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capone_adam
07-30-2004, 03:47 PM
I'm about to start looking into animation using xsi. I looked at the many many tutorials on edharriss.com but there was only ONE which actually isn't about setting it up...and that didn't work. I am actually wanting to simply learn how to animate a biped skeleton which comes with xsi as I am wanting to quickly see if I can make a good rig do complex moves...if I can't animate this theres no way I will be able to animate a rig of my own. Is there any tutorials on using the animation editor?

I don't have any official tutorials on my version, anyone know where I could download them from?

thanks

SheepFactory
07-30-2004, 06:06 PM
If you are new to animation i wouldnt touch biped animation for 3 months at least. Do some bouncing balls and simple suff to teach you the basics first.

You dont need a tutorial for the anim editor , just read the manual.

GavinG
07-30-2004, 07:08 PM
Actually, imo, if you're a complete newbie to animation in general I wouldn't even touch 3d yet...I'd read and practice the basics (much like sheep said). If you have the ground work laid out and you know the principles of animation, applying that to any 3D package will be much MUCH easier.

-Gav

CoolDuck_HRO
08-02-2004, 12:02 AM
Here are some basic animation tutorials if you need them:

http://www.freetoon.com/prestonblair/intro/frame.html
http://www.anticz.com/learn.htm
http://www.siggraph.org/education/materials/HyperGraph/animation/character_animation/principles/lasseter_s94.htm

Good luck with your learning!

Pilchard
08-03-2004, 04:00 PM
yeah, learning animation the art form and using a 3D package are two seperate things, best learnt in that order. You can teach an animator to use a 3D package quickly, but can't teach a maya techie good timing, weighting and so forth half as quick. If you do go into it I'd stick to simple things first, like the good old bouncing ball!

Good luck dude!

Jonathan
08-03-2004, 07:58 PM
I say jump in and see if you can swim. You never know how adept you are until you try it. Some people have a natural talent for creating motion with no formal training. It simply makes sense to them. You'll never know if you're one of these people until you try. If you find that you can't do it, then I'd got to the aforementioned methods.

Pilchard
08-04-2004, 09:51 AM
I say jump in and see if you can swim. You never know how adept you are until you try it. Some people have a natural talent for creating motion with no formal training. It simply makes sense to them. You'll never know if you're one of these people until you try. If you find that you can't do it, then I'd got to the aforementioned methods.
Good point there! No harm in trying! You may be a natural!

Ablefish
08-04-2004, 06:01 PM
Y'know, if it was a matter of learning Character Animation OR 3D Animating, I might agree. But both? I think that's a recipe for frustration. We did two months of traditional animation at VFS and I consider it invaluable... Timing timing timing...

GavinG
08-04-2004, 06:13 PM
Exactly, even though I didn't really enjoy my time doing 2d...whenever i animate in 3d, the knowledge that I gained is a huge benefit. Thats the same situation for everything though..if you want to model, take some life drawing and/or sculpting classes etc. Most situations in 3D have a traditional art foundation. Once you build that solid foundation the 3D will make much more sense.

You still can just dive into it, but i think you'll find most excellent 3d animators are also very strong 2d animators (or at least i'd assume...i'm not really an animator)

Hey, Ablefish: any idea when the next Vancouver XSI user group is? :D

-Gav

Ablefish
08-04-2004, 07:00 PM
Hey, Ablefish: any idea when the next Vancouver XSI user group is? :D

-GavBrief step to the side in this thread- Only Adam knows. :D

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