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pmiles
08-23-2005, 01:46 AM
I thought you said you were going to go to sleep Mike... LOL. Glad to hear you finally got your packet... now let the nail bitting begin as we wait to find out if our checks bounced... LOL.

splintah
08-23-2005, 10:01 AM
i just keep wondering about how they are gonna keep a tab on quality check on such a number.....500+....?
and this number is only set to grow every semester....

i'm sure there must have been some serious thoughts put into this situation already....

mmmfff......feeling better already after typing this out......;)

that's my main concern aswell

pmiles
08-23-2005, 04:28 PM
I believe the original max student load was quoted at 300. I'm assuming that is the maximum number of students that they could enroll in the first class. Technically if no one falters, one could conceiveably have 1800 students enrolled when all 6 classes are finally in session.

Natural attrition will likely prevent those numbers from ever happening. I do see the first class hitting maximum capacity, but I don't see the subsequent sessions following suit. Students take a session off, can't afford to continue, get a job, whatever. It's the same system that all schools use... they always set the initial enrollment high because not everyone will make it through to the end, for whatever reason. When I studied architecture, they let 150 students into the program, but only 50 were allowed access into the second year of study. By the time graduation rolled around, there were maybe 25 students left total in our class.

If the mentors are being honest with their students, they will not allow a student to progress to the next level without demonstrating an adequate competancy for that level. The minimum level is a "C" to progress... but from what I have heard so far, "A"s are hard to come by in this school, so most students should be hovering around the "B" level. As they progress in the program, that elusive "A" will become even harder to attain, so instead of moving up the grade scale, they should find themselves fighting to maintain their current level... the ante goes up with each class. But this is just my conjecture as I am not actually in any of the classes now, I will start in the Fall.

So 500 students total in the school is likely closer to 300 in the first class, and 150 in the second class, and 50 in the third class come this Fall. This is just a wild guess, but I'd say the breakdown is heavier towards the first class and lessor as you get to the higher classes. That would be how attrition would affect the class makeup over the course of the program.

Sean MacNeil
08-23-2005, 11:20 PM
[QUOTE=pmiles]but from what I have heard so far, "A"s are hard to come by in this school, QUOTE]

Darn tootin'. You have to earn your marks at AM which I like. If you happen to slack off a bit one week on your assignment, it really shows. And my mentor seems to be able to spot when I do halfass work from a mile away.

Kimotion
08-24-2005, 07:11 AM
If the mentors are being honest with their students, they will not allow a student to progress to the next level without demonstrating an adequate competancy for that level. The minimum level is a "C" to progress... but from what I have heard so far, "A"s are hard to come by in this school, so most students should be hovering around the "B" level. As they progress in the program, that elusive "A" will become even harder to attain, so instead of moving up the grade scale, they should find themselves fighting to maintain their current level... the ante goes up with each class. But this is just my conjecture as I am not actually in any of the classes now, I will start in the Fall.



This is EXACTLY one of the main reason why I am so glad I'm in this school.

Kid-Mesh
08-24-2005, 12:21 PM
Just got accepted into the Winter 06 term.

Looking forward to meeting and animating with everyone involved. :thumbsup:

anthea
08-24-2005, 10:32 PM
So 500 students total in the school is likely closer to 300 in the first class, and 150 in the second class, and 50 in the third class come this Fall. This is just a wild guess, but I'd say the breakdown is heavier towards the first class and lessor as you get to the higher classes. That would be how attrition would affect the class makeup over the course of the program.

I'm not sure where you got these numbers from... Right now we have 80 students in Level A and about 200 in Level B (Brian is that about right?) So your numbers are not possible only 80 will be elligible to progress to Level B (not including students who do not pass level B and want to take it over)

Probably more like : (total 500)
250 (new students) in Level A
80 in Level B
170 in Level C

When AM first started i think there were originally 250 students in our Level A class.

I think it is a great thing for all you new students to have another large class. There are so many animations to see and crit, so many new friends to make and there will always be someone there on the forums at the exact time you need an emergency crit. The size of the new class is a plus. And I am pretty sure they will keep the mentor class sizes down to the same size of 10-15 students per mentor.

My Fault
08-24-2005, 11:21 PM
Yeah Anty (nyah, nyah ROTFL) you are pretty close there. It was like 243 for first class (yeah us! LOL) 87 for second and 200 for the new crew coming in in a few weeks. I believe, from something Bobby mentioned, that our mentors will be giving us (those going from 2nd to 3rd semester) an appraisal of our skills before we move on. Wether that means they will hold someone back I am not sure.

One thing I will say is the skill level has risen quite impressively and I can't think of anyone offhand who would not move on. There was a much larger gap in skill levels in the first semester. Some folks who had never really animated before (I'm looking at you, oh pink jumpsuited shaved cat owning one) have improved at a level that is completely staggering to me. Really shows how well this crazy school does work. Kudos to the 3 ninjas and their mad, mad crew for doing such a terrific job. And kudos to the students for putting in so much hard work...... awesome!

pmiles
08-24-2005, 11:31 PM
Perhaps someone could keep some stats on this? I mean on day one there is x number of students... by the time you get to the last session of the class, how many are still with that group. One can't really project who will leave for whatever reason, so the numbers will fluctuate up and down from class to class as people take some time off.

The 500 people came from an earlier post. I didn't come up with that number. The 300 people per class comes from the downloaded PDF.

And if there were'nt 300 in the first class, what kept them from getting in... other than a poorly worded essay??? LOL... I just had to get that in...

My Fault
08-24-2005, 11:40 PM
And if there were'nt 300 in the first class, what kept them from getting in... other than a poorly worded essay??? LOL... I just had to get that in...

Ouch, I think I was just Pmiles'd! :applause:

It will be interesting to see who is still here at the end. I think the number will surprise many people. Will also be interested to see how many get hired. Once again, I think the number will be high. Will it be at Pixar, probably not, but I know most people see this as a stepping stone and not the golden ticket some folks who aren't in AM think it is.

Plus I hear that Carlos wants the final semester to be like the Beyond Thunderdome, two animators enter, one animator leaves..... but don't quote me on that!

Kimotion
08-24-2005, 11:40 PM
Perhaps someone could keep some stats on this? I mean on day one there is x number of students... by the time you get to the last session of the class, how many are still with that group. One can't really project who will leave for whatever reason, so the numbers will fluctuate up and down from class to class as people take some time off.


I think this is the job for the Hall Monitors...oops...I mean AM Moderators: Aja and Brian!

Nuff said.

My Fault
08-24-2005, 11:49 PM
I think this is the job for the Hall Monitors...oops...I mean AM Moderators: Aja and Brian!

Crackin skulls baby, one of the perks of the job! You don't even want to know what Thug A does. That gal is brutal! :)

Thug B

coop
08-24-2005, 11:57 PM
bring it on, sucka!

My Fault
08-25-2005, 12:16 AM
bring it on, sucka!

Haha, you do not want me to sick Aja on you Coop. She has a left hook that even the Guv'nor would've feared!

coop
08-25-2005, 12:46 AM
I hear she's got a glass jaw. And my wife tells me i've got a tremendously thick skull, so I'm not worried.

anthea
08-25-2005, 12:54 AM
lol, brian you are the best hall monitor ever!! what a cool job you superstar featured student!!

abt the 300 per semester, I think that is their projected goal or perhaps limit. I am not sure why there were only 87 students accepted last semester, I don't think it was due to poor essays lol. It is a new program and perhaps they weren't prepared this time for another 250 new heads bobbing around in there. But next semester it's on!

No one knows for sure as Brian was saying, how many students will finish. As of yet all is up inthe air. I plan on finishing AM, I just can't stop cause it's so much fun! But other students may not be able to go all the way through without taking breaks. SOme are enrolled in other programs like Ali, and many more have full time jobs and families that take precedent.

But I think so far the stats on returning students has been high and the improvement is animation skills surely improved from semester to semester for each individual student. My bouncing balls from last semester were horrific, says the pink jumpsuit wearing girl with the shaved squishy cat.

StapleGun
08-25-2005, 07:30 AM
I noticed that those who post a lot here are also featured students. How does this work? Are Brian and Asia the best animators in the class? Is there a way to see their work? I would love to see what is considered the best work on animationmentor, just to see how they stack up with other schools like academy of art or Ringling.

splintah
08-25-2005, 09:50 AM
Just got accepted into the Winter 06 term.

Looking forward to meeting and animating with everyone involved. :thumbsup:

can i already apply for winter 06 ?

i would like to start mid march
since i do my last uni semester

Maciek Gliwa
08-25-2005, 10:17 AM
Hi guys,
do you know if it is possible to simply transfer money from my account directly to AM account instead of paying using credit card or check? I wrote e-mail to AM with this question but have no reply yet.

Kid-Mesh
08-25-2005, 01:09 PM
can i already apply for winter 06 ?

i would like to start mid march
since i do my last uni semester

When applied I choose the winter program as my first choice and it was given :twisted:

I still have some loose ends that need to be tidy so the fall class was too soon for me. Other wise I would have jumped at the opportunity for the fall class because Im ready to go right now..

On the other hand I enjoy reading through this thread as the energy in here is electric...I think by the time the winter class starts I will have lost my mind due to high anticipation :D

My Fault
08-25-2005, 03:02 PM
I noticed that those who post a lot here are also featured students. How does this work? Are Brian and Asia the best animators in the class? Is there a way to see their work? I would love to see what is considered the best work on animationmentor, just to see how they stack up with other schools like academy of art or Ringling.

Honestly Staple Gun I certainly don't consider myself the best animator here at good ol AM. I believe (and this is just my opinion) that they pick the featured student on a combination of things. I think it is part animation skills, imagination, attitude and general helpfulness around AM and many other things. Personally for me the biggest badass animator at AM right now is Bill O'Brien (following hot on his heels is Reb!). His stuff blows me away. He currently works at Bungie and not only does his animation kick booty but he is a super nice guy and tries to help everybody out. Well, except for Nathan (go Bentllama!) who he throws things at!

I have all my assignments from the first quarter up here, I will post this quarters up in a couple of weeks.
http://briannicolucci.com/AM-Session1.html
As you can see, they still need a lot of work. That is what is so nice about AM, we are constantly improving. I believe Aja has posted hers up on her blog. If you want to see more of what is going on at the school I would highly recommend reading some of our blogs. It is a good insight in to the goings on there.

Check how we compare to the other schools in a few months when we are doing more acting assignments. Hopefully we exceed expectations.

fluffybunny
08-25-2005, 03:49 PM
I believe (and this is just my opinion) that they pick the featured student on a combination of things. I think it is part animation skills, imagination, attitude and general helpfulness around AM and many other things.


Don't you also make a weekly in person visit to AM with a Wagon full 'o KitKat's ?
(similar to a wagon full 'o pancakes...but less messy unless left in the sun too long and the KitKat's aren't interested in the Champeenship)

That has to get you lots 'o points too :D

eric

pmiles
08-25-2005, 04:11 PM
LOL... give it up Brian... they thought you had an awesome essay! :D

My Fault
08-25-2005, 04:24 PM
Actually you are both right, I wrapped my essay around a year supply of KitKats! :scream:

anthea
08-25-2005, 05:07 PM
there have been 2 featured student and featured mentors so far. i wouldn't say that the featured student is better or the best, just as the featured mentor isn't better than other mentors (although derek and jason r do kick some mighty booty, as do brian and aja on the students side). think of featured student as a spotlight on a current student and an interview to look into their thoughts and lives. of course AM isn't going to pick a student for featured student who is slacking off and not doing well, brian and aja have both been amazing! as for "the best" assignments so far, a lot of the students, like myself haven't finalized anything yet and are all works in progress. some of the more amazing work, and my favorites too, comes out of the students (like billo and rebecca) who have professional animation experience, but we newbies are biting at their heels, and seeing all their amazing work only pushes us farther. a good way to compare work to other schools would be to look at 2 students who never had animation experience before starting, you could compare my stuff (http://antheakerou.blogspot.com/) to a student at another school who has also only been animating for 5 months into that program, that would be fair. since we have another year to go it would not be fair to compare against final projects after 4 years of instruction, since we are only in our 5th month with 1 year to go.

Kimotion
08-25-2005, 05:24 PM
I noticed that those who post a lot here are also featured students. How does this work? Are Brian and Asia the best animators in the class? Is there a way to see their work? I would love to see what is considered the best work on animationmentor, just to see how they stack up with other schools like academy of art or Ringling.

StapleGun, I know you despise the Academy as much as I do, but don't dare put AAU and Ringling in the same sentence! It's not fair because Ringling is an actual school.

mikefeil
08-25-2005, 05:38 PM
oh man oh man am I excited...posted my rego today...my hard earned dollars of packing shelves has finally payed off....I am just so excited, and reading all you guys posts have just like, aw god.


so soon but yet so far.

My Fault
08-25-2005, 05:46 PM
oh man oh man am I excited...posted my rego today...my hard earned dollars of packing shelves has finally payed off....I am just so excited, and reading all you guys posts have just like, aw god.


so soon but yet so far.

Awesome Mike, look forward to seeing you around the AM (virtual) campus!

Look forward to seeing pmiles as well, though I hear her first few weeks she will be stuck in the "How to write an essay" class. :D

pmiles
08-25-2005, 07:43 PM
Look forward to seeing pmiles as well, though I hear her first few weeks she will be stuck in the "How to write an essay" class. :D

Touche
:applause:

Sean MacNeil
08-25-2005, 11:54 PM
Look forward to seeing pmiles as well, though I hear her first few weeks she will be stuck in the "How to write an essay" class. :D

Touche:applause:

I'm getting the feeling that this could be goin' on for awhile...I'm just going to sit back and enjoy. http://forums.cgsociety.org/images/icons/icon10.gif



oh man oh man am I excited...posted my rego today...my hard earned dollars of packing shelves has finally payed off....I am just so excited, and reading all you guys posts have just like, aw god.


so soon but yet so far.

Hey Mike, your entusiasm is great! Honestly, in my opinion, it's this kind of enthusiasm that makes AM such an awesome community! Also, this energy will naturally transfer into your assignments and give your work that little edge, believe me. Alot of the students who are passionate and enthusiastic like you, produce the better looking work. Keep the energy levels up, if for no other reason, so that guys like me can tap into it on occasion for inspiration...hehehe http://forums.cgsociety.org/images/icons/icon10.gif



Later,
Sean.

andy_maxman
08-26-2005, 04:55 AM
this has got to be so supercool news for animators digging for live-motion reference.....if anything of what they show in these samples (http://www.pom.tv/motiondvds.html#) is to be believed that is........

aaahh! trackers....showing ease ins and fast outs.....(chk out Fighting Volume 2 - sample no.2)
and the camera work is just about right for study material......
i got the link from cgt home page ad......

.......and forgive me master if its old news.....:)

ttesla
08-26-2005, 05:31 AM
I am not sure why there were only 87 students accepted last semester, I don't think it was due to poor essays lol. It is a new program and perhaps they weren't prepared this time for another 250 new heads bobbing around in there. But next semester it's on!because many people didn't wanted to have two busy summers in a row...as we do. :)

My Fault
08-26-2005, 06:14 AM
Yeah, I'm honestly not surprised at the low turnout for summer. I debated briefly taking the summer off because like most people with kids, summer is vacation time which really eats in to school time. I'm glad I didn't of course but I would guess a lot of folk took some quality time to chill before diving in whole hog in the fall.

d_jnaneswar
08-26-2005, 10:12 AM
Free samples are always good ;). thanks for the link andy..

by the way... Read a couple of pages earlier that bill o'brian's work kicks ass... any one got a link to his blog?

My Fault
08-26-2005, 10:27 AM
Bill works at Bungie and does AM.... I don't think he has any time for a blog. Heck, I'm not even sure if he eats! :)

mikefeil
08-26-2005, 10:43 AM
If you don't mind me asking how do all you current mentees study with AM. I mean do u like take endless notes on the videos and crits etc. What I'm trying to ask I guess is how do you guys approach this course, and how do you go about learning the most you can.

Mojo Rizen
08-26-2005, 01:34 PM
Hey My Fault,

It looks like we are similar in having a full time job and kids. How much time are you putting in on AM a week. Iíve been watching my time, trying to figure out if I in fact have the time between working in the graphics industry and raising a family with out neglecting either to do AM.

