version UNTIL finally now with IX and IX.5 they managed to get the old but realist feel of watercolour brush work back with the new engine [digital watercolour]


In Painter 7, the new Water Color brush technology was introduced, to better simulate traditional watercolor painting. The new WC technology was more complex and did not produce the simpler look of Painter 6 and earlier version Water Color brush variants. The Painter 7 Water Color variants use Method: Wet.

In Painter 8, while the new Water Color brush category and new technology remained, the "new" Digital Water Color brush category was introduced. I put the word "new" in quotes since it's not completely new. The Painter 8 DWC brush category included all of the Water Color brush variants in the default Painter 6 brush library's Water Color brush category, plus quite a few new brush variants. Digital Water Color (Painter 8) or Digital Watercolor (Painter IX) uses Method: Digital Wet. For people who own Painter 6, when the default Painter 6 brush library is Imported into Painter 8 or Painter IX, the Water Color/Watercolor brush variants' Method is changed to Digital Wet.
Painter IX also includes the Watercolor brush category (uses Method: Wet) and Digital Watercolor brush category (uses Method: Digital Wet). Both have been improved but basically produce the same looks as in Painter 8. As with Painter 8, the Painter IX Watercolor brush category includes all of the Painter 6 Water Color brush variants plus quite a few new brush variants.

If you Load the Painter 6 Watercolor brush library from the Painter IX CD, you'll find the brush variants work like the Painter 7 Water Color, Painter 8 Water Color, and Painter IX Watercolor brush variants because they use Method: Wet (the new Water Color/Watercolor brush technology).
With either Painter 8 or Painter IX, there's no need to Import Painter 6 Water Color brush variants or load the Painter 6 Watercolor brush library from the Painter IX CD as, again, the Painter 6 Water Color brush variants are already present in the Painter 8 Digital Water Color and Painter IX Digital Watercolor brush categories.

Chromo48
07-04-2006, 03:11 AM
Wow...

Personally, I really like his proportions. I'm sure he could draw typical human forms if he wanted to. I mean, he's not a fine artist, what he draws doesn't have to relate to the real world.

I'm drawing 9-11 head women, and, obviously the proportions are not "real". That doesn't mean I couldn't draw a 7 1/2 head woman if I tried, but these are the proportions I like, and I am hardly as good at drawing as Hyung Tae Kim.

Not to be rude, but art is open to a lot of things and interpretations. I'm suprised how judgemental some of the people are here. If people didn't experiment, nothing new would come about. I think he found something he likes and sticks with it.

Jesus man... you are your own worst enemy with a comment like that. I agree with you that his proportions are fun and interesting. I too draw exaggerated proportions, I find realistic boring and I like Kim's proportions. But that has nothing to do with his incorrect anatomy on some of his characters. And it also has nothing to do with being a fine artist. Dali is a "fine artist", are his proportions always realistic? Picasso? Maybe the word you were looking for was "realism" or "representational"?

And you're right, art is open to alot of things, one of the most important is criticism. And criticism by definition means an evaluation. I was simply evaluating Mr. Kim's public artwork based on my trained eye. But you really don't even need to know much about anatomy to spot some of the flaws in his work, it's common sense. I could understand if it was consistent, but it's not. It's only here and there, and it's almost always the legs and usually in areas that require foreshortening. And it CERTAINLY ISN'T what makes his art so appealing. If Mr. Kim could nail down his anatomy, his crazy poses would look even cooler and things would look much more appealing... I guarantee it, it's a law of nature, trust me.

Anywho, I'm gonna throw a visual up here, if you wanna call this a style choice, go right ahead and do so. But... haha, yeah that's different alright.
http://www.bobrivard.com/posted/natalie_min.jpg

Lunatique
07-04-2006, 07:41 PM
That piece is actually not that bad. I think this one is a more severe:

http://hyung-taekim.org/albums/userpics/10001/oxide2_31.jpg

This piece is exactly what I meant about style over substance. It's the symptom of over self-indulgence with no restraint. Of course not all of pieces get this extreme, but in his latest artbook (Oxide 2), it's fairly obvious that he's distorting the figure more and more--thus leading to awkward images like this one. If he doesn't show some restraint soon, it'll only get worse.

