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Jim
06-06-2004, 05:30 PM
Here's a horse I'm working on. I think I've got all the basic shapes blocked but I'm not sure how to continue. Any advice or crits are welcome. I also posted this in the 3d wip forum.

http://www.geocities.com/jbach10/horseTest_02.txt

http://www.geocities.com/jbach10/horseSimpleWire.txt

Sciatica
06-06-2004, 11:21 PM
Hmm... my wife would be better at this than me since she's the horse fan, but since she's currently not around, your stuck with me..

Its looking pretty horsey right now.. Muscles and proportion all seem pretty fair.. Its hard to tell from here, but you may need more detail on his sides (above the front legs).. As I remember, lots of horses seem to have muscle bludges/indents in this area.. I may be wrong on this though, so check some source material.. same with the rump.. the rump of a horse contains a serious amount of muscles.. I would suggest bulking up this area abit..

One thing I am sure about though, is that the legs look awkward.. Right now it looks like its walking on its feet, and it has 2 kneecaps. I may be telling you something you already know here, but you asked for the critique, so deal with it ;) Horses, overtime evolved from walking on their feet and toes to actually walking on their middle toe! What we initially perceive as being a second kneecap below the first, is actualy the joint of their heel.. This is why, around this area and the hoof, you can notice tiny little vestigial toes.. check some source material on this to confirm my critique, just to make sure, and find out where to go from here. The horse evolved like this so that it can outrun its predators.. but unfortunatly this also means that a horse is not standing on the strongest of supports.. Its really bizzare cause, a horse is a really big and heavy animal, yet, it evolved to the point of standing on its toes.. this means that horses are in a constaint danger of breaking these bones. That being said.. now that I look at it, you horse could probably use more weight in its middle section in general.. it seems pretty thin, but this all depends on the past history of your horse plus its breed and genetics.. but even Fresians (one of the leaner horses I have seen) still have a bit of tubbyness around the midsection..

The reason Im telling you all this is just so you can have a better idea on how the legs of this horse should look/operate.. as I said before.. if you already knew all this.. sorry :)

Im 99% sure my information is accurate. I dont have the best memory, but my information comes straight from the primary equine teacher at Olds College (pretty well recognized as being one of the best farming and agriculture schools you can go to.). so if my facts are false.. dont blame the source, blame me.. I probably got confused :) (this is why I usually suggest double checking critique instead of just having faith in the "intelligence" of others.. you never know.. :) )

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