I know the whole story if you want it bad enough, I have a wife who understands it is a big commitment, but I also donít want my kids to be to the point of, ďis Dad in the studio againĒ

I can chunk off time after they go to bed, but itís the burn out potential Iím trying to avoid if I do AM.

nimajneb
08-26-2005, 01:56 PM
If you don't mind me asking how do all you current mentees study with AM. I mean do u like take endless notes on the videos and crits etc. What I'm trying to ask I guess is how do you guys approach this course, and how do you go about learning the most you can.

Approach it like you would any other college course. Take notes? It's always been my experience that this is of limited value. Notes are a best pointers to call something up in your memory that you already know. AM graciously supplies Key Points PDF's for each session that hits to salient points of the lecture. The most useful experience is critique. It
s very nice to have a large group of folks all working on the same page, looking over each other's shoulders. That coupled with the professional mentors crit's are really what makes AM worth the money and time. You really only learn animation by doing. All the study in the world isn't worth anything without application, and making some mistakes. That's what crit is all about, and it's really why I love AM so far.

Kid-Mesh
08-26-2005, 05:54 PM
I was wondering about the supplied character rigs from AM. Are they simple and easy to use rigs? Do the rigs become more complex based on the models provided as the course progresses?

Lastly, is it a resuable rig that you can use with your own characters and/or recreate with minimal effort?

Thanks..

stewartjones
08-26-2005, 05:56 PM
I was wondering about the supplied character rigs from AM. Are they simple and easy to use rigs? Do the rigs become more complex based on the models provided as the course progresses?

Lastly, is it a resuable rig that you can use with your own characters and/or recreate with minimal effort?

Thanks..

Yes to all the above! :thumbsup:

Kid-Mesh
08-26-2005, 06:08 PM
That's good news :thumbsup:

I have a while until the winter class starts so I want to create some cool characters to use on my reel later as I develop my skills through this program. So if I can resuse the supplied rigs then that is just awesome.

Thanks

My Fault
08-26-2005, 06:18 PM
If you don't mind me asking how do all you current mentees study with AM. I mean do u like take endless notes on the videos and crits etc. What I'm trying to ask I guess is how do you guys approach this course, and how do you go about learning the most you can.

Can't speak for everyone but my week generally goes something like this.

Sunday at noon after turning my assignment in at 11:59 and 59 seconds (gotta get as much time as possible!!) I wander around the workspaces a bit and crit and comment on other animations that have been submitted. 9 times out of 10 I find that Samy has already commented. Damn you Samy! (LOL)

After those crits I head on over to the vid page and check out the lecture. I usually watch it through once and then take notes the next time. I will also check out the assignment video which better describes the goals of this weeks assignment and also gives BOOM a nice chance to leap around for a few minutes thereby burning calories and keeping in svelte, ninja animator shape.

Will also IM back and forth and hit the forums over the next day or so to discuss with fellow students. See if what we are all thinking is sanity or madness. Once that is decided we go full on with madness!

Then I usually hide under my desk for a few days, lamenting that I have no idea what in the hell I am doing and at some point Bobby will realize this and kick me out of the school. So far the hiding has worked as I am still here. :)

Once my crisis of faith is averted I drink a few mudslides and tear in to my assignment. I personally do a bunch of small tests of bits of the assignment. Very rarely do I ever get a chance to work on my assignment until Saturday. For the last few weeks I don't even sleep on Saturday nights so Sat and Sun are now one big day which I like to call "Stay the hell outta my way and let me animate" day. My wife occasionally calls it, "If you don't stop animating and take me to dinner every once in awhile you will be sleeping on the couch" day. The wife 1 me 0. :scream:

So that is what my week looks like. I hear Anthea makes Squishy shoot reference footage for a week to help out. If only I could get my rats to do that too.

My Fault
08-26-2005, 06:28 PM
Hey My Fault,

It looks like we are similar in having a full time job and kids. How much time are you putting in on AM a week. Iíve been watching my time, trying to figure out if I in fact have the time between working in the graphics industry and raising a family with out neglecting either to do AM.

I know the whole story if you want it bad enough, I have a wife who understands it is a big commitment, but I also donít want my kids to be to the point of, ďis Dad in the studio againĒ

I can chunk off time after they go to bed, but itís the burn out potential Iím trying to avoid if I do AM.

Hey John!

I probably put in between 40-50 hrs. a thirrd to half that lately has been lectures, critqiuing, the forums etc with the rest being animation. The bulk of thatanimation is late at night and on SaturSunday. You can put more or less it depends on how you like to work. Luckily the first semester should be less as the assignments are less complex.

Work and home life (my son is homeschooled but thankfully fairls self sufficient now) take up a good chunk of time but that is good. If you spend every waking minute doing this you tend to lose touch with the real world and in the end your animation and observation skills will suffer. Never forget that the more you experience in life the better you can convey this in animation or the stories you want to tell. It is a balance that we all wrestle with. IMHO burnout will happen, it is inevitable and is a part of finding that balance. So don't fight it too hard but try to keep an eye out for it.

I am lucky in that my wife and son are very supportive and understanding. I joke that my wife gives me a hard time but really she does tons of stuff so I have time to better focus. I would not be able to do half as much as I do without her. So a supportive family is very, very important. Supportive friends (you will make a crapload around the school, great, great folk) helps as well.

Well back to animating. I have 80 frames drawn, only another 160 to go. Oh, as much as I love 2d sometimes it is a killer!

kenshi
08-26-2005, 06:39 PM
personally, i take lots of notes. i find that if i actually write it down, it becomes more a part of me. i process the information differently than just passively sitting there nodding my head, saying, "uh-huh, uh-huh, i know that, sure, i can see that's important..." i also make quick sketches of things they show in the lecture to illustrate points. this also sharpens my drawing skills, which helps with animation planning, etc. - you get the picture. i keep all my notes in an artist's sketchbook, which also has all my planning thumbnails, and observational sketches (i carry it around with me everywhere i go). it's also nice to go back through the notes and see things i wrote really big that mean, "Remember this!", etc.

i don't know about you, but even if you have a photographic memory, you can't possibly recall all the important concepts all the time. notes serve as a second memory! the stuff we are learning is gold, so making a personal record of it is invaluable, as far as i am concerned.

having animation, movement and gesture observation on the brain at all times is super key! pay attention! i usually watch the class one time through, taking no notes, and then go through my week, looking for examples of what i've learned either from life or in movies. then i'll go back and re-watch the class, pausing to take notes i want to store away.

find out what your assignment is that week, and think a lot about it. write down or sketch out the ideas you get when you're taking a shower, or driving around, or taking a walk...(those tend to be times when i get a lot of ideas).

your approach will change to suit your needs as you try to balance everything, but keep in mind that you will only be able to have this time of super concentrated learning for 18 months and what you take note of now will be available for you to go back and reference down the road when you're working on a shot and saying, "i wish i had taken notes on that class on arcs cause there was something Shawn said that would really help out right now, or was it Carlos?..."

agreenster
08-26-2005, 06:45 PM
Bill works at Bungie and does AM.... I don't think he has any time for a blog. Heck, I'm not even sure if he eats! :)

Meh, the guys at Bungie are slackers. ;) Shaba's where its AT! :buttrock:Ha ha, j/k

However, we've been pullin 12-18 hour days for months......UGH

So to all you animation students out there, dont think it gets easier once you're out of school! ;) But it's fun at least

BTW: Brian, I didnt know you had a full-time job too! What do you do?

agreenster
08-26-2005, 06:54 PM
i don't know about you, but even if you have a photographic memory, you can't possibly recall all the important concepts all the time. notes serve as a second memory! the stuff we are learning is gold, so making a personal record of it is invaluable, as far as i am concerned.

"i wish i had taken notes on that class on arcs cause there was something Shawn said that would really help out right now, or was it Carlos?..."

Actually, what's valuable about AM (from what I can tell) is that it's less of a "trick of the trade" they teach, and more of techniques to work by, so that you wont really want to do it any other way. It will become second nature.

You'll find that when you do animation as a full time job, these techniques arent really things you need to "go back and look at" anymore because you use them every second of every day. Ultimately practice makes perfect. AM seems like a fantastic foundation because they teach you these techniques straight out of the gate and focus on building the animation from the inside out. Dont stress too much or overwork it. Animation is also an art form that develops, complete with different tastes and influences and techniques, so dont be afraid to experiment too. Use the tools to make the art, dont focus so much on the tools and techniques that you lose sight of that, you know what I mean? Afterall, animation is still relatively young and we are ALL beginners.

My Fault
08-26-2005, 06:55 PM
i keep all my notes in an artist's sketchbook, which also has all my planning thumbnails, and observational sketches

I briefly saw Kenshi's sketchbook at siggraph... lordy, lordy I want me a copy when this class is done. Awesome sketches and chock full of great info. I tried to steal it but he put me in the dreaded reverse malaysian back pinch and I gave it back. :D

My Fault
08-26-2005, 06:59 PM
Meh, the guys at Bungie are slackers. ;) Shaba's where its AT! :buttrock:Ha ha, j/k

However, we've been pullin 12-18 hour days for months......UGH

So to all you animation students out there, dont think it gets easier once you're out of school! ;) But it's fun at least

BTW: Brian, I didnt know you had a full-time job too! What do you do?

Yeah man, I know as busy as I might be at least I get to go home at night. Most of the games folk I know work crazy, crazy hours. Some of the guys in my group were doing their weekly Q&A's at work and my buddy that works at Planet Moon is pretty much always there. I don't know how you guys do it. I'm guessing it is the free beer, but I could be wrong!

Alas my day job is boring (work with awesome people though) and while I do occasionally get to draw and animate it is mostly database web stuff. Ugh, I so need to get out before I am too old and require a walker and a nurse to get around.

agreenster
08-26-2005, 07:04 PM
...and a nurse to get around.

Hmmm.....could be a good thing.

And yeah, its ALL about the free beer, no question.

Actually, Im totally spoiled now. I havent had to worry about feeding myself in what, 3 months now? On the weekends my wife asks me "So what do you want to do for supper?" and my knee-jerk response is always "Oh they'll just order something in....er.....wait. Ill fire up the grill. Damnit."

Kid-Mesh
08-26-2005, 07:20 PM
I read some where that it is encouraged to do other animations along with your current assignments or extend off them so you can benefit from the Mentor's / students C&C.

Do some of you do that? Do some of you feel like the time is there to experiement further while keeping up with the current lesson for the week?

anthea
08-26-2005, 07:36 PM
I read some where that it is encouraged to do other animations along with your current assignments or extend off them so you can benefit from the Mentor's / students C&C.

Do some of you do that? Do some of you feel like the time is there to experiement further while keeping up with the current lesson for the week?

Well, the mentors are not going to critique work that is not AM work. Unless you get special permission for a reel critique or something. The work we are doing takes up most of our time, I don't see others doing side projects and getting their AM projects in on time. AM is enough to take up a full time schedule for sure! I am in class 2 and we just started on our 4th project for the semester. There hasn't been room for side projects, I am just trying to learn the current lessons and pracicing on what AM assigns. I would suggest putting your ALL into your current lessons at hand.

Kimotion
08-26-2005, 08:08 PM
And yeah, its ALL about the free beer, no question.


Yes.


On the weekends my wife asks me "So what do you want to do for supper?" and my knee-jerk response is always "Oh they'll just order something in....er.....wait. Ill fire up the grill. Damnit."

Supper? Is that a term they use in Indiana?

Kimotion
08-26-2005, 08:10 PM
Hey John!

The bulk of thatanimation is late at night and on SaturSunday.

Hahaha....SaturSunday. I like that word.

agreenster
08-26-2005, 08:36 PM
Yes.



Supper? Is that a term they use in Indiana?

Listen here, S.H.--

Kimotion
08-26-2005, 08:39 PM
I've been getting about 3 e-mails a week asking me question about AM and how it "really" is. Although I love getting e-mails and am flattered that people actually read my blog, I want to address a question that I've kept getting. And I know the future people who will write me will find me via this thread:

Often asked Q: Are the blogs paid for by AM? Are you part of the PR department?

Answer: NO NO NO NO! People have different reasons for blogging, and once AM started up, it became something of a trend. It's a way to communicate to other students, because most do not see each other in person. Blogging in one of many ways to show our stuff, express our feelings, and sometimes get something off our chest.

But you know what? I can understand the suspicion. It's not often you encounter a school where there are students who actually like it.

Kimotion
08-26-2005, 08:40 PM
Listen here, S.H.--

Say it......SAY IT! I am proud of my birth/middle name. But the question is: can you spell it?

agreenster
08-26-2005, 08:46 PM
Um, YEAH, I can spell it

SANG HOON!

Kimotion
08-26-2005, 08:50 PM
Um, YEAH, I can spell it

SANG HOON!

Please note that the "A" in Sang is long vowel sound. Like in "cAr." Or "cigAr."

Kid-Mesh
08-26-2005, 10:07 PM
Well, the mentors are not going to critique work that is not AM work. Unless you get special permission for a reel critique or something. The work we are doing takes up most of our time, I don't see others doing side projects and getting their AM projects in on time. AM is enough to take up a full time schedule for sure! I am in class 2 and we just started on our 4th project for the semester. There hasn't been room for side projects, I am just trying to learn the current lessons and pracicing on what AM assigns. I would suggest putting your ALL into your current lessons at hand.


Thanks...I figured as much :)

SlipGun
08-27-2005, 01:08 AM
Ahhh, so I was up till 6 this morning doodling and videotaping reference for heavy pushes ... I do believe I could burn out before even starting my first day at AM. :D

Anyway, I see they've updated the website to display "$14,275 introductory pricing." Do they get to use the "introductory" tag until the first class graduates? How much more expensive could it get?

pmiles
08-27-2005, 03:27 PM
Fall 2005-Winter 2006 students are paying $200 more per class than students who enrolled in the Spring-Summer 2005 session. Once you are enrolled, your tuition is mapped out for your entire time. You are signing a contract to pay only x amount for the full 6 classes. Note that unless you are able to pony up the entire tuition upfront (i.e. $14,275), you will be charged a payment processing fee in addition to that $14,275 (an additional $250). I Don't know if the tuition hikes will be on a yearly basis or on a semester basis. Their catalog only covers two enrollment periods at a time. There is nothing in the catalog or in the enrollment agreement that talks about tuition adjustments for students who take time off and return. Some schools don't allow students to take a session off without a tuition hike penalty. Since there is no mention of such a hike (now), I'd say that the amount you enrolled at will remain constant for the entire duration of your stay. This could change for new enrollees but for those of us who have already signed a contract, we are probably locked in to the tuition we agreed to on our enrollment contracts.

StapleGun
08-27-2005, 06:18 PM
StapleGun, I know you despise the Academy as much as I do, but don't dare put AAU and Ringling in the same sentence! It's not fair because Ringling is an actual school.

LOL! I mentioned the two schools to show an extreme comparison!

StapleGun
08-27-2005, 06:29 PM
Honestly Staple Gun I certainly don't consider myself the best animator here at good ol AM. I believe (and this is just my opinion) that they pick the featured student on a combination of things. I think it is part animation skills, imagination, attitude and general helpfulness around AM and many other things. Personally for me the biggest badass animator at AM right now is Bill O'Brien (following hot on his heels is Reb!). His stuff blows me away. He currently works at Bungie and not only does his animation kick booty but he is a super nice guy and tries to help everybody out. Well, except for Nathan (go Bentllama!) who he throws things at!

I have all my assignments from the first quarter up here, I will post this quarters up in a couple of weeks.
http://briannicolucci.com/AM-Session1.html
As you can see, they still need a lot of work. That is what is so nice about AM, we are constantly improving. I believe Aja has posted hers up on her blog. If you want to see more of what is going on at the school I would highly recommend reading some of our blogs. It is a good insight in to the goings on there.

Check how we compare to the other schools in a few months when we are doing more acting assignments. Hopefully we exceed expectations.


Cool. I see that there is a huge difference in skill level. And I heard their grading is system is more critical than others. Does this mean that a lot drop out? I am actually hoping for more critical standards because at my school they automatically pass anyone that has a credit card.

Before I sign on with AM, I want to be absolutely sure that time for serious students is not sucked away because of slackers. I know that everyone gets personalized critiques, but im thinking if the mentor will be so tired from having to critique one incompentant student, he wont have time or energy for an actually good serious student. the first 2 levels will all be a free for all, but as the program progresses, if the bad student is still in the program, this will make AM no different from the Academy of Art.

mmkelly011881
08-27-2005, 06:47 PM
hey staplestan,

a few people didnt pass on to the second semester and a few people have dropped due to the workload (more dropped out due to issues outside AM but will be returning at a later date)

id say.. the way that they teach it.. it's hard not to learn and progress... i dont think anyone who went on to the second quarter shouldnt have

-Matt

pmiles
08-27-2005, 07:03 PM
I hear what you are saying... I've always valued a critical critque over that of fluff. I remember when I was in college studying architecture. Me and my friend would always critque each others work. My friend would always say how wonderful everything was, never actually pointing out anything that may need to be fixed. I on the other hand, always pointed out what needed to be fixed. This annoyed her to no end because she wasn't looking for an honest critique, she just wanted some reassurance. Well she would end up going through the critique with the professor and he would point out the very same things that I pointed out to her... things that she could have corrected beforehand. Eventually I just never said anything about her work, so she just waited until the professor pointed it out to her. Some people just operate that way. I'd like to know what needs to be fixed or what could be done better, that's the whole point of having an extra pair of eyes look at it. If all we wanted was a pat on the shoulder, our parents are just a phone call away. Not to say that good comments are bad... just that a heavy dose of reality is usually a better friend in the long run.

Okay... flame away... :thumbsup:

Nitefyre
08-27-2005, 07:15 PM
Okay... flame away... :thumbsup:

I got your back on this one pmiles! :D

I completely agree with you. You should be accepting crit's from everyone! Everyone has something to offer and is knowledgeable in a certain field.

AM has been mentioning that if one person points something out then you should look at it. If two people point out the same thing you should take a serious look at it and if three people point it out you have a problem that needs to be fixed.

anthea
08-27-2005, 08:09 PM
Ahhh, so I was up till 6 this morning doodling and videotaping reference for heavy pushes ... I do believe I could burn out before even starting my first day at AM. :D

Anyway, I see they've updated the website to display "$14,275 introductory pricing." Do they get to use the "introductory" tag until the first class graduates? How much more expensive could it get?

Well we didn't get to heavy pushes untill 4 months into the program, so if you want to sketch just observe and sketch life around you and try taking a mental inventory of reference of your daily surroundings. You should just take each lesson as it comes and not worry so far into the future, if you don't focus on the current lessons then you run the risk of missing what they are trying to teach you. For the first class we mainly animated bouncing balls, there were no full body animations, only single poses using the full body character, so you don't have to worry about the push assignment for many months to come and by that time you will be ready.

I still think the price AM is offering way outbeats the other competition schools who offer "animation training". And believe me you get a way better value at AM if you want to learn character animation. I learnt more in the first month at AM than I did at my Masters Program in 3d ant NYU which I paid $60,000 for, so I think AM is giving us a bargain! When you become a student you will see just how comprehensive the learning is and how intricite the site and all the features are. It's truly an amazing community.

So chin up! You're in AM now!

anthea
08-27-2005, 08:15 PM
Cool. I see that there is a huge difference in skill level. And I heard their grading is system is more critical than others. Does this mean that a lot drop out? I am actually hoping for more critical standards because at my school they automatically pass anyone that has a credit card.

Before I sign on with AM, I want to be absolutely sure that time for serious students is not sucked away because of slackers. I know that everyone gets personalized critiques, but im thinking if the mentor will be so tired from having to critique one incompentant student, he wont have time or energy for an actually good serious student. the first 2 levels will all be a free for all, but as the program progresses, if the bad student is still in the program, this will make AM no different from the Academy of Art.

You can be sure that if you are putting all your energy and devotion into your projects your mentor will see this, and they will know you on a very intimate basis where they will be right there with you rooting for you to improve. You have so much contact with your mentors that they see your project every step of the way, and I think they can tell who is really serious about this and who is maybe not putting in as much effort. "Slacker" students will never take time away from you at AM since with the small class sizes your teacher has enough time for everyone. Everone gets their share, and if you do more work, well then there's more animation there for your mentor to crit on, resulting in longer more detailed crits. And if you are like me who send my mentor emails before the crit you will get an even more personalized crit refering to that email and questions you asked. Plus at the live q and a you have your time to ask a live question. Lately I have been uploading my work in progress and sending my teacher a link, I use my question time at the q and a to get a live mini crit, this totally helps me see if i'm on the right track for the rest of the week. There is nothing better than this program for animation if you take full advantage of the resources available.

anthea
08-27-2005, 08:20 PM
I hear what you are saying... I've always valued a critical critque over that of fluff. I remember when I was in college studying architecture. Me and my friend would always critque each others work. My friend would always say how wonderful everything was, never actually pointing out anything that may need to be fixed. I on the other hand, always pointed out what needed to be fixed. This annoyed her to no end because she wasn't looking for an honest critique, she just wanted some reassurance. Well she would end up going through the critique with the professor and he would point out the very same things that I pointed out to her... things that she could have corrected beforehand. Eventually I just never said anything about her work, so she just waited until the professor pointed it out to her. Some people just operate that way. I'd like to know what needs to be fixed or what could be done better, that's the whole point of having an extra pair of eyes look at it. If all we wanted was a pat on the shoulder, our parents are just a phone call away. Not to say that good comments are bad... just that a heavy dose of reality is usually a better friend in the long run.

Okay... flame away... :thumbsup:

this is great news for you!! you are assured to get practically instant honest critiques, not only from your mentor and compus mentor but also from other students on your workspace area.

most people only leave comments sun-tues, then they are deep into homework mode. but a place i recommend you go is the handy critique forum where you can post a link to your work in progress or say you have a new animation up in your workspace and need a crit. people will get back to you, usually within a day i will have 5-10 messages there (the more friends you are making around campus the more crits you will get, the best way to get a crit is to give one of course!) i use the critique forum at least once a week, i even posted my reference captures to ask for advice about what topic to choose for my animation, use this forum, it works!

AjaBogdanoff
08-27-2005, 08:57 PM
Woo, I missed this crazy thread! I think I had a dream about it at one point last week... though it may have just been a reaction to some of the "rustic" Adirondack cuisine. :D

I've always valued a critical critque over that of fluff. I remember when I was in college studying architecture. Me and my friend would always critque each others work. My friend would always say how wonderful everything was, never actually pointing out anything that may need to be fixed. I on the other hand, always pointed out what needed to be fixed. This annoyed her to no end because she wasn't looking for an honest critique, she just wanted some reassurance. Well she would end up going through the critique with the professor and he would point out the very same things that I pointed out to her... things that she could have corrected beforehand.

Yup, definitely crucial to leave honest feedback on people's work! No one's paying to have their.... backs patted. However, it's also really important to tell people what you DO like about their work! And even if you're not a big fan of the work you're critiquing, you can still be encouraging. We animation students can be fragile at times, and a little reassurance can go a long way! ;)

pmiles
08-28-2005, 05:04 PM
Hey Anthea,

When you went for your Masters at NYU, was it a masters in character animation or just a masters in the generalized field of animation (I think you said it was in 3D)?

What I really liked about the AM setup was that it was focused solely on one thing... which is the foundation for any strong program... focus. A lot of students head off for a Masters degree because they feel they lacked the kind of foundation courses or indepth study that they needed at the Bachelors level. Most find that a Masters program is mostly self-directed study, that it really doesn't make up for the lost foundation material, but rather just gives them time to work on a pet project. I'm generalizing here, not all Masters programs operate that way, and I am not suggesting this is why you went for a Masters degree, just commenting that many people wrongly pursue a Masters thinking that it make up for lost time.

18 months of nothing but character animation is quite a rarity in academics... most programs will always have you split your time across several areas of focus (albeit related areas of study... or one would hope)... which means that your total time of instruction in any one specific area is far less than the certificate program at AM.

Hopefully AM will muster in a new era of education in animation... there is no specific guideline established by the profession as to what constitutes an animator, thus there is no specific requirement that certain aspects be met. As the desire for educated animators grow, the need for established education criteria grows with it. At this time, the only thing regulated in such programs is the general education studies required to qualify for a specific degree title (i.e. Associates, Bachelors, Masters, etc), they have no such guidelines to measure the actual core curriculum by. Times have changed... we're not in a field of journeymen anymore... they are asking for proof of a higher education around every corner... it's about time the profession defines what that "proof" should be and not leave it up to academia to decide for them. AM takes a major step in a new direction in the sense that they are willing to say, this is what we think an animator should know in order to call themselves an animator. I'm not suggesting that AM has the perfect curriculum, I'm just suggesting that it is the first time people in the field are attempting to establish some sort of guidelines for instruction for people in their field... and not leaving it up to some academic in a totally unrelated field to decide for them. Viva la AM!

anthea
08-29-2005, 05:36 PM
PMILES, you are totally right in your assumption that AM is ushering in a new era in animation. I think a lot of people think being a well rounded generalist in a specific software, or having a degree from a "designer label" school is all you need to land a job, and this is not the case with character animation.

In my case, I did a BA of fine arts at Montclair State University in NJ (where I'm from) I did some graphic design there but they had a limited computer art department. Then I decided I wanted to learn 3D knowing nothing about 3d I signed up for the Masters of Science program at NYU. They claimed to have training in every aspect of 3d. When I realized that animation was where it's at for me, I also realized that the "advanced" aniamtion classes they advertised were being "cancelled" every semester due to lack of registration, which was not true since we had enough people that wanted to take them, I think it was the lack of curriculum and quality teachers since no one at the school knew the first thing about animation. So for a year I tried to register for the advertised character animation 2 class and it was never held my whole time at NYU. Now the program is a little different and they have hired some more animation teachers, but for the $60,000 I paid, I barely got a general 3D education, and I was unable to get a 3D job in anything after graduation. And knowing that I wanted to do animation but had no education in it was an excruciating torture for me. I tried to take a 2D animation internship but my animation education lay stagnant until AM. And that's my story.

My Fault
08-29-2005, 06:18 PM
Cool. I see that there is a huge difference in skill level. And I heard their grading is system is more critical than others. Does this mean that a lot drop out? I am actually hoping for more critical standards because at my school they automatically pass anyone that has a credit card.

Before I sign on with AM, I want to be absolutely sure that time for serious students is not sucked away because of slackers. I know that everyone gets personalized critiques, but im thinking if the mentor will be so tired from having to critique one incompentant student, he wont have time or energy for an actually good serious student. the first 2 levels will all be a free for all, but as the program progresses, if the bad student is still in the program, this will make AM no different from the Academy of Art.

Hmmm, I think you need to look at this a bit differently. For example, what if you think you are the good serious student but you are in fact the incompetent? Should the mentor ignore you and only pay attention to the stuents that are already good. What is good to you might be totally different to the mentor. Heck, what if the slacker who spends 10hrs a week is better then the person who spend 60hrs. Who should get more attention?

The difference between here and another school is that they actually do give a crap about you, what you learn and how to help you get better. You are more then a paycheck. I can say this with full conviction because I have gotten to hang out with some of the AM people and mentors. So far the mentors don't try to favor any particular individuals. They try to help their group out with overall concepts but in the e-critiques try to focus on the individual.

What will happen in the end is anyones guess, I'm not sure if they are completely sure how to handle every single potential outcome. What I do know is they will try to do what is the best for each student. In the end, AM will be seen only by how good the students are that come out of this. So that, from what Bobby mentioned to me, is their biggest goal. To make sure every individual is as good as they can be.

mgarward
08-29-2005, 06:35 PM
Heck, what if the slacker who spends 10hrs a week is better then the person who spend 60hrs.
Just to take issue with your choice of words, technically the person spending 10 hrs a week on AM work is spending the expected instructional hours, according to the catalog. In theory, you shouldn't HAVE to spend more than that, if you put in 10 quality hours and don't go too far beyond the assignment requirements. In practice I'm sure most people do spend more time than that.

A 'slacker' would be spending 3-4 hours a week. Or less.:)

Bentagon
08-29-2005, 08:01 PM
Just to take issue with your choice of words, technically the person spending 10 hrs a week on AM work is spending the expected instructional hours, according to the catalog. In theory, you shouldn't HAVE to spend more than that, if you put in 10 quality hours and don't go too far beyond the assignment requirements.Well... that's my definition of a slacker. Someone who isn't willing to go that extra mile.

- Benjamin

AjaBogdanoff
08-29-2005, 08:17 PM
My definition is different... someone who doesn't care enough to even meet the minimum requirements, much less go above and beyond. I wouldn't call someone who's meeting the requirements a slacker, especially if they have other demands on their time.

And I should know... I was voted "Biggest Slacker" my senior year of high school. ;)

mgarward
08-29-2005, 09:22 PM
Well... that's my definition of a slacker. Someone who isn't willing to go that extra mile.
I just needed to point that out because I based my decision on whether or not I could do AM on those instruction hour estimates. I could manage 10 hours per week, work, still have a bit of family life, and be okay. And if that's what is quoted in the catalog, then that should be all you need if you spend a solid 10 hours on it. That's not being a slacker, that's doing what is required.

In reality I'm probably spending more like 20-30 hours a week with AM, and as a result I have less time with my family and less sleep. If I were doing 10 hours I wouldn't call it slacking off, and I might be a lot less grumpy at home, and less prone to ranting in forum threads about one small word at the slightest provocation.:) If those 10 hours were solid hours, spent learning and doing, but that was all the time I could give, then that's not slacking. 20 hours is going above and beyond, for me. Conversely, I could be spending 30 hours doing AM work and be slacking, if I didn't really care about it.

See I'm still going. I need more sleep.:D

My Fault
08-29-2005, 09:32 PM
Just to clarify so Matt doesn't go completely off the deep end and injure himself in a freak refernce video accident, I wasn't saying doing 10hrs a week makes you a slacker, just that this particular slacker, I will call her Baja Bogdanon for this example, only put in 10hrs that week. :D

AjaBogdanoff
08-29-2005, 10:03 PM
I will call her Baja Bogdanon for this example, only put in 10hrs that week. :D

She's a witch!

Bentagon
08-29-2005, 10:14 PM
I just needed to point that out because I based my decision on whether or not I could do AM on those instruction hour estimates. I could manage 10 hours per week, work, still have a bit of family life, and be okay. And if that's what is quoted in the catalog, then that should be all you need if you spend a solid 10 hours on it. That's not being a slacker, that's doing what is required.

In reality I'm probably spending more like 20-30 hours a week with AM, and as a result I have less time with my family and less sleep. If I were doing 10 hours I wouldn't call it slacking off, and I might be a lot less grumpy at home, and less prone to ranting in forum threads about one small word at the slightest provocation.:) If those 10 hours were solid hours, spent learning and doing, but that was all the time I could give, then that's not slacking. 20 hours is going above and beyond, for me. Conversely, I could be spending 30 hours doing AM work and be slacking, if I didn't really care about it.

See I'm still going. I need more sleep.:DYeah, I can see where you're coming from. It's just that I find it really hard to believe that when you are passionate about animation, you can limit yourself to only 10h a week, when at least 2-3h of that goes into non-practice hours. You probably explained it better. It's about how much passion you put into it, instead of what time you spend on it.

- Benjamin

^Abe^
08-29-2005, 10:27 PM
Hey y'all.
I was wondering what you thought of Brian Lemay's (http://www.brianlemay.com/) books. His stuff looks really great and it seems to thoroughly cover the basics. Has anyone read them and have any opinions on them?

Cheers
Abe.

AjaBogdanoff
08-29-2005, 11:09 PM
Yeah, I can see where you're coming from. It's just that I find it really hard to believe that when you are passionate about animation, you can limit yourself to only 10h a week, when at least 2-3h of that goes into non-practice hours. You probably explained it better. It's about how much passion you put into it, instead of what time you spend on it.

- Benjamin


Well, sort of, but that still sort of makes it sound like people who can only spend 10 hours a week on their assignments aren't passionate about their work, when really they might have a full-time job and family that need their time, too... :)

pmiles
08-29-2005, 11:52 PM
Well I don't know about you all, but I've never been able to quite pin down how long I spend on this stuff. I start at some point, then later someone hits me over the head and says that the building is about to be alarmed. I look around and realize that I and the security guard are the only one's left in the building... where in the hell did the day go??? That's usually my problem... not having any idea where all the time went. So don't ever ask me how long something took... I might just ask you what day of the week it is.

Kid-Mesh
08-29-2005, 11:56 PM
Hey y'all.
I was wondering what you thought of Brian Lemay's (http://www.brianlemay.com/) books. His stuff looks really great and it seems to thoroughly cover the basics. Has anyone read them and have any opinions on them?

Cheers
Abe.

I have the majority of his books and the animation books were basically the best. But I didnt really like the others such as creator creation or the set design ones...felt it was lacking in regards to what I was looking for.

But if you dont get them your still set if you have the Richard Williams book or even the revised Preston Blair if your heavy into 2D.

Hope that helps :shrug:

Bsmith
08-30-2005, 12:16 AM
Hey y'all.
I was wondering what you thought of Brian Lemay's (http://www.brianlemay.com/) books. His stuff looks really great and it seems to thoroughly cover the basics. Has anyone read them and have any opinions on them?

Cheers
Abe.

hey, I just got Animation the Basic Principles book for one of my classes. It is pretty good. I haven't read through many other animation book so I can't really compare. There is a crap load of assignments in it with instructions and what not to guide you.

mikefeil
08-30-2005, 01:14 AM
On the topic of time and how much you spend on it with AM. I think one of the many ultimate goals should be for us is to try and do stuff as quick as we can ( I know this sounds bad but let me explain).Think about it, we always hear how important good planning is, this is because you only get a short amount of time when you get into the industry, things must be done quick. I also think the people with the least amount of time (and aren't slackers/passionate) will be the ones who have a system that is absolutely down pat in creating a fairly high quality animated shot.

I think if you can sit down and use those 10 hours effectivily and you have an excellent plan of what your going to do then 10 hours should be heaps.

But yeah, ill probably be spending 40-50 hours too, just thought I would throw a point in too.

^Abe^
08-30-2005, 04:48 AM
I didnt really like the others such as creator creation or the set design ones...felt it was lacking in regards to what I was looking for.

Sorry Kid Mesh- are you referring to his books on designing cartoon characters and creating layouts? What didn't you personally like about them?

Thanks
:D
Abe.

ttesla
08-30-2005, 05:10 AM
It's just that I find it really hard to believe that when you are passionate about animation, you can limit yourself to only 10h a week, when at least 2-3h of that goes into non-practice hours. You probably explained it better. It's about how much passion you put into it, instead of what time you spend on it.
what do you mean by '(non-)practice hours'? is that the time spent on:
planning?
making video references?
observation?
taking notes?
doing thumbnails?
thinking about eeeverything?
or perhaps sitting in front of computer/drawing table and applying all of these?

imho, a whole day in an animator's life is 'practice'. :)

Kid-Mesh
08-30-2005, 12:54 PM
Sorry Kid Mesh- are you referring to his books on designing cartoon characters and creating layouts? What didn't you personally like about them?

Thanks
:D
Abe.


It's not that they were "bad" It just wasnt what I thought they were going to be. I guess I was expecting a bit more. In the end those two books just wasnt what I wanted. Plus I wasnt too fond of those type of characters either, not my bag. The books did offer some good points in a few areas but maybe I was looking more for a "How to draw X style characters type of a deal". Like I said...wasnt what I wanted.

In regards to set design I kinda felt the same way :shrug:. There was some great info there in regards to planning and such but yet it still wasnt what I personally was looking for. Dont get me wrong...Im not saying you shouldnt buy them because they proably would help someone else...just not me.

Regardless, you couldnt pry the animation book from hands if you tried, that was exactly what I expected and was looking for.

Bentagon
08-30-2005, 01:55 PM
what do you mean by '(non-)practice hours'? is that the time spent on:
planning?
making video references?
observation?
taking notes?
doing thumbnails?
thinking about eeeverything?
or perhaps sitting in front of computer/drawing table and applying all of these?

imho, a whole day in an animator's life is 'practice'. :)I mean hours not spent on assingment work. For example, the weekly video, Q&A, forums, chatsessions, etc. Of course you learn during those things, but it isn't actually DOING animation. And I guess all of you guys are right.

And Aja... that was not what I was trying to say. It was more like... even if it are only 5 hours, if they're really focused and passionate, it's better than 20h of just doing mindless animation. And about the 10h with work and family and kids... what about Brian? He's got a job, kids, and still manages to do 40-50h...
Blah., I'm confused... I guess this discussion is endless, since there are sooo many factors playing along. So let's just not try to define "slacker" anymore. We know it when we see it :D

- Benjamin

My Fault
08-30-2005, 02:34 PM
what about Brian? He's got a job, kids, and still manages to do 40-50h...
Blah., I'm confused... I guess this discussion is endless, since there are sooo many factors playing along. So let's just not try to define "slacker" anymore. We know it when we see it :D


Should note the last few weeks the hours have been significantly less, though they have been more intense. I haven't seen me any slackers so far and I really doubt I will. Trust me it is really hard to not want to put im 110% at this place. Everyone is so in to animation and wanting everyone to do cool work. You do occasionaly get those going through rough patches, having a crisis of faith in their abilities but that is normal.

Bentagon
08-30-2005, 02:37 PM
Only 110%? Tsk tsk tsk :D

Believe me, I'm gonna give all I've got. I'll be able to work full-time, except for about 6h of basketball and 17h of nightclasses drawing (both life drawing and gesture drawing) a week.
I'm sooo excited that it's finally really coming!

- Benjamin

My Fault
08-30-2005, 02:38 PM
Only 110%? Tsk tsk tsk :D

- Benjamin

It's because I have been slacking, but only by 30%!

SkyZero
08-30-2005, 03:11 PM
For anybody that submitted their registration info and are paying by credit card - have you been contacted regarding payment?

I was hoping to get contacted soon regarding that. I'm going on my honeymoon at the end of this week and would like to have it all squared away before we leave, because we won't be back until the the 11th and payment is supposedly due by the 9th.

mgarward
08-30-2005, 03:59 PM
For anybody that submitted their registration info and are paying by credit card - have you been contacted regarding payment?

I was hoping to get contacted soon regarding that. I'm going on my honeymoon at the end of this week and would like to have it all squared away before we leave, because we won't be back until the the 11th and payment is supposedly due by the 9th.
You could call the AM office instead and make sure it gets taken care of.

(And... congratulations! :D )

mgarward
08-30-2005, 04:04 PM
I mean hours not spent on assingment work. For example, the weekly video, Q&A, forums, chatsessions, etc. Of course you learn during those things, but it isn't actually DOING animation. And I guess all of you guys are right.

And Aja... that was not what I was trying to say. It was more like... even if it are only 5 hours, if they're really focused and passionate, it's better than 20h of just doing mindless animation. And about the 10h with work and family and kids... what about Brian? He's got a job, kids, and still manages to do 40-50h...
Blah., I'm confused... I guess this discussion is endless, since there are sooo many factors playing along. So let's just not try to define "slacker" anymore. We know it when we see it :D

Well I can't speak for Brian or anyone else but here's my perspective. I have three big parts of my life at the moment: my family, work, and animation. I'm taking AM so that work and animation become the same thing, but for now I need to have a job as I support my wife and kids. So work is about 8-9 hours a day away from home. Another 5 hours or so each weekday is spent with the family and wrangling the kids. Weekends are also devoted to my family as much as possible... they ARE my life, and they are supporting me through this massive carrer change, I need to support them. :)

Once the kids are in bed each night I can get to work learning animation. (And to me, AM is ALL instructional... lectures, Q&As, ecritiques and help and support from fellow students is almost as important as actually animating.) I do like to try to spend an hour or so with my wife without the kids, so she gets some adult conversation and we don't turn into roommates. So... I start around 9, and end when I fall asleep on the keyboard. Then it's up again before 6am when the kids wake up.

So those are my priorities, and that means I can do 10-20 hours of AM per week without being a total grump. I could squeeze in 30 hours and be a total grump, but that's no way to repay my family's support. :) Trust me, I would LOVE to be able to work on animation 40-50 hours per week, and if I had known when I finished High School that this was how I wanted to spend my life, I would have. But that's not the way things worked out and so I have to make the best of things now.

My whole (longwinded) point is, I don't think you can judge whether someone is 'passionate' or a 'slacker' about this based on how many hours they spend doing it. Judge it in their work, participation, attitude to learning, and the effort they put into those hours.

(For the record though, Brian IS a slacker if he's only putting 20 hours a day into AM instead of 23.)

anthea
08-30-2005, 04:38 PM
trust me, mattg is NO slacker. he is one of the most amazing students at AM, the fact that he can do his full time job, spend time w the wife and kids AND consistantly hand in solid polished well thought out animations is amazing to me. You're my hero mattg!! (aka "teach")

most of the students who are juggling fulltime jobs/family/and AM are the exact opposite of slackers, they have to have so much organization and drive to get this stuff done.

Only 110%? Tsk tsk tsk :D

Believe me, I'm gonna give all I've got. I'll be able to work full-time, except for about 6h of basketball and 17h of nightclasses drawing (both life drawing and gesture drawing) a week.
I'm sooo excited that it's finally really coming!

- Benjamin

Ben-
I am also taking extracurricluar classes while doing AM, Right now I am taking a gesture drawing class at Gnomon, where my teacher was a traditional animator at disney for 30 years. next I am taking an acting class where the teacher gave lessons to the animators on Iron Giant.

Extra classes and activites are great if you have time, but I don't think 17+ hours a week of instructional drawing is necessary. You might find once you start AM that most of that time is better used on AM duties. Before I started I had tons of plans for extra things I wanted to take in addition, but had to rein myself in and decided 1 extra class per semester was plenty.

pmiles
08-30-2005, 04:46 PM
Passion is somewhat often referred to as an obsession. No one would be doing this stuff if they weren't passionate about doing it... it's too much work. So I think it's a given, anyone who has ever sat behind a computer for any length of time trying to get a ball to bounce, has the passion for it.

Slacker is a derrogatory word... often used tongue and cheek to ride one's office mates. But by definition, a slacker is someone who doesn't do the work because they know someone else will. They'd rather let someone else do their work for them. That is a slacker. Again, if you even plop your butt down and attempt to do something, you already no longer qualify as a slacker. The tongue in cheek usage is to call someone a slacker when in fact they are an overachiever... the guy that just did 500 pages of hand drawn animation when the assignment only required 10.

So I'd say that everyone at AM is passionate about this... I would also say that some of them are slackers... in the tongue in cheek usage... I would have to say that none of them are slackers in the derrogatory.

As for time spent, no two people work on the same clock. Animation is the one medium that could be tweaked forever. There is a point in time when you just have to say it is done and move on. For some, you have to pry them away from the machine... but it's okay, tomorrow is another day.

My Fault
08-30-2005, 05:36 PM
Yeah, MattG is doing some fantastic work. Always amazed when someone can juggle so much and do such great work. Big WOOT to the Big M!

Personally this semester has kicked my ass backwards and forwards. Between family, work, too many vacations and AM I am a wreck. I don't think ever in my life have I been in worse physical and mental shape. When I was 20 I could live on 2-3hrs sleep a night for months at a time but at 37...OY! I've put on 20lbs in the last 2 months and believe me it ain't "animation" muscle. Watching reference video of myself was painful. Hopefully I can get things turned around here and start next semester off feeling better and back to a good attitude.

That would be my one big recommendation to anyone starting out. Really try to organize your time and make sure this doesn't take over your whole life. While it is important to give it a high priority yoou need to live too. That Brad Bird quote about not being able to give something life if you don't have one of your own is a good one!

Kid-Mesh
08-30-2005, 06:43 PM
Well I'm in the same boat as a few of you. I have a wife and four kids but luckily for me they are all teenagers and in high school. I just turned 35 but started my family pretty early on...like 6th grade or something :scream:.

In regards to time and dedication it really does come down to management and focus. One of the things that drew me to Animation Mentor was the mentorship environment, critiques and so on.

It's one thing to spend countless hours in front of a pc making the same mistakes over and over. And its another thing spending a few quality hours correcting what a professional has pointed out in your work and growing faster as a result.

Honestly, I believe that those individuals who are receptive to criticism and can learn quickly from their mistakes will mature in this craft much faster than someone who has there head down plodding away for hours on end discovering their mistakes by themselves.

Overtime I can see that once a student has built a solid foundation from the beginning that his/her skills will begin to increase expotentially as that person has worked out their weaknesses early on. This will allow a student to practice proper form and technique during their developing stages. In turn the quality hours spent on assignments and such should begin to pay off and show up alot quicker in their work.

As far as I'm concerned right now though, the Winter class cant start fast enough for me...Man how long is it till January?

DigitalToon2
08-30-2005, 07:23 PM
For anybody that submitted their registration info and are paying by credit card - have you been contacted regarding payment?

I was hoping to get contacted soon regarding that. I'm going on my honeymoon at the end of this week and would like to have it all squared away before we leave, because we won't be back until the the 11th and payment is supposedly due by the 9th.

They called me last Thursday...so I'm all paid and ready to go. :thumbsup:

kenshi
08-30-2005, 07:59 PM
just some comments on how much time one should spend animating. there's been a lot of back and forth on this, and there's one thing Bobby said that i think bears repeating here. the LAST thing you want to do is just jump on the computer and move things around. non-animating time is MORE important than the animating time. AM wants us to plan, sketch, THINK, THINK, THINK, plan some more, brainstorm, etc. before even touching the computer!!

you have to know where you are going, otherwise you'll get in the car and drive around aimlessly for hours on end. can anyone say, "pointless"?

and there's no magic "number" of hours. you do what you got to do. some concepts are really hard to get. some take less time to pick up, but all of it is going to take a LOT of time to master. for example, (ready for a reality check?) lots of PIXAR peeps have said they didn't REALLY learn timing til the Incredibles came along... (yeah, you heard that right...)

so getting this stuff in your head is the first step, which is how AM is set-up. it's teaching the ART of animation, from the inside OUT (instead of the usual outside-in academic approach) and letting us apply these principles week by week in our animation assignments.

so forget about logging hours in front of a machine. it doesn't work that way. but there is something to be said for being good and being fast - but that will all come with time. the focus at the beginning should be learning the ART and CRAFT of animation, and devoting as much time as you can and still maintain health, balance, and sanity.

just fyi though, keep in mind that at a lot of big studios (Disney Feature Animation, for example - i have it from a good source) expect 100 frames of finished animation a week. that's roughly 4 seconds. and that's feature QUALITY animation.

but don't think it'll happen the hourly-osmosis-method!!! think smart! animate inspired! don't be another "worker bee"!!

end of rant.

Kimotion
08-30-2005, 08:33 PM
just fyi though, keep in mind that at a lot of big studios (Disney Feature Animation, for example - i have it from a good source) expect 100 frames of finished animation a week. that's roughly 4 seconds. and that's feature QUALITY animation.



FYI, in games you have to work much faster; therefore be much more "efficient" with the time. I find that planning works wonders and actually saves you so much time. More reasons why you shouldn't get into the habbit of being locked to your computer.

Bentagon
08-30-2005, 09:10 PM
Ben-
I am also taking extracurricluar classes while doing AM, Right now I am taking a gesture drawing class at Gnomon, where my teacher was a traditional animator at disney for 30 years. next I am taking an acting class where the teacher gave lessons to the animators on Iron Giant.

Extra classes and activites are great if you have time, but I don't think 17+ hours a week of instructional drawing is necessary. You might find once you start AM that most of that time is better used on AM duties. Before I started I had tons of plans for extra things I wanted to take in addition, but had to rein myself in and decided 1 extra class per semester was plenty.You've got people from the industry as teachers? That's great! My teachers'll be "just" art teachers. But I bet my classes are a lot cheaper: about 200 bucks in total for both classes of 10 months, each consisting of 8h 20min per week. The main reason why I'll be taking these classes is because I'm going completely 2D. I just don't think my drawing skills are where I want or need them to be. I've bought some books already, and started drawing as much as I can. Let's just hope that's enough :)

@Kid Mesh: when I'd be working many many hours a week, I wouldn't put everything in my assignment, because then I'd risk losing my original intention and goal. The hours/practice I'd do extra would be exercices on the things I've learned the weeks before.

@Kenshi: Of course! When I had the pleasure of doing that webcam interview with BOOM for school, he really made sure I'd remember that. Planning is essential! So when I was talking about time spent on animation, I meant including planning, making/searching for reference, etc.

- Benjamin

clockwerkz
08-30-2005, 09:26 PM
Slackers. Interesting word. Well, the bottom line is if you have 100 hours, and only spend 10 of them doing animation, then yes, I'd definitely say you're slacking. But if you work, have a wife and kid(s), and a mortgage to cover, then I hardly consider 10-20 hours slacking if in reality you have like 5 to give.

Bent: You make some interesting points. You mention squeezing every hour that you can into animation, but by the same token you mention that'll you'll also be playing basketball. By your logic, I'd have to say then u should look into dropping basketball and spend that time animating.
This ,of course, is ridiculous, because you need basketball, like many of us need to attend to our familes and our jobs. In fact, if you were to drop something like a sport that you enjoy, then I'd say you'd be fanatical and probably not obsessed with the craft as much as just obsessed period.

I don't see passion as obsession. I see passion as love. Love grows, matures, cultivates.. you get the idea (I'm not much of a poet). Obsession is some sort of derrangement of the mind, I think.

Anyhow, that's just my two cents. If you have 60 hours you can spend animating, then so be it. But remember.. a lot of us are *thinking* animation when we're unable to actually do some work. Sketches while at work, thought processes, even that rarely used word: observation are all important. THis whole weekend I was without power, unable for the first time since I started to turn in my assignment on time. Now while I was cripple without able to use my primary tool, the computer, I still was able to come up with some stuff. in fact, I had this great breakthrough that I jotted on a napkin while on a very short break at work (work has also been especially hectic). But much like the person on a business trip away from his family.. just because I wasn't able to work this weekend, that didn't mean I didn't think about animation. Ok so now this is turning into 5 cents. Ok, I'm really done now.. hehehe.

Carlos

PS- Oh and Bent, you're going to have a blast on AM.. I was only making points as an example, not as an offense. :-)

Kimotion
08-30-2005, 11:37 PM
I think Bent is just very excited and has a lot of energy. So he's eager to go all he can and give it his best. That's why he came up with the 60 hrs.

As for me, I spend just 2 hrs a week on my assignments.

SlipGun
08-30-2005, 11:45 PM
I don't see passion as obsession. I see passion as love. Love grows, matures, cultivates.. you get the idea (I'm not much of a poet). Obsession is some sort of derrangement of the mind, I think.

Well, Mr. Webster defines obsession as "such a persistent idea, desire, emotion, etc., esp. one that cannot be gotten rid of by reasoning" ... and passion as "intense emotional drive or excitement." So I don't see much wrong with using the words interchangably. It comes down to whether your passion/obsession is healthy/creative or unhealthy/destructive.

'least that's how I look at it.

My Fault
08-30-2005, 11:54 PM
The Kimotion does all his assignments real time! If you haven't seen someone animate at 24fps you just haven't lived.

AjaBogdanoff
08-30-2005, 11:56 PM
"Very few cartoons are broadcast live; it's a terrible strain on the animators' wrists."

clockwerkz
08-31-2005, 12:14 AM
I think Bent is just very excited and has a lot of energy. So he's eager to go all he can and give it his best. That's why he came up with the 60 hrs.

As for me, I spend just 2 hrs a week on my assignments.

Hey man, I wasn't knocking the guy..he's gonna be a great addition to the AM family. Well, he already is, with his support throughout. Ok, Mr. Kimotion? What, you wanna fight? Let's go baby! No hitting the face, ok?? :-P

3FnD
08-31-2005, 11:44 AM
I continue to marvel at how some fellow AMigos accomplish such great work in the tiniest amounts of time, and how others with busy lives still manage to find 20+ hours in a week. Everybody's sitch is different and abilty to juggle it all varies. I am struggling to find a working strategy because much of my week is spent for someone else who relies on me for care and none of that time can be used for animation homework. But the real killer is that the little time I do have is often interrupted, except as matt mentioned of his kids, after they've gone to bed. So 12hrs can be rather uproductive and seem like a non-interrupted 6. I sometimes feel like I must be slacking because I just can't spend the kind of time I'd like to on school, and I ponder whether I'm getting enough out of AM in this way or should I drop out until another time. But would I come back or would something else get in the way...then what? So I admire those of you who work fast, lose tons of sleep, or have worked out a way to devote tons of time to AM and still have a life and hope I make friends with all of you so I can learn your secret ways and copy your notes! Esp. Kenshi's. :)

and brian, when are you ever on chat? when are any of you guys?

agreenster
08-31-2005, 05:34 PM
That's actually the biggest deterrent for me to do animation mentor. I simply have NO time. I mean, for the last 2 months, we've been pulling 12 hour day minimums, and most times its closer to 14-16 (9am to 11:30pm or thereabouts). Factor in commute time (1 hour both ways) and viola. So now that the game is done-ish, Im planning on spending time with my wife, working on personal projects, and resume a normal work day routine (9 hours? -CAKE!). And hey, I might even go to the gym.

So all you full-timers (especially you full-time animators) I dont know how you do it.

I do think, however, the law of diminishing returns can be relevant in animation. I doubt that those folks who spend every waking moment learning animation are actually getting 50% better than those who spend a little less time, but also have real lives. I'm preaching to the choir a little bit, but the only reaon we spend so much time at work is mainly because of bug fixing (#1) and the sheer volume of animation to do. But is my quality of animation going to grow by leaps and bounds? Not really. The real growth happens at the "a-ha" moments, and by steady-but-not-overwhelmingly large amounts of animation to do. Once you overdo it, your work becomes sloppy. Thats also why animators grow more by doing small exercises, and not short films.

My Fault
08-31-2005, 05:40 PM
Testify Adam!

In the words of my fellow Pastafarians... Ramen!

coop
08-31-2005, 06:16 PM
As for me, I spend just 2 hrs a week on my assignments.

yeah- kimotion prances around the office in a spandex mocap suit. that's his secret.

Kimotion
08-31-2005, 06:18 PM
yeah- kimotion prances around the office in a spandex mocap suit. that's his secret.

You revealed my SECRET!!! Now everyone will copy!

Thanks....

coop
08-31-2005, 06:19 PM
what? you mean that it's a pink lycra mocap suit. I thought that might be too personal to post on a forum.

Kimotion
08-31-2005, 06:21 PM
what? you mean that it's a pink lycra mocap suit. I thought that might be too personal to post on a forum.

It's not pink. It's FUCSHIA dammit!

ElFuego
08-31-2005, 06:55 PM
I come from a country where we don't need to pay anything to get top level education (Actually we get paid to get education), but if I was an animator I would be willing to pay even that 14K tuition fee for this one.

Speaking of that...

...is there going to be ConceptArtMentor.com anytime soon? ;) With mentors like Mr. Church or Mr. Zhu? :)

stewartjones
08-31-2005, 06:58 PM
I come from a country where we don't need to pay anything to get top level education (Actually we get paid to get education)

Heck! I was born in the wrong country! :eek:

aijoe
08-31-2005, 07:13 PM
hi all.
I have some questions.
1. I just got my registration package and in the check list line #2 it said "filled out personal information details at the top of page2" It doesn't say to fill out on both enrollment agreements. Do I still fill out on both? Because on line #3 it said "Initialed the bottom of page 2 on both printed Enrollment Agreements"
2. Since I apply late can I FedEx my package to them? On the website it said "register mail" I want to use FedEx so that it will get there faster.
3. also, since school is out for the summer and i'm afraid that my high school transcript will not be arriving on time for my registration to AM. Will this affect my acceptant to the school?

Thanks

Bentagon
08-31-2005, 07:39 PM
hi all.
I have some questions.
1. I just got my registration package and in the check list line #2 it said "filled out personal information details at the top of page2" It doesn't say to fill out on both enrollment agreements. Do I still fill out on both? Because on line #3 it said "Initialed the bottom of page 2 on both printed Enrollment Agreements"Would it hurt ;) ?

Actually, there was one thing I found strange on the Enr. Agr.: It said to initial Exhibit D on page X. That page was there, but it were examples of Exhibit C. No Exhibit D anywhere. It skipped right to E.

Hey man, I wasn't knocking the guy..he's gonna be a great addition to the AM family. Well, he already is, with his support throughout. Ok, Mr. Kimotion? What, you wanna fight? Let's go baby! No hitting the face, ok?? :-P Two men fighting over me? Awww... for once I wish I wasn't straight :D

- Benjamin

pmiles
08-31-2005, 08:02 PM
1. The enrollment agreement states "PLEASE RETURN TWO COMPLETED ENROLLMENT AGREEMENTS TO THE SCHOOL" right below the checklist. Not filling out both completely could delay your registration.

2. Registered mail can be sent both priority or first class. That's 1-3 day turnaround, assuming that there is someone there to sign for it when it gets there. You have until September 9th to make payment. If you think your application form is going to be late, contact them to let them know the situation.

3. Your high school may be out for the summer, but the administrative offices are still open for business. Your transcripts will still be processed even though school is out. The transcripts are required to be on record, not in hand at the moment that you enroll. They can always disenroll you should your documentation fail to meet their academic requirements.

The only thing that will delay your registration is your tuition payment and your enrollment agreement (both of them), high school transcripts are separate to that agreement.

aijoe
08-31-2005, 08:03 PM
hi all.
I have some questions.
1. I just got my registration package and in the check list line #2 it said "filled out personal information details at the top of page2" It doesn't say to fill out on both enrollment agreements. Do I still fill out on both? Because on line #3 it said "Initialed the bottom of page 2 on both printed Enrollment Agreements"
2. Since I apply late can I FedEx my package to them? On the website it said "register mail" I want to use FedEx so that it will get there faster.
3. also, since school is out for the summer and i'm afraid that my high school transcript will not be arriving on time for my registration to AM. Will this affect my acceptant to the school?

Thanks

Never mind, I just got a reply from AM. Hoped to see you guy in the fall.

Cheers,

aijoe
08-31-2005, 09:56 PM
1. The enrollment agreement states "PLEASE RETURN TWO COMPLETED ENROLLMENT AGREEMENTS TO THE SCHOOL" right below the checklist. Not filling out both completely could delay your registration.

2. Registered mail can be sent both priority or first class. That's 1-3 day turnaround, assuming that there is someone there to sign for it when it gets there. You have until September 9th to make payment. If you think your application form is going to be late, contact them to let them know the situation.

3. Your high school may be out for the summer, but the administrative offices are still open for business. Your transcripts will still be processed even though school is out. The transcripts are required to be on record, not in hand at the moment that you enroll. They can always disenroll you should your documentation fail to meet their academic requirements.

The only thing that will delay your registration is your tuition payment and your enrollment agreement (both of them), high school transcripts are separate to that agreement.

ok, thanks. Now i'm off to buy a webcam.

SlipGun
08-31-2005, 11:16 PM
...is there going to be ConceptArtMentor.com anytime soon? ;) With mentors like Mr. Church or Mr. Zhu? :)

Sure, who knows?

Someone registered ModelingMentor.com last week. I think I smell something, but I'm not sure what it is.

My Fault
08-31-2005, 11:29 PM
I come from a country where we don't need to pay anything to get top level education (Actually we get paid to get education), but if I was an animator I would be willing to pay even that 14K tuition fee for this one.

Speaking of that...

...is there going to be ConceptArtMentor.com anytime soon? ;) With mentors like Mr. Church or Mr. Zhu? :)

Not quite but check out conceptart.org. Their workshops are fantastic and the net one in Prague looks amazing!

mockingbird
09-01-2005, 07:14 AM
18 day to go!!
what do you guys suggest doing to prepare for AM?
right now im trying to get my drawing skills up to scratch

sternio
09-01-2005, 07:20 AM
You revealed my SECRET!!! Now everyone will copy!

Thanks....

You told your co-workers about how you break into the office late at night and prance around in that pink suit!! Oh man you are so fired.

AnimZiggy
09-01-2005, 09:20 AM
To the UK mentees do you know any good n cheap webproviders? I need to get a website soon...before the course starts

stewartjones
09-01-2005, 09:24 AM
To the UK mentees do you know any good n cheap webproviders? I need to get a website soon...before the course starts

I use 3D Pixel Net. Great service so far, and not too expensive.

http://www.3dpixelnet.com/

mattmos
09-01-2005, 09:24 AM
Whoops sorry Ismini, I was supposed to email you wasn't I? Well I've heard godaddy.com are good, but can't remember who told me that, think its just general opinion I've found on the net. I use e-rice.net and can't say I have any complaints, they have a reasonable and simple service. Not a uk provider though.

AnimZiggy
09-01-2005, 09:50 AM
I just can't believe how mich I was paying in Greece, at least the double/triple price :eek:

Vyntax cheers, it seems pretty good.

Matt I thought you left for Bristol..he he. Yours seems good too, now decisions, decisions, decisions...

btw guys did you sent your CC details by fax or via phone? I'm a bit worried about this one..

stewartjones
09-01-2005, 10:21 AM
btw guys did you sent your CC details by fax or via phone? I'm a bit worried about this one..

If it's for AM you're talking about I normally phone, but I have used E-Mail also!... Probebly not the safest, but ah well! :)

AnimZiggy
09-01-2005, 10:27 AM
yeah, i think i'll be phoning them tonight.
cheers again!

AjaBogdanoff
09-01-2005, 01:23 PM
Hey folks!

Questions about payment and deadlines and stuff should probably go to the actual AM support staff, they know the real answers... we're all just students here. :) AM's phone number is 510-809-1177, and if you call and get Taylor, tell him he rocks. :D

18 day to go!!
what do you guys suggest doing to prepare for AM?
right now im trying to get my drawing skills up to scratch

Scratch, literally! Look, this is how well you need to be able to draw to get by in AM (unless you're actually animating in 2D, for that you need to be able to draw):

http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/alr25/sketch1.jpg

If you can do that, don't stress about your drawing skills. :) With 18 days left to go, if you really want to try to prepare for the program, I'd start thinking about observing poses, since you'll be needing to do that in the first or second week. How do people hold their shoulders when they stand, and how are the shoulders related to the hips? What does it mean, pose-wise, for one leg to be supporting more of the weight? How does excitement look compared to hopelessness? Being able to see that kind of detail in the people around you will definitely help you in the first few weeks of AM, and throughout your entire career as an animator. Plus it makes waiting in line a lot more fun. :D

And if you can find a way to practice it, one of the most important skills you need to have right away is the ability to accept critique without letting your ego get in the way. Check yo' egos at the door, folks! It's going to be hard to hear that your assignment isn't as good as you thought it was after slaving over it for a week, and you really need to be able to let it go and be grateful that someone's taking the time to help you improve. You will have a very difficult time succeeding in this program if you don't respect the opinions of your mentors and classmates. So yeah, maybe stop strangers on the street and ask them to critique your hairstyle or something. ;)

Woo, I'm looking forward to the new semester! :D

Kid-Mesh
09-01-2005, 02:36 PM
So even if you in the 3d part of the program you start off with a bit of 2D animation first?

My Fault
09-01-2005, 02:42 PM
So even if you in the 3d part of the program you start off with a bit of 2D animation first?

Not for the animation part but you are very much encouraged to do a lot of thumbnails for planning so in that respect 2d is important. Like Aja said though you do not need to be a monster artist. Simple is good.

How you do your animation (2d, 3d, stop-mo, old barbies) is totally up to you.

AjaBogdanoff
09-01-2005, 03:13 PM
Yeah, I've done all of my assignments in 3D since the beginning. Most of the assignments require you to plan out your project on paper, though, just for your own reference and understanding. So those crummy little sketches I posted were from when I was trying to figure out how the spine might react to the movement of the hips in a walk. The actual animation was done in 3D, but I referred constantly to that little sketch (which I think might have been on a napkin, I know some of my thumbnails have been) while I was working in Maya. And now that I've finally started using Jason's grease pencil tool, I make a whole heck of a lot of these crummy stick figures (http://belligerentandnumerous.com/stuff/singleideablocking1.mov) in Maya during the planning process. I've even gotten pretty fast at it! ;)

So yeah, unless you're Benjamin ;) , don't stress out about your draftsmanship skills, just be WILLING to draw, and do it enough that you feel comfortable recording information about poses or trying out pose ideas. Which you can do just fine with a stick figure. :)

Rabid pitbull
09-01-2005, 03:23 PM
I like to block out my animations in 2d first. I do really simple stickman animations, mainly to get the main poses and timing sorted out. Really helps me to slove the motions, and definitly gets me moving on the assignment faster. But yeah drawing skill is not a necessary component to learn animation, as long as the drawings make sense to you. Unless of course you plan on doing finished 2d animation like Brian has done.

mikefeil
09-01-2005, 03:52 PM
I think reading illusion of life would be a good thing too, like its not a full on technical book like the animators survival kit, it soughta gets your head into gear, and makes you start thinking like an animator. Thats what I have found, while I have been reading it.

oh man oh man, its finally here ! *girlish scream*

pmiles
09-01-2005, 04:25 PM
I agree, if you are drawing sketches to communicate something to you, then you only need as much detail as is necessary to communicate that information. If you are drawing sketches to communicate something to others, then you might have to up the ante some what. As my sculpture instructor always used to say, smooth doesn't always mean finished.

The Illusion of Life and the Animators Survival Kit are required texts for AM. You will be reading them shortly if you have not done so in the past.

I plan on using the grease pencil tool right from the start. I suppose Jason is spoiled with his Tablet PC, but I will have to do it the old Wacom way for now. Perhaps our resident Cintiq user will expound on the benefits of a Cintiq over a Tablet PC in the future.

In regards to the webcam thing, in general, the two parties must be using the same service in order to hold a video conference... like AOL Instant Messenger for example. What does the school use for live video chat sessions? I have AOL Instant Messenger right now but it really is just a service that I connect through, iChatAV is the software that I use... yes I am on a Mac... muhahahaha...

Anyone get info on getting a student edition of Maya yet? The turn around for new software shipments can get pretty hokey in the fall. I'd like to put it on order as soon as I can but have not gotten a student ID yet... must be that lame essay I wrote... Brian you were right :D

My Fault
09-01-2005, 05:05 PM
Ya never know. This was my essay.

Mah name ees Brain Nicoloochi...eye like 2 aneemayte. I am guhd at aneemayshun. Thanq! :)

As long as you spell sum of the werds ok they are kool with it.

Definitely keep on them on ordering up your educational licenses. I know some of the places are slow as all get out getting them back to you once you order so the sooner you can start the process the better.

pmiles
09-01-2005, 05:18 PM
Kewl, U took kowlidge writing 2! :D

mgarward
09-01-2005, 05:21 PM
The Illusion of Life and the Animators Survival Kit are required texts for AM. You will be reading them shortly if you have not done so in the past.
They're excellent books to have. So far the only required reading has been Illusion of Life chapter 3. I'm up to chapter 5 in that book, and have jumped all through the ASK, but it would still be great to read them if you can.

I plan on using the grease pencil tool right from the start. I suppose Jason is spoiled with his Tablet PC, but I will have to do it the old Wacom way for now.
Ye olde mouse works too. As long as you can tell what the pose/action is supposed to be. :)

In regards to the webcam thing, in general, the two parties must be using the same service in order to hold a video conference... like AOL Instant Messenger for example. What does the school use for live video chat sessions?
AM video chat (the Q&A's) are currently done through the school, using a Flash interface. They may be looking into other methods for future revamps but this works well and doesn't rely on any external service. Otherwise it's up to you. For chatting with other students, you do need to be on the same service. One student has set up a live 'classroom' environment using a couple of free clients that you could try out in the fall.

I think my biggest piece of advice to anyone starting AM is: forget what you know about animation. That's not to say "this is all different" or "AM is vastly superior" or that everything you learn will be new. But if you go in with the attitude that you don't know anything, and want to learn it, you will be more receptive and soak up a lot more. That was my main preparation. That and finding my way around Maya. :D

anthea
09-02-2005, 02:45 AM
18 day to go!!
what do you guys suggest doing to prepare for AM?
right now im trying to get my drawing skills up to scratch

some things to do in preparation:

-sketch life around you, get in this habit, its v useful

-if you haven't already watch old disney animated movies like bambi, lady and the tramp,jungle book, the old classics

-just watch movies in general, not only animated ones, try to understand the cinematography at work

-make sure you have all your computer stuff in order like webcam etc

-start reading illusion of life and get familiar with the 12 principles

-relax, it's going to be non-stop action once AM starts

congrats!

3FnD
09-02-2005, 02:52 AM
my suggestions for incoming students are

1. order your student Maya the moment you get your proof of studentness. when i ordered mine (months ago) Maya went on backorder and I didn't get my copy until the 2nd wk of class...which, as a maya noob was bad because I had no time to learn it. Since then I've had precious little time to learn maya and my work shows it!

2. if you haven't already, go back thru this whole thread and read previous suggestions for new students.

3. even tho only ch. 3 is assigned, and even though some ppl have said the rest of the book is useless to animators (yeah, I was told this), I urge you to read the whole book. besides being interesting, Disney's (as they call it) did more to change animation than just the 12 principles.

4. start looking at the way stuff moves, making mental or paper notes and sketching what you see. This is a fundamental that you will be doing in assignments. Sketching in public takes getting used to for some people, but it's very important.

5. organize your life and also your hard drive(s). as it's been said many times this course is pretty intense and you want to put as much time into as you possibly can to get the most out of it. Plan accordingly.

6. maybe try to get some exercise just in case you get bogged down and can't schedule much once class starts!

7. have a good attitude going in and be ready for ups and downs. You may get discouraged but your classmates and everyone at AM are there (and here!) to support you. Everyone is so helpful it's tough to stay bummed for long! :)

8. put asside some money to buy other books and things that will be recommended as you go. Save up for SIGGRAPH and trips to visit AMHQ in Berkeley, or other events you might want to attend.

9. have fun!

Much of this is already mentioned but I am sometimes the king of redundant. Hope it helps somebody!

Once again congrats & welcome to all the Fallies that will be joining us!

zeroeffect
09-02-2005, 03:09 AM
For those who picked up the student version of Maya, how did the process work? Once I receive my student ID will I be able to order from any academic seller online or does AM use a specific site? I would prefer to use a Canadian site to avoid any duty/taxes that may be imposed if buying from the US. Also, do we have our choice between Complete and Unlimited. Although I don't expect to have much time to play with the Unlimited features, if the cost isn't that much more, it may be worth it.

andy_maxman
09-02-2005, 05:12 AM
And if you can find a way to practice it, one of the most important skills you need to have right away is the ability to accept critique without letting your ego get in the way. Check yo' egos at the door, folks!


That's so true Aja and bang on time with this months newsletter which has an article on 'Studio Etiquette: Keep your Ego in check'.

And kudos! to Vincent Florio.... :thumbsup:

And wow! those pictures at Siggraph are so cool.......*envied*

olioli
09-02-2005, 05:50 AM
Hello AM folks,

I've been following this thread and have been saving some dough to sign up.

I'm a complete newbie to the world of character animation, so new in fact, that i've never done it before. But have a deep desire to learn how to do it.

My concern is, after seeing the student blog excercises I've not only been blown away by the awsome stuff you all are learning, but i have become very intimidated.

There is no way, i could do what i've been seeing on those blogs.

How experienced is the average student that signs up. I have no doubt that if you want to learn how to animate then AM is the way to go, but for those of you that have been thru the first couple of classes, where exactly do you begin.

I think the catalog mentions that you learn the fundamentals and planning, but are you expected to know how to make balls jump around and people walk from the get go.

thanks

My Fault
09-02-2005, 06:35 AM
That's so true Aja and bang on time with this months newsletter which has an article on 'Studio Etiquette: Keep your Ego in check'.

And kudos! to Vincent Florio.... :thumbsup:

And wow! those pictures at Siggraph are so cool.......*envied*

Yeah big congrats to Vincent, the talkingest person in AM! :)

d_jnaneswar
09-02-2005, 06:53 AM
Hi people,

Ive got my payment mail. It asked me to send my cc details. Some of my friends told me that if I pay through my credit card which is from an Indian Bank, I would loose money in conversion... I already mailed AM asking them wether I can pay through my friends CC.. my friend is in USA... doing his masters..

You guys have any idea about this?? As in which one is better?
thanks

mmkelly011881
09-02-2005, 06:58 AM
BOOYA!!

just booked my flight... im hitting up the AM party in san fran on the 10th... THEN.. flying to NYC and hitting the AM East party in the big apple on the 13th!!!

HAHAHAHA WHOAAHAHAHAH!

(insanity)

-matt

Rabid pitbull
09-02-2005, 06:59 AM
Hello AM folks,

I've been following this thread and have been saving some dough to sign up.

I'm a complete newbie to the world of character animation, so new in fact, that i've never done it before. But have a deep desire to learn how to do it.

My concern is, after seeing the student blog excercises I've not only been blown away by the awsome stuff you all are learning, but i have become very intimidated.

There is no way, i could do what i've been seeing on those blogs.

How experienced is the average student that signs up. I have no doubt that if you want to learn how to animate then AM is the way to go, but for those of you that have been thru the first couple of classes, where exactly do you begin.

I think the catalog mentions that you learn the fundamentals and planning, but are you expected to know how to make balls jump around and people walk from the get go.

thanks

I knew nothing about character animation when I started. I am in class 2 and cannot believe how much I have learned in 6 months. I also think coming in without any experience can be a plus, clean slate and all!

Dont worry this program is designed for people like us, they will teach you everything at a good pace so just have to be willing to commit the effort and learn. Go for it you will not be dissapointed!

My Fault
09-02-2005, 07:01 AM
BOOYA!!

just booked my flight... im hitting up the AM party in san fran on the 10th... THEN.. flying to NYC and hitting the AM East party in the big apple on the 13th!!!

HAHAHAHA WHOAAHAHAHAH!

(insanity)

-matt

Oh man, I really hope you are serious. If so that is bad to the bone my man!

mmkelly011881
09-02-2005, 07:04 AM
How experienced is the average student that signs up. I have no doubt that if you want to learn how to animate then AM is the way to go, but for those of you that have been thru the first couple of classes, where exactly do you begin.

I think the catalog mentions that you learn the fundamentals and planning, but are you expected to know how to make balls jump around and people walk from the get go.

olioli
i think anyone could start from scratch and do well.. if you can follow directions and spend the time to work on your projects.. you'll quickly find yourself right up there.. and then people will be saying "There is no way, i could do what i've been seeing" about your stuff.

if you put the time in... the knowledge gained will be great


Ive got my payment mail. It asked me to send my cc details. Some of my friends told me that if I pay through my credit card which is from an Indian Bank, I would loose money in conversion... I already mailed AM asking them wether I can pay through my friends CC.. my friend is in USA... doing his masters..


Hey man, im not quite sure about that.. i would think that if you did it through your bank you would get the best possible conversion at the time but im no financial consultant..

-matt

mmkelly011881
09-02-2005, 07:05 AM
Oh man, I really hope you are serious. If so that is bad to the bone my man!

Totally serious... :)

i get first dibs on making Dakota (http://www.briannicolucci.com/images/pixar/dakota.jpg) stick to the ceiling through the magic of static electricity!!!

mmkelly011881
09-02-2005, 07:11 AM
i want to set up a "slip n slide"

bnic... work those connections and we'll get it to go through the atrium at a well known animation studio

Bentagon
09-02-2005, 09:45 AM
Woohoow! New mentors Kick Ass! Michelle Meeker, Anthony Wong (2D!!), Cameron Miyasaki, Tom Gately (2D!!), Robert Russ,... can't wait!

- Benjamin

AjaBogdanoff
09-02-2005, 12:16 PM
My concern is, after seeing the student blog excercises I've not only been blown away by the awsome stuff you all are learning, but i have become very intimidated.

There is no way, i could do what i've been seeing on those blogs.

Woo, I get to tell one of my favorite anecdotes! :D

When I was in 7th grade I was considering moving up to the more advanced Algebra 1 the next year instead of the regular Math 8 class. But one day, I came across one of the Algebra students textbooks, and flipped it open to somewhere in the middle. And I totally panicked! I didn't know how to do any of that stuff! Obviously I wasn't smart enough to take Algebra!

But I ended up in Algebra anyhow, against my will, where I discovered in the first week of class that everyone else was in the exact same boat as me.... because we were there to be TAUGHT! No one expected us to know how to do the stuff in the middle of the textbook in the first week of class, because we hadn't learned it yet!

So! That was a big eye-opener for me, and I've tried to remember that lesson every time I get intimidated by the work of more advanced students. They were once in my shoes, too!

;) :)

AjaBogdanoff
09-02-2005, 01:25 PM
Dude, Matt, you lucky dog, you get to go to both! :D That's awesome!

So we'll expect you to bring lots of pictures to the meetup on the 13th, then, okay? ;)

This is going to be fun!! :bounce:

pmiles
09-02-2005, 04:28 PM
7th grade... algebra? LOL, try going to college after the fact only to find out that everything below calculus is considered remedial math. I never even took geometry in high school. I was faced with it all while in college... talk about a math phobic's worst nightmare... and my degree didn't even allow me to take calculus for dummies... oh nooo, I had to sit in a class full of math geeks who thought calculus was like chewing bubble gum. In retrospect, I don't know how many times that I have needed to calculate the limits of inifinity while balancing a checkbook ;)

Yep... animators are pretty intimidating... the good news is, you can always animate your biggest foe in the ring and pretty much assure yourself of a knockout... try doing that in real life. I still love the old Bugs Bunny versus the Crusher cartoon... it's a classic.

mgarward
09-02-2005, 05:38 PM
I had some animation knowledge, and had tried traditionally animating a 3 short pieces (not very well), but I actually tried to forget what I knew coming into the course. It is designed for everyone, and will take you through everything you need to know in a very logical way, building from the foundations up. You can definitely start AnimationMentor with no previous animation knowledge or experience.

Kimotion
09-02-2005, 05:56 PM
BOOYA!!

just booked my flight... im hitting up the AM party in san fran on the 10th... THEN.. flying to NYC and hitting the AM East party in the big apple on the 13th!!!

HAHAHAHA WHOAAHAHAHAH!

(insanity)

-matt

Sternio and I will take you around town to all the bars in North Beach and the Filmore and when you pass out, we'll leave you dressed in a pink mocap suit in the Castro. Or AM headquarters, so you'll be there at the bbq when you wake up. Your choice.

agreenster
09-02-2005, 06:18 PM
What, so Im not invited now? Man, I GAVE you that pink suit.

pmiles
09-02-2005, 06:21 PM
Some people obviously have too many frequent flyer miles on their hands ;)

mmkelly011881
09-02-2005, 08:19 PM
we'll leave you dressed in a pink mocap suit in the Castro.

Pink? Damn.. thought it was Fuschia!

Some people obviously have too many frequent flyer miles on their hands

that, or i quit my job and have a need to party like it's 1999... when both coasts are rockin.. dont come a knockin!

Rochester-San Fran-NYC-Rochester BABY!!!

if i had done it two days ago i woulda thrown a San Diego into the mix as well

sternio
09-02-2005, 08:33 PM
Sternio and I will take you around town to all the bars in North Beach and the Filmore and when you pass out, we'll leave you dressed in a pink mocap suit in the Castro. Or AM headquarters, so you'll be there at the bbq when you wake up. Your choice.

We are already taking bets as to what dumpster you are going to end up in.

JSW32
09-02-2005, 09:22 PM
What NYC party is going on? I live in Queens, NY, 10 minutes outside the city. I'm starting AM for the fall semester on the 19th. What exactly is this party, who is it for, where is it, when is it, would i be able to go? thanks! Kimotion are you coming in? binghamton alumni unite!
-Justin

olioli
09-02-2005, 09:50 PM
thanks folks :bounce:

i'm signing up :bounce:

My Fault
09-02-2005, 10:36 PM
Hey Matt, don't forget to RSVP that you will be there for the BBQ. That way they will have enough food to feed the Kelly! :)

clockwerkz
09-02-2005, 11:08 PM
I seriously need to make it over to one of these get-togethers. us Florida peeps are so lame..we need to arrange something over here!

mmkelly011881
09-03-2005, 02:07 AM
we have to risvip?

mmkelly011881
09-03-2005, 07:23 AM
Rsvp Done!

Bentagon
09-03-2005, 11:28 AM
Oh cwap. Seems that I misinterpret the description of one of my drawing classes. So no gesture sketching class :(. Do they really critique the pages of sketches you submit at AM Online, or is it just something to keep you observing?

- Benjamin

AjaBogdanoff
09-03-2005, 01:02 PM
Some might, but neither of my mentors have said anything about my sketches. I really don't think they care about the quality of the drawings, only that you're trying to rough out ideas and observe things.

And of course, if you don't complete them when they're assigned, you're going to have a tough time learning the proper way to plan, which will bite you hard in the second semester. :)

Benjamin, how are you at volume preservation? If I was starting this course in 2D, that's something I'd probably be practicing now... I got several crits on my BB's looking like they were changing volume, and I was working in Maya with the nice S&S deformer they made for us! Even when I do GP stuff, my Stewie stick figure tends to grow and shrink almost double his size over the course of the blocking. :)

Bentagon
09-03-2005, 02:12 PM
Uhm... gut feeling and flipping pages :D
And if that doesn't work, I'll figure out some way. Putting my lightbox on for example.

My emphasis really goes toward good drawing atm. I've been really "slacking" on my drawing in august, when I was working, so I really really need to get in the habit of drawing a lot again. I've been drawing while watching television, or my dog and cat mostly. I'm really not where I want to be, but I'll do just fine drawing Stewie. It's only with real character designs I'd be having problems. That's what I'm working on. I've got two Betty Edwards books, all the animationmeat Walt Stanchfield notes, Glenn Vilppu drawing lessons from AWN, and I'm about to print Andrew Loomis pdf's, and I'll probably be buying some anatomy books, an animal drawing book and a "force drawing" book. But right now, I'm really not where I had wanted to be when I thought about it a couple of months ago. Maybe I should start a blog for discipline ;).

- Benjamin

pmiles
09-03-2005, 04:31 PM
LOL, well unless you are using dynamics, the computer is only going to do what you tell it to do... as far it knows, a ball is as large as the Empire State Building or as small as a pea... it's not going to stop you from turning a pea into a building or vice-versa. Apply a dynamics solution to the same animation, and it will abide by the physical mass/properties of the ball when deforming. Dynamics provide scientific solutions which are technically accurate but visually static. The cartoony approach stretches the laws of physics a little, so it isn't technically accurate, but more visually energetic.

What are the most appealing CG characters? The non-realistic ones. Why? Because they step outside of the everyday... you find doing a plain vanilla walk boring to do because it is so accurate... on the flipside, when you do the walk with character, everything changes... it's fun. Apply this to say painting, you are taught to paint things accurately at first, to capture the colors, the forms, and the proportions as closely as possible... to learn to see. Later you diverge from accurate portrayals of what you see to enhanced portrayals... you accentuate the essence of what it is that you see. Animation is no different. You have to learn how to accurately portray something first before you can exxagerate it convincingly.

Damn, I sound like one of my old professors...

School is going to be fun.... phun.... fuuuuuunnnnnnn.... masochistic fun... woot!

coop
09-03-2005, 06:48 PM
http://www.anamie.com/bookintro.html

not sure if this has been posted, but i've found this book to be invaluable as a reminder of how to draw for animation-

My Fault
09-03-2005, 07:13 PM
http://www.anamie.com/bookintro.html

not sure if this has been posted, but i've found this book to be invaluable as a reminder of how to draw for animation-

And they have a deal for it if you are part of AM. Greaaaat book!

AjaBogdanoff
09-03-2005, 07:15 PM
Hey Coop, that's actually a recommended book for the second semester, and the author, super-awesome Wayne Gilbert, gives one of the lectures! It's AMAZING! He's got an incredible grasp on force and how you convey it in animation... I could watch that video another 10 times, just trying to soak up all the amazing animation goodness. :D

AjaBogdanoff
09-03-2005, 07:15 PM
Back to your desk, Nicolucci! :wip:

coop
09-04-2005, 12:34 AM
oh wow- hope i catch that lecture this round of AM- i've had a lot of friends study under wayne and they're all really good-

bentllama
09-04-2005, 12:46 AM
oh wow- hope i catch that lecture this round of AM- i've had a lot of friends study under wayne and they're all really good-

yeah Wayne is a great teacher...I had him back at Sheridan thae last year he was there...lots to be learned from that guy!

AjaBogdanoff
09-04-2005, 09:41 PM
Cool Coop, you'll be rejoining us this semester?? Woo! You're in for some great lectures! I wish I could go back and do semester two all over again... knowing what I know now, of course! ;)

But yeah, welcome back! :)

Kimotion
09-05-2005, 02:56 AM
We are already taking bets as to what dumpster you are going to end up in.

I say we dump him in the Tenderloin, next to Sunflower Massage.

coop
09-05-2005, 02:59 AM
I say we dump him in the Tenderloin, next to Sunflower Massage.

hopefully not in the pink mocap suit

coop
09-05-2005, 03:10 AM
Cool Coop, you'll be rejoining us this semester?? Woo! You're in for some great lectures! I wish I could go back and do semester two all over again... knowing what I know now, of course! ;)

But yeah, welcome back! :)

Thanks Hall Monitor! Hopefully I won't get detention this term!

Kimotion
09-05-2005, 03:16 AM
hopefully not in the pink mocap suit

Will agreenster want it back after what it will go through?

mmkelly011881
09-05-2005, 03:32 AM
pink? i thought it was "Evening Blossom"??

goddamn im gonna need to paint my nails again

mmkelly011881
09-05-2005, 08:26 PM
hehe.. i may have killed the thread with that last post

back to topic!

back to task!

mikefeil
09-06-2005, 03:23 AM
anyone have any idea when we will get our student id's ?

DigitalToon2
09-06-2005, 03:31 AM
anyone have any idea when we will get our student id's ?

I think when they called they said around the 9th or 10th, but I could be mistaken.

andy_maxman
09-06-2005, 03:44 AM
wanted a quick little info....
has anyone used the wire transfer mode to pay for the classes?
if so, are you given a student id? my bank here asked for one. tried calling am. the voice mailbox was on. is monday (sept-5) a holiday at am?

thanks!

DigitalToon2
09-06-2005, 03:54 AM
wanted a quick little info....
has anyone used the wire transfer mode to pay for the classes?
if so, are you given a student id? my bank here asked for one. tried calling am. the voice mailbox was on. is monday (sept-6) a holiday at am?

thanks!

Today was a holiday so that's why you couldn't get a hold of anyone at AM.

andy_maxman
09-06-2005, 04:12 AM
thanks DigitalToon2.......just made a slight typo with the date....it should have been sept-5th-monday...

so has anyone used a wire transfer mode?
i got a mail from Luis couple fo days ago regarding the details. but it did not mention anything about a student id. though there was something called the 'swift code' which i'm not sure about. so are you given one for the payment process?

3FnD
09-06-2005, 06:10 AM
Benjamin--I've only had a few comments on my sketches from my two mentors all this time, and they weren't critiques they were just "hey thanks for including the sketches" because I'd added them on a few frames at the end or begining of the assignment video. So yeah, you may get oos and ahhs from other students if your sketches are great, but great could just mean they are very clear stick figures that sell the point well.

Coop, it will be cool you're returning! Awesome...but here's something I'm confused about...are you going to be taking the 2nd (Body Dynamics) class or skipping and starting back up in the 3rd class on acting?

Bentagon
09-06-2005, 09:09 AM
Then I guess I'll have to ask for critique :)

Still haven't received a call from AM, but knowing that it was a holiday makes me feel slightly better. I guess I should give them a call tonight.

- Benjamin

ttesla
09-06-2005, 10:00 AM
so has anyone used a wire transfer mode?
i got a mail from Luis couple fo days ago regarding the details. but it did not mention anything about a student id. though there was something called the 'swift code' which i'm not sure about. so are you given one for the payment process?hi andy.
you can contact kelli at kelli at animationmentor.com and she will surely help you on solving this issue. ask her to send you an invoice with swift information included.
student id is completely redundant and needless information in this case. you can get it only when you are already enrolled and payment is the last step in the process. go to your bank and tell them so. and don't worry too much. banks can complicate things with no reason, but that's not the only bank in your town, right? ;) when you receive the invoice, take it with you and ask in a couple of banks is it appropriate for their use. good luck. :)

andy_maxman
09-06-2005, 10:11 AM
hi ttesla,
so is the swift code sufficient enough for the transfer to take place?

i guess i will call them tonight and get things more cleared up.
thanks pal...

ttesla
09-06-2005, 12:31 PM
so is the swift code sufficient enough for the transfer to take place? there are some more information about their account name, number, bank etc. all that info plugged together is sometimes called 'swift instruction'. just ask kelli to fill the invoice with all of the necessary swift information as well and you'll be ready to go. :)

pmiles
09-06-2005, 04:26 PM
I was told that AM would be sending our student IDs this week (week technically ends on Sunday). Yes, Monday September 5th was a holiday in the U.S... our last national holiday just before the end of Summer... Labor Day.

I would suspect that those who have yet to turn in their enrollment packets or make payment, might be delayed in getting their student IDs.

They also said information about ordering a student version of Maya will be provided at the same time.

anthea
09-06-2005, 06:26 PM
BOOYA!!

just booked my flight... im hitting up the AM party in san fran on the 10th... THEN.. flying to NYC and hitting the AM East party in the big apple on the 13th!!!

HAHAHAHA WHOAAHAHAHAH!

(insanity)

-matt

matt kelly: resident AM party animal and BBQ burger flipping champion!

anthea
09-06-2005, 06:32 PM
Hello AM folks,

I've been following this thread and have been saving some dough to sign up.

I'm a complete newbie to the world of character animation, so new in fact, that i've never done it before. But have a deep desire to learn how to do it.

My concern is, after seeing the student blog excercises I've not only been blown away by the awsome stuff you all are learning, but i have become very intimidated.

There is no way, i could do what i've been seeing on those blogs.

How experienced is the average student that signs up. I have no doubt that if you want to learn how to animate then AM is the way to go, but for those of you that have been thru the first couple of classes, where exactly do you begin.

I think the catalog mentions that you learn the fundamentals and planning, but are you expected to know how to make balls jump around and people walk from the get go.

thanks

don't be nervous, many of the students don't have either maya experience or animation experience or both. the goal isn't to have beautiful finished pieces for EVERY project, it is to learn and have fun in the process. I did have some maya experience but no formal character aniamtion training, i had been trying to learn for some time but for me AM was the first tiem I was exposed to the fundamentals and animation principles so i consider myself a newbie. of course there are people who are coming into AM with animation experience under their belt, you cannot compare your newbie work to someone with years of experience, it just isn't realistic. all it takes is a passion to learn animation and to have fun while doing it. don't get too nervous to compare to other too much, that will jsut make you crazy and stunt your progress. the way AM is set up there is a slow and natural progression. you should have seen my first bouncing balls, truly awful stuff, so bad, so very bad. and we didn't move on to full body animation until the second semester. the first semester you will get a great foundation and be prepared for more complicated stuff when the time comes, they aren't going to throw you to the wolves the first week or anything, so don't worry, its a natural progression that is easy for everyone to understand, and its hard NOT to learn if you keep at it.

good luck!

anthea
09-06-2005, 06:38 PM
Oh cwap. Seems that I misinterpret the description of one of my drawing classes. So no gesture sketching class :(. Do they really critique the pages of sketches you submit at AM Online, or is it just something to keep you observing?

- Benjamin

if you want your mentor to critique things they have to be in the assignment or revision area. the public review and sketchbook do not go to your mentors grading tool. so if you want him or her to see something, put in in one of those areas in addition to your usual assignment.

but they will probably just look at your sketches, not critique them.

a great way to incorporate sketches into the first semester projects, is add the initail sketch idea to your pose assignmentsa and show your mentor a side by side of your process. this can also help the mentor know what you were going for in your original sketch of your emotion poses. v helpful

anthea
09-06-2005, 06:40 PM
yeah Wayne is a great teacher...I had him back at Sheridan thae last year he was there...lots to be learned from that guy!


the wayne force class was my FAVORITE OF ALL TIME!

SlipGun
09-07-2005, 01:32 AM
Just wondering: Are there any AM stop-mo blogs?

My Fault
09-07-2005, 01:45 AM
I don't think any blogs but you can check out Justin Rasch's work here (http://www.animationrasch.com/) He has done som FANTASTIC stop mo assignments. Just phenomenal work!

d_jnaneswar
09-07-2005, 03:08 AM
andy: so.. are you wiring it? finally?

I emailed taylor yesterday regarding info on wiring the money... did not get a reply yet.. I am getting a bit nervous as the deadline looms close.. hmm... back to hitting refresh on my mailbox..

3FnD
09-07-2005, 08:38 AM
I don't think any blogs but you can check out Justin Rasch's work here (http://www.animationrasch.com/) He has done som FANTASTIC stop mo assignments. Just phenomenal work!

Yes, Justin's stuff is specriffic...-scentlous... It's awesome. He posts stuff in his AM workspace from time to time (and I've surely missed some gems) I forgot to check for his stuf on his web! Love that dog! Thanks for the reminder Brian!

3FnD
09-07-2005, 08:44 AM
This is just plain crazy. We're about to start Class 3 (and the Summies are about to start 2) and, are you guys with me on this...I am every bit as excited about it--if not more so--as I was when we all started this whole thing last Spring!! That's freakin' ridiculous!

Once in a while my enthusiasm wanes a bit, and then I see/hear/read something like how far we've come and what's around the corner and it all comes right back! I know it seems silly and unrealistic to non-mentees, but geez, this really is a unique learning opportunity in so many amazing ways! Can't wait for whatever's next can you?

Kid-Mesh
09-07-2005, 01:35 PM
Just wondering since Im dont start my AM studies until Jan06 :sad:

For those of you that are in the program, in hindsight if you could have done anything to prepare what would that have been? ( I.E ). Studying blocking techniques, thumbnail sketches, learning how to create and fix rigs, etc...bascially looking for little tips that may have been considered stumbling blocks to others. Time is a precious commodity and any little thing I can pick up now would help.

Aside from the reading materials and such...I also wonder if there where any ephiany moments where you thought to your self "Man, if I would have known X or done/tried this earlier I might have caught on a tad quicker"

I realize that animation is an undertaking and its just about impossible to master it all in a life time thus the thought of the "Nine Old Men"...but I'm just trying to get myself focused in the right direction.

Thanks :)

kenshi
09-07-2005, 04:24 PM
For those of you that are in the program, in hindsight if you could have done anything to prepare what would that have been? ( I.E ). Studying blocking techniques, thumbnail sketches, learning how to create and fix rigs, etc...bascially looking for little tips that may have been considered stumbling blocks to others.

i would say forget about creating and fixing rigs for now. rigs are 100% provided and supported, which was a HUGE reason AM appealed to me so much. now i can focus on race car driving performance instead of spending my time learning how to be a mechanic, to use an obtuse metaphor.

if you're new to Maya, spend some time learning about the graph editor and the timeline - what tangents are and how they can be manipulated. realize that any props you want you are going to have to create yourself, but also realize that the more time you "waste" modeling, the less time you'll be animating. don't get too fancy with props, especially if you're an inexperienced modeler.

and perhaps the biggest single piece of advice i could give would be to in all things SIMPLIFY, SIMPLIFY, SIMPLIFY!!! this goes for personal life as well as AM assignments. keep things balanced. don't sacrifice your health and sanity or you'll be sorry. just be smarter about your TIME and get creative with ways you can utilize opportunities to learn and further your studies. for example, i can't really work on AM assignments at work, but i can certainly listen to the lectures on my laptop while i'm working, or listening to other students' eCritiques. there are also lots of animation podcasts, npr programs, and other online lectures that are available online for free for you to soak up.

also, follow the curriculum. listen to what the founders say - there will be time to break the rules after you've learned them, but for now, set the ego aside and do the best job you can applying the principles you learn in the way it's set out for you. that's not to say don't question things, but just don't skip ahead because you think "i already know this stuff". you'll be totally shooting yourself in the foot if you do that because there's SO much you can get out of the simple exercises.

also realize that when it comes to getting feedback, especially in the first class, your mentor and the roving campus mentors are the ones you should pay the most attention to. you'll get a broad spectrum of comments, and sometimes you'll be asking yourself "who should i be listening to?" when you get conflicting comments. always go with what your mentor says when you have to make a choice that way. that's who is giving you the grade, anyway.

oh, and be patient. you'll have bad days, you'll have good days - you'll have times where you wonder if this will ever make any sense, and other times when things kinda click and start to fall into place. there are levels of learning when it comes to animation principles and it gets deeper and deeper and more exciting the further you get.

lastly, go for solid animation over clever ideas. the more complicated you get without the proper base, the weaker your animation will be. you'll see students go nuts with some of their assignments and you might think, "maybe i'm not pushing things enough" but often you'll find that those complicated setups will totally be missing the point of the assignment. nail the principle and nail it GOOD. once you've done that, then you can worry about being clever, funny, or whatever.

but remember, good animation of something simple will always win over bad animation of something clever if you want to get a job as an animator.

oh, and WORK HARD and HAVE FUN!!!

Bentagon
09-07-2005, 04:27 PM
I've sent an e-mail to them asking whether or not they've received my enrollment agreements, but haven't received any answers yet. Does anybody know when the AM headquarters are open, so I can give them a call as soon as possible? I thought it was 9 am - 6 pm, but I'm not sure.

thanks guys

- Benjamin

Kid-Mesh
09-07-2005, 04:39 PM
....
lastly, go for solid animation over clever ideas. the more complicated you get without the proper base, the weaker your animation will be. you'll see students go nuts with some of their assignments and you might think, "maybe i'm not pushing things enough" but often you'll find that those complicated setups will totally be missing the point of the assignment. nail the principle and nail it GOOD. once you've done that, then you can worry about being clever, funny, or whatever.

but remember, good animation of something simple will always win over bad animation of something clever if you want to get a job as an animator.....


Whoa...that was some awesome advice you gave, thank you very much. And I'd defintely rank my self in the category of wanting to go over the top with things too. Considering what a student is trying to accomplish @ AM, it seems like the KISS method is the one to live by.

I really appreciate the time you spent to respond thanks :)

AnimZiggy
09-07-2005, 04:57 PM
good info kenshi... good idea about listening the feedback at work, podcast etc...cos to be honest with ya, i'm a bit worried how I will handle my time..cheers

JSW32
09-07-2005, 05:20 PM
for some reason the movies on justin's site are not showing on my computer. it says quick time is missing software that i missing on the server. anyway i can view this?

Benman
09-07-2005, 05:39 PM
Ive been animating for about 3 years now and im 15 going to take my gcses this year, i plan on going to a.m hopefully but i emailed them on what qualifications and they dont know wether u need 1 gcse or 10 which is pretty useless because i dont know what grades to aim for. Could anyone enlighten me? (by the way gcse is qualification thing for englanders for people who are confused)

cheers guys

Bentagon
09-07-2005, 05:46 PM
As long as you've finished highschool, you can join. They don't look at the grades. But, you have to be 18, so I'm afraid you'll have to wait another 3 years.

- Benjamin

pmiles
09-07-2005, 06:06 PM
Yeah, anyone know what codec is being used in his movies? Not a true Quicktime codec as far as I can tell... perhaps a third party plugin or created in an app other than Quicktime.

http://www.animationrasch.com/index.html

Benman
09-07-2005, 06:08 PM
cool thanks mate, what would you guys reccomend to do in the mean time? that cud also help my chances in getting in?

shame about the 18 thing i remember reading about it, i think i'll just get a job till im 18 while animating in spare time

thanks guys

Bentagon
09-07-2005, 08:00 PM
You've finished highschool at 15? Sounds strange to me...

Anyways, what to do in the meantime? You can learn A LOT about animation by yourself in 3 years. Get some books like "Illusion of Life" and "Animator's Survival Kit", get more. Take life-drawing classes. Download and be inspired by all the notes that are available on the net, such as on www.animationmeat.com (All the notes on there are amazing, and the Walt Stanchfield notes are some of the best information you will ever find) or www.awn.com (some great notes by Glenn Villpu on that one). Try to animate, but take it slow. First do a lot of bouncing balls, and only much later go into acting stuff. Take a look at some of the AM students' blogs, there you will find some hints about how to build up from bouncing balls to other things. Make up your own exercices. Join forums such as CG-Char, ask information and tips there. And so on and so forth. 3 years is a long time, and you can learn a lot in that timespan. But always remember there's more to learn about animation then you can learn in a lifetime. Try to remain creative in general. Draw a lot.

Hope that's something to get you going :)

- Benjamin

Benman
09-07-2005, 08:48 PM
im 16 in 3 months and im in my last year therfore got about 8 moths of school till ive finshed.

i got animation survival kit a while back its great i need to purchase illusion of life though because i havnt got that, ive been animating for 3 years in 3d and love doing ball animations and making up ideas for balls and stuff and i spent quite a long time on basics and go back to it ever so often, id like to have a go with a ball with tail because that looks fun! ive been part of cg char for a while now and there really helpful there for critques and stuff. I think i need to impove my drawing skills, im ok but not good enough i really want to join some life-drawing classes but dont know where to go to find out where i can take them! are they at local colleages and stuff? im member of keith lango vts series and there great recommend it to anyone they help me alot and really fun to watch!

thanks for help bentagon looks like i'll keep on trucking! and keep learning!

Ben

Bentagon
09-07-2005, 08:55 PM
Yeah, you can usually find life drawing classes at your local art college. At least the colleges that give nightclasses apart from degree-programs. That's what I'm doing :)
If you want to learn how to draw better, definitly also take a look at those Walt Stanchfield and Glenn Vilppu notes I was talking about. And maybe take a look at the Andrew Loomis books you can find through this thread: http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=226083
The link doesn't work, but just copy the "showthread..." part and paste it behind forums.cgsociety.org

Glad I could be of some help.

- Benjamin

pmiles
09-07-2005, 09:07 PM
Benman, the 18 year old status just means that you are no longer a minor and can enter into a contractual agreement without parental signature. They escape all sorts of legal hassels by excluding those under the age of 18. Typically, most high school graduates are 18 or near 18 at the time of graduation... at least in the U.S. education system. Are all your classmates around the same age or are you that much younger?

Keep practicing. Ultimately it's the practice that makes you better at what you do, not the piece of paper that you earn along the way. Look on the bright side, by the time you are eligible, the school might actually be a full-fledged degree granting establishment. Imagine a 4 year program at AnimationMentor.com??? Just speculating, but you never know.

andy_maxman
09-08-2005, 05:05 AM
andy: so.. are you wiring it? finally?


nope.....some issues....so i am sending them a draft......

hope things turn out smoothly for you....goodLuck!

kenshi
09-08-2005, 07:15 AM
anybody gone through the new 10th anniversary toy story dvd? can't wait to hear what john lasseter has to say with 10 years of experience in between.

AjaBogdanoff
09-08-2005, 05:45 PM
Wow, 10 years? Anyone else feel a little... dated? :argh:

:p

Benman
09-08-2005, 05:53 PM
Benman, the 18 year old status just means that you are no longer a minor and can enter into a contractual agreement without parental signature. They escape all sorts of legal hassels by excluding those under the age of 18. Typically, most high school graduates are 18 or near 18 at the time of graduation... at least in the U.S. education system. Are all your classmates around the same age or are you that much younger?

Keep practicing. Ultimately it's the practice that makes you better at what you do, not the piece of paper that you earn along the way. Look on the bright side, by the time you are eligible, the school might actually be a full-fledged degree granting establishment. Imagine a 4 year program at AnimationMentor.com??? Just speculating, but you never know.

well at england we do senoir school and that finshes when most people are 16 and then ur finshed school, but u are able to ither stay on to do a-levels and then when u finshed that ur 18 and u can go uni if you want. but most people finsh at 16, i mite stay on to do a levels tho im not sure because i cud spent the time animating instead but to be honest they dont help u much in 3d anyway its about skill/talent not qualifications

d_jnaneswar
09-08-2005, 06:44 PM
there are also lots of animation podcasts, npr programs, and other online lectures that are available online for free for you to soak up.


Can some one give some links?? I know animation podcast and eyeonanimation. are there any one else? what about links to lectures and what is npr? Just have a feeling that im missing a lot.

Bentagon
09-08-2005, 07:34 PM
well at england we do senoir school and that finshes when most people are 16 and then ur finshed school, but u are able to ither stay on to do a-levels and then when u finshed that ur 18 and u can go uni if you want. but most people finsh at 16, i mite stay on to do a levels tho im not sure because i cud spent the time animating instead but to be honest they dont help u much in 3d anyway its about skill/talent not qualificationsMmmh.. if I hear that, I think that the a-levels degree is the equivalent of a high school diploma, and not the one you are finishing now, since with a highschool diploma you can go to college/uni, but not with your degree. You'd best check at the nearest American embassy, or through the list AM Online links to (I think the link's in the FAQ).

I don't think you should stay home from school for animation. If you need a job to support your family or something like that, agreed, but I don't think you should quit school for animation. Who knows, maybe there is no AM Online anymore in 3 years, or maybe you can't afford it anymore by then, so then there's still the possibility to go to a (cheaper) uni/college.

- Benjamin

stewartjones
09-08-2005, 08:26 PM
Ben has it right actually. Us in the UK finish our high-school equivelants at 15/16. Just they are called GCSE's over here!

DON'T DO A-LEVELS! I suggest going to college to do a diploma in something more fun. I hated my A-Levels, oh, and everyone passes, so they don't count for much at all these days!

Benman
09-08-2005, 08:27 PM
yeh thats very true actually, on the list for equvilant high school thing on AM it says gcse also i emailed now and got reply saying that they wernt actually sure how many gcses im ment to have them selfs for it so its all a bit confusing, i think i mite just carry on school and get part time job so can get the money for ither AM or bournemouth uni. But im not the sharpest knife in the draw :P unless its creative.

stewartjones
09-08-2005, 08:29 PM
yeh thats very true actually, on the list for equvilant high school thing on AM it says gcse also i emailed now and got reply saying that they wernt actually sure how many gcses im ment to have them selfs for it so its all a bit confusing, i think i mite just carry on school and get part time job so can get the money for ither AM or bournemouth uni. But im not the sharpest knife in the draw :P unless its creative.

Hey Ben, I think it's either 4 or 5 GCSE's @ C grade or above. So, look at entry requirements for colleges etc. I think it works out like that.

-Stu

Benman
09-08-2005, 08:32 PM
hey cheers for that stu, i read ur blog alot btw :)

im not overally keen at all at doing ALeVeLS* and when it comes to i.t the teachers dont know what there talking about, eg im doing a gnvq intermediate for i.t which is highest u can do for my age and we just started a graphics project and i quote "Ok so i want you to make ur own design of school logo, in word" yes word microsoft word, its a joke they teach bad habbits and send people out its a disgrace, i suppose i was a bit dissapointed because i love photoshop tho heh

what diplomas do u recomend at college? we have a few colleges here at northampton.

cheers man

stewartjones
09-08-2005, 10:10 PM
I hear ya on that Ben. IT is ALL microsoft products from what I can remember!

Cheers for checking out the Blog, I promise a full overhaul in the next week! :thumbsup: New site too! YAY!:bounce:

As for courses, I did a Multimedia Design Diploma, with a Graphic Design NCFE and a Practical Art & Craft NCFE too, all of which were pretty neat. It had life drawing, 3D, websites, animation, and loads of design which I feel help out for animation stuff. BUT!!! There are courses for illustration and animation which I think would be a very awesome choice. Any would be better than A-Levels in my opinion. Maybe check out your local college, at ucas.com or something?

Hope that helps out some. My main advice, do something that your gonna have some fun at! :D

Bentagon
09-08-2005, 10:36 PM
PAGE 400! Wooo!

- Benjamin



PS: Sorry, couldn't help myself. I was just officially enrolled.

Sean MacNeil
09-08-2005, 10:42 PM
Now that my first term at AM is in the books, I just want to say a big thanks to all of my fellow AMer's for an awesome and fun and truly inspirational semester of learning! It was a great three months and I learned a ton about animation from everyone at AM. You guys inspired me with your work each and every week and continue to inspire me with your love and dedication to this awesome art form. So, THANK YOU!

I'm really looking forward to seeing some more wicked animation next term from all of my fellow classmates in the body mechanics class, from all you cool cats in the intro to acting class (I know you guys are going to bring the house down with your stuff and I truly can't wait to see what you come up with,) and from the new crop coming in for the foundation class (you guys are going to luv this school!)


Later AMer's,
Sean.

kenshi
09-08-2005, 11:33 PM
hey benman, here are a few of the links i was talking about:

Brad Bird interview on NPR (National Public Radio) (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4578508)
Discussion with Ed Catmull, Brad Bird, Alvy Ray Smith, and Andrew Stanton (http://www.computerhistory.org/events/index.php?id=1114720561)

pmiles
09-08-2005, 11:57 PM
Wow, the U.K. sure has a different education system... what do you all do until you are 18? Or are 16 year olds considered of legal age?

jugger
09-09-2005, 12:10 AM
great posting sean!! i really can second all your feelings and thoughts.
i myself cant wait to get finally the acting classes, thats what i was waiting fore. passing the basics and learning things you cant read anywhere, things where you just need you kick ass mentors and these awsome lectures!
it gets better and better!

cya all in 2 weeks :)

mmkelly011881
09-09-2005, 12:26 AM
heres a few more interviews

http://www.sabudesign.com/mostlycloudy/mc/blog/2005/04/animation-interviews.html

stewartjones
09-09-2005, 10:39 AM
Wow, the U.K. sure has a different education system... what do you all do until you are 18? Or are 16 year olds considered of legal age?

Legal age for sex drugs, and rock 'n roll... well, the sex part anyway! haha! :thumbsup:

Most people stay on after 16 and go for A-Levels, which is like a higher-education sorta thing. Then go to University at 18 to do a degree... That's if they choose to do education. Others go to college, and the rest go get a job at 16!

It be a keraaazy system! :D

pmiles
09-09-2005, 04:06 PM
The U.K. must be some wild place then... LOL

I just received my student ID and I think I have successfully set up my account, but I was not able to register for classes because it said "Sorry your account has been put on hold we are currently processing your payment" on step 1. Am I supposed to be able to register for classes or does setting up one's account do the same thing?

The email they sent me said that my payment was already successfully processed (my bank has already cleared the check as well), so now I don't know if something worked or didn't work. They did say that we won't be able to login until the first day of class (September 19th).

Is this how it worked for the other new students? Anyone else new to the Fall class with similar experiences?

stewartjones
09-09-2005, 04:07 PM
Yea, worry not! The student ID thing never worked for me either, but you will be able to log in no problem when school starts! :bounce: :thumbsup:

mikefeil
09-09-2005, 04:36 PM
k sweet just got my student ID too...9 more days peoplE!!

AnimZiggy
09-09-2005, 04:41 PM
:bounce:i got mine too! wohooo.

pmiles
09-09-2005, 04:55 PM
So you don't actually register for classes then? How do you differentiate the 2D from the Stop-Mo from the 3D? Do they just listen to the appropriate lectures? Or does everyone get the same lectures, irregardless of which track you take?

Also, anyone get any word on getting a student version of Maya yet? In the Fall, getting a shipment of new software within 2 weeks can be tricky... we're down to 9 days.

LOL... panic already... this is surely a good sign.

My Fault
09-09-2005, 04:59 PM
So you don't actually register for classes then? How do you differentiate the 2D from the Stop-Mo from the 3D? Do they just listen to the appropriate lectures? Or does everyone get the same lectures, irregardless of which track you take?

There are no separate tracks. This is all about animation so it doesn't matter what medium you use. The principles are the same regardless.

While I am glad to have this week break I do miss the normal day to day action of class!

AnimZiggy
09-09-2005, 05:00 PM
LOL... panic already... this is surely a good sign.

gosh talking about panic. I stil haven't got a webspace to stream my .avis for the course...arhhhh.

pmiles
09-09-2005, 05:01 PM
LOL, animation withdrawal... I'd say anything that you miss, is worth holding on to.