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JoePesci
05-25-2004, 07:36 PM
I'm totally new to 3D so i don't have any knowledge. So my question is which books are recommended for people who are new to this?

I thought i'll get these two (because i don't want to rely on only one book):

█ Essential LightWave 7.5
█ Lightwave 3D 7.5 for Windows and Macintosh

Are these books a good choice? (they must be for LW 7.5)

thanks.

Dennik
05-25-2004, 09:55 PM
Inside Lightwave 3D by Dan Ablan

webshot
05-25-2004, 09:56 PM
yup I was going to say that too. I am just starting and a mixture of that book and the manual that shipped with LW is keeping me above water. There are a bunch comingout for LW 8 that look tasty but I think I may get some training materials from here www.3dgarage.com

Nonproductive
05-25-2004, 11:25 PM
I'm going to be the dissenting voice here...

Both are really *must have* books for Lightwave

BUT

I found Inside Lightwave to be very overwhelming at first.
Essential Lightwave is more basic but much more accessable.

Depending on your experience (I am a very casual hobbyist) I would suggest starting with Essential Lightwave then moving "up" to Inside Lightwave once you have the basics down.

my .02

SplineGod
05-25-2004, 11:28 PM
Wordware has a lot of LW books either out or on their way out...I think 11 or so total. I also have several hours of free video tutorials on my site. :)

chikega
05-26-2004, 12:21 AM
Now this may seem kind of strange to some. But I always like to go outside the box every once in awhile. I can pick up some great ideas from perusing Maya and Studio Max books while at Border's or Barne's & Nobles. :thumbsup:

sebek27
05-26-2004, 12:45 AM
I recommend Essentials book for newbies, my favorite LW book so far. Then for more in depth stuff, there is Inside LW and of course more books from Wordware, there is one on lighting and one on texturing

webshot
05-26-2004, 01:25 AM
I never see any of those WordWare book in my local Barnes and Noble. You can only get them online?

TheAlfheim
05-26-2004, 01:33 AM
The other thing to consider is "where do your interests lie"?

If you're interested in creating static images, that'd be one set of skills, whereas animating is another.

If its possible, try to narrow down what it is you're trying to achieve with LightWave, and get books which have a good focus on that area.

And just because you start off learning about, say, modeling, doesnt mean you cant pick up animation later

Good luck.....

LittleFenris
05-26-2004, 04:49 AM
Originally posted by webshot
I never see any of those WordWare book in my local Barnes and Noble. You can only get them online?

I've seen the Lightwave Lighting [7.5] and the Essential Lightwave [7.5] at Barnes and Noble a few times. Most of the others are so new that they aren't out yet, or are just coming out now. I've also heard that B&N has there own publishing division now so they are cutting back on non-B&N publishers in some of the smaller markets (like computer books). I've just bought all my Wordware books straight from Wordwares site.

LittleFenris
05-26-2004, 05:14 AM
Originally posted by Insider
Inside LightWave 8? You have my new book? As far as I know, it's not out until June. Well, no worries. You can write the next one.

Typo, sorry. Oh, and I apologize for the bad comment about Dan's books in the previous post (which I deleted). It was made while being attacked by others in another thread, which isn't the best way to approach the situation.

neone
05-26-2004, 08:38 AM
i'm a newbee myself (doing it a bit more then a month now and i bought 2 books.
Inside lightwave was the first book but i found it very difficult to start with.
So i bought another (lightwave primer) just to start out.
Both books are helping me alot.
lightwave primer isn't a book that u will use for a long time. But it's exelent to get you into gear.
And inside lightwave is a book that you would use all the time i think. Great and challenging tutorials and great as a reference guide.

i hope this helps you ;)
good luck with it :)

gerardo
05-26-2004, 10:17 AM
If you are beginning with LW, a generic book is well. But if you already manage something the software, I would recommend you that you invest in specialized books (texturing, illumination, character animation, and so) :)


Best Regards,



Gerardo

colkai
05-26-2004, 12:46 PM
Definetly any of Dans 'Inside' books, I have both [6] and [7], whilst some things are release related, a lot of info is relevant across the baord.
Nicks book on lighting in LW8, again, a lot is still relevant in 7.5
Also Leighs texturing book, which I've just got and looks tres cool!