I definitely respect him as an artist, but that doesn't mean I can't be constructively critical as well. We can all be respectfully critical of the artists we admire--there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. It's only questionable if people make snyde and crude remarks.

Chromo48
07-05-2006, 06:12 AM
Hey Lunatique, did you mean to post a picture? There's nothing there. But you're right, there are certainly others that display much of the same.

Anyway, I would really hate to turn this into a "rip fest" for Kim's artwork, he really is one of my favorite manga-style artists, and there are definitely a ton of good things in his art. Although, with all the praise and fame he gets, this may set the balance. I just think it's silly how fans can fall so head over heels for an artist so badly that it blinds them to basic, fundamental flaws. Love is blind right? Well hopefully a few people will at least heed some of the tips here (entire thread) and try to open their eyes a bit.

Lunatique
07-05-2006, 09:28 PM
http://hyung-taekim.org/albums/userpics/10001/oxide2_31.jpg

That's what I linked to, but I guess it didn't show up?

Kim certainly is very talented and very good at certain things.

Knilblink
07-06-2006, 11:36 PM
The piece that Chromo48 linked isn't awful all over, but I'm guessing he was referring to her right arm. Can any of your arms twist like that? :eek: I'm sure there are plenty of other issues and most can probably be written off to style, but that arm is glaring.

Although, I'm sure you can find errors in any artists' work if you're given a large enough sampling. I saw a Rembrandt sketch in Chicago of a passionate couple, he mistakenly sketched an extra arm into the piece. :scream:

Chromo48
07-07-2006, 02:00 AM
The piece that Chromo48 linked isn't awful all over, but I'm guessing he was referring to her right arm. Can any of your arms twist like that? :eek: I'm sure there are plenty of other issues and most can probably be written off to style, but that arm is glaring.

Although, I'm sure you can find errors in any artists' work if you're given a large enough sampling. I saw a Rembrandt sketch in Chicago of a passionate couple, he mistakenly sketched an extra arm into the piece. :scream:

True, the piece isn't horrible all over, but the error you're talking about with the arm isn't as bad as the leg in my opinion. Her right leg (your left) is just so horribly mangled, it can't even be called a leg. That is not style, that's poor anatomy. It's the kind of stuff you see in a novices work. But some hard core fans would rather refer to it as a style choice. You're right about the arm though, it looks like it's coming out of her head.

All I wanted was to post this to prove a point and just show people where the flaws are. We've all got flaws in our work, no doubt about that. And like Knilblink illustrated with Rembrandt, even the best of the best have flaws. It's just that it's ridiculous how people are basically willing to look the other way because they so deeply admire another aspect of the artists work, I really think it's unhealthy.

killermachine
01-30-2007, 05:56 AM
i hadnt seen his flawed works til i was on this thread.i guess everyone lacks someplace where he needs to improve.v all want to improve dont we.in any case we dont have to take his flaws,only learn what makes his work so appealing.i hope someone has already told him bout his anatomy so that he revises it.he is a gr8 artist no doubt on that

Pinoy McGee
02-02-2007, 01:37 AM
i hope someone has already told him bout his anatomy so that he revises it.he is a gr8 artist no doubt on that

I disagree.

Warped anatomy is part of his style and of the genre (hakuto no ken anyone?). Personally I prefer he stays true to his style and vision than pretend to be another 9 heads high artist like many of us. Unrealistic anatomy is not stopping his broad appeal and commercial success so why change it (and bring him down to the level of lesser artists).

And for anybody else who's dying for the brushes...the THK look is really more than that. Check his step-by-step in his artbooks and you'll see that post-editing his images plays a big role in the final product than just simplying relying on his painting tools.

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