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Kansai
09-04-2004, 04:51 AM
Hey all I have been wondering this for a long time. I am a tradtional 2d artist/concept artist. I have no experience in 2d animation but i love it and feel i could teach myself how to animate with enough practice.

Which brings me to my first question flipping. I have watched the making of many disney movie's pixar etc. And I watch how there animators flip to produce and animation. My question to the experienced in these forms. Is how do I start this my materials to help me learn how to animate tons of 8x11 copy paper and a hole punch. I cant afford a light table with the rings on the bottom like professional animators have. Is it possible for me to do some simple animations with the copy paper alone.
My problem is how do i start the initial flipping with my stack of 8x11 copy paper do i start frame one on the last page then trace over and do frame 2. Or in better words from bottom to top or from the top page to the bottom.

I hope this makes sense. It would be great if someone can point me into a direction to where i can make a cheap animation light table

Demilliac
09-04-2004, 08:37 AM
This link as been posted not so long time ago.

http://www.animationbureau.com/tips/builddisk.html

I'm not so aware about 2d animation but I've always seen animator go from bottom to top page. So your last draw is always on top and you don't have to pin all your old pages for drawing it.
Good luck to you.

voodoofactory
09-04-2004, 09:06 AM
- Most animation students make their own lighttable. You just get yourself a plate of opale acrylic(or polycarbonate) glas, some plywood, a tl-lightbar and a pegbar; Bob's your uncle, Mary's your aunt: You've got yourself a lighttable!
- There are basically two animations methods; Straightforward en pose-2-pose. Straightforward means that the last fase you made is on top. You just make the fases in their chronological order (1,2,3,4,5,6, etc.). The method that is most used in the commercial world is the pose-2-pose method. With this method, you first draw all the extremes of the movement you want to make. After you've made you're extremes you start 'filling in' the fases between the extremes (say you have an animation of 6 fases; 1,6, 3,4,2,5)

Lastly I'd like to recommend some reading material:
-The Animation Book: A Complete Guide to Animated Filmmaking--From Flip-Books to Sound Cartoons to 3-D Animation (http://www.abc.nl/search/detailed.php?isbn=0517886022&valuta=$&subject=Animation&recom=all)
Laybourne, Kit|12/1998|EUR 29.69
ISBN: 0517886022|US Edition|Trade Paperback

The Animator's Survival Kit: A Manual of Methods, Principles, and Formulas for Classical, Computer, Games, Stop Motion, and Internet Animators (http://www.abc.nl/search/detailed.php?isbn=0571202284&valuta=$&subject=Animation&recom=all)
Williams, Richard|01/2002|EUR 35.10
ISBN: 0571202284|US Edition|Trade Paperback


And if you really want to dive into animation, I suggest you go to an Art School.

Kansai
09-04-2004, 10:15 PM
Hey all thanx for the replies. I am going to give it a try. Hopefully it will work out and I will post the results.Just interested in giving 2-d animation a try after seeing one of the memebers websites here on the forums http://www.rvanim.com/ very insperational work and he did it all himself. I was baffled!!

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