Finally, don't be afraid to check out older books on the discount shelves. When it comes to modelling etc.. even books written for LW5 are still valid, Dans Power Guide has some useful stuff that is handy to know, even though it may be seen as "out of date". Same goes for Dave Jerrards Applied 5.6 - one heck of a book, (as is the 6.5/7 version)

Truthfully, you could easily spend a fortune, so I'd also consider printing out and working through the tuts on Newteks site as well to save money.

..All this doesn't even take into account the books due for launch, a positive plethora of books these days, so I agree with what someone else said, depends if you want everything or specifics.

Me, I kinda buy what I can afford... an' sulk when I can't afford 'em :D

Insider
05-26-2004, 03:58 PM
Inside lightwave was the first book but i found it very difficult to start with.

I've heard that from people, so the new Inside LightWave 8 book is totally new, and great for beginners.

kurv
07-13-2004, 09:34 PM
Wordware Publishing has taken the approach that each topic in LightWave should be a book in itself, Texturing, Lighting, Modeling, Animating, etc.

The Essentials book is LightWave's best selling introductory title while our Lighting, Texturing, Character Animation and Tips books are on the Top 5 best selling of all 3D Graphics books at Amazon.com...

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/new-for-you/top-sellers/-/books/4135/ref=pd_ts_b_nav/002-5530936-7062459

For that matter check out how many LightWave title take up the top 20... Maya and 3ds max better watch out... LightWave owns the 3D Graphics book market... and Wordware has 6 out of the top 10 ;)

twidup
07-13-2004, 10:12 PM
I would have to support Dan on this. for a general LW book, I would go with the Inside LW series.

Now, once you are familiar with LW, and want to focus on specific topics, I might pick up one of wordware's books then...but I would start with Inside Lightwave

-Todd
creature TD
a top secret studio located in norcal
"from turret of a republic gunship"

hrgiger
07-13-2004, 11:01 PM
I would definately say the Inside LIghtwave series has been my favorite. I can't wait to get my Inside Lightwave 8 in the mail...

Joker II
07-14-2004, 01:11 AM
I've heard that from people, so the new Inside LightWave 8 book is totally new, and great for beginners.Yihaaaaaaa, I'm a lucky or what, I ordered it and as we speak I saw online that it is shipping :thumbsup:

One thing Dan, try and find a descent distributor in Europe so that we can buy 3DGarage localy :buttrock:

See ya,
Joker :)

SplineGod
07-14-2004, 05:54 AM
I like the approach Wordware has taken. Ive never been interested in buying most Lightwave books in the past mostly because they were too basic for my taste and the one or two chapters that looked interesting were never covered in enough detail. Theres a lot of things in Lightwave to learn and sometimes its easier to focus on specific topics and become aquainted with those before moving onto other things. Trying to learning modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, animating, particles, volumetrics, rendering etc. is a bit much. :)

fwtep
07-14-2004, 07:53 AM
I like the approach Wordware has taken. Ive never been interested in buying most Lightwave books in the past mostly because they were too basic for my taste and the one or two chapters that looked interesting were never covered in enough detail. Theres a lot of things in Lightwave to learn and sometimes its easier to focus on specific topics and become aquainted with those before moving onto other things. Trying to learning modeling, texturing, lighting, rigging, animating, particles, volumetrics, rendering etc. is a bit much. :)When I learned LightWave I had one book, the manual, and it was all I needed to get up to speed fast enough (about 5 weeks) to get a job at a major studio (Amblin/Universal). Of course, back then it was easier to get a job because there weren't as many people vying for them, and it was easier to learn LW because it didn't have half the features it does now. BUT, a well written all-in-one book is, in my opinion, the best way to go precisely for some of the reasons you say that separate books are better. (And frankly Larry, you've "never been interested in buying most Lightwave books" because when you learned LW there weren't any books, and now you don't need them. Of course they're not going to have much helpful stuff for you. I HOPE they don't have much helpful stuff for you. If they do, there's a problem. But you're not the average person considering buying them.)

If someone's new to LW, then there's no way they'd know which of those 11 specialty books to get. And it wouldn't be good to start that way. They're better off with an all-in-one book to get started, because so many aspects of LW are interrelated-- modeling/rigging/texturing, rigging/animating, texturing/lighting, etc. You can't really learn about rigging (for example) without also covering modeling and animating. And you can't learn about texturing without covering lighting. Etc.

The books that are out now are pretty damn good, so they'll take people a very long way. In fact, they can probably get by with an all-in-one, then avail themselves of all the free stuff that's online, including, of course CGTalk. After all, once you reach a certain level (and assuming you do actually have a talent for it), you find that the rest comes easier and easier, so you probably wouldn't need to buy anything more advanced. It's nice to have extra books to thumb through though, if you've got the money to burn and there's no new graphics card or video game out. (Where the hell is Doom 3??????)

So to sum up the rambling, the books that are out there now are great, whether the all-in-ones like Dan Ablan's, or the specialty books of Wordware. But for beginners/intermediate users, I think the all-in-ones are the best bang for the buck. And after all, there's nothing like a good bang!

Fred

Dreamabyss
07-14-2004, 08:36 AM
I've heard that from people, so the new Inside LightWave 8 book is totally new, and great for beginners.

Care to elaborate? I have Inside Lightwave 7 and found it to be a bit daunting at first. Not to mention really heavy and not a good book to read in bed. I would consider purchasing your new book when it comes out if I know it won't be a rehash.

HolgerL
07-14-2004, 01:50 PM
Can someone define how experienced a lightwave hobbyist should be to buy Inside Lightwave 8 instead of Essential Lightwave?

Thanks. :)

SplineGod
07-14-2004, 04:48 PM
When I learned LightWave I had one book, the manual, and it was all I needed to get up to speed fast enough (about 5 weeks) to get a job at a major studio (Amblin/Universal). Of course, back then it was easier to get a job because there weren't as many people vying for them, and it was easier to learn LW because it didn't have half the features it does now. BUT, a well written all-in-one book is, in my opinion, the best way to go precisely for some of the reasons you say that separate books are better. (And frankly Larry, you've "never been interested in buying most Lightwave books" because when you learned LW there weren't any books, and now you don't need them. Of course they're not going to have much helpful stuff for you. I HOPE they don't have much helpful stuff for you. If they do, there's a problem. But you're not the average person considering buying them.)

If someone's new to LW, then there's no way they'd know which of those 11 specialty books to get. And it wouldn't be good to start that way. They're better off with an all-in-one book to get started, because so many aspects of LW are interrelated-- modeling/rigging/texturing, rigging/animating, texturing/lighting, etc. You can't really learn about rigging (for example) without also covering modeling and animating. And you can't learn about texturing without covering lighting. Etc.

Fred
In those days Lightwave was FAR more simplistic then it is now. In those days it was possible to master several different 3D apps because most of them combined still didnt have the feature set that LW by itself has now. The majority of the modeling tools were primitives, points, polys and splines. There was no opengl either. I still remember when bones first showed up. The vast majority of people using LW in those days were doing hard surface modeling, simple texturing (no UVs), basic lighting and rendering.

Each new version of LW changed things in such a way that many times it was like learning a new app. With the complexity of Lightwave now its much more difficult to be a generalist with it. Thats why a few years ago with LW 5.6 or previous I might have recommended more general books to people. Now theres so many features that its overwhelming. Now I recommend that people focus on a topic like modeling first. Thats typically the easiest thing to grasp first.

I see a lot of people flounder at this because they dont focus and try to learn too many things at once. Learning Lightwave now is much different then learning on previous versions. :)

fwtep
07-14-2004, 07:21 PM
I see a lot of people flounder at this because they dont focus and try to learn too many things at once. Learning Lightwave now is much different then learning on previous versions. :)As I said, LW is difintely a bigger beast now. But with any program, the more you learn, the faster you learn. You know, you learn one little thing and they you're like, "A ha! Now I understand what this other thing must be!" So if the program is 5 times bigger than it was, it doesn't necessarily mean it will take 5 times longer to learn.

Now, back to the question of books. Here is my opinion, and really, we're just talking opinions here-- there's no real right or wrong.

All-In-One Books (like Inside LW8): