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montdom
08-07-2002, 06:42 PM
I don't know if there's another thread about this already, but I'm trying to find out the basics of multi-pass rendering. how is it best to manage files? How do you composite them together again?

Thanks for any advice.:buttrock:

Atyss
08-07-2002, 10:22 PM
It's explained in the manuals. Check out the FX section in the Rendering manual.


Hope this helps
Salutations - Cheers
Bernard Lebel

wmendez
08-08-2002, 04:22 AM
As Atyss said manuals are your first choice. 3D World Issue 27 has a Video Tutorial on rendering passes in XSI as well.

montdom
08-08-2002, 03:08 PM
It's just that this type of system is beyond what I've got into before, so trying to learn it seems like trying to eat a cake in one bite.

I'm sifting through tutorials and the like now.

Atyss
08-08-2002, 10:40 PM
Well, like you said it's quite a big cake. But once you understand the concept, it's not that big anymore.

To summarize, passes are constitued of 3 main functions: passes, partitions, and overrides.

Passes: These will allow you to render specific images that will be used for compositing. I guess you already know what it is.

Partitions: They are the main components of a pass. The paritition is the system that allows to apply custom property to certain objects, and not to other objects. For example, if you have 2 object partitions, you can apply a material to one, and leave the other as is. All the object that you put in the partition with the material will inherit this material, but those in the other partition will remain untouched.

Overrides: They are used to disable or change specific properties of the objects in the partition. For example, if you want to disable all the reflections for the objects in a given partition, you will add an override to the partition, and add a checkbox in this override. When this checkbox is checked, reflections are rendered. When it's not checked, reflections are not rendered.

The great thing about partitions and overrides is that you can build entire render trees on them. For example, you can put an override on a partition that will change the diffuse properties of the members. You can build a render tree with textures and nodes onto this override, so all the object's diffuse property inherit this render tree.


Hope this helps
Salutations - Cheers
Bernard Lebel

montdom
08-09-2002, 08:49 PM
Thanks. Hopefully it won't be long before I master this.

Atyss
08-09-2002, 11:04 PM
Well, if it can help, it took me just a couple of hours to get it. When you understand the concept, it's pretty easy. The most common types of passes are available with just a click. The tutorial that Will pointed you to is excellent, it will teach exactly what I said. You should really get this 3D World issue, just for this 1-hour tutorial.


Salutations - Cheers
Bernard Lebel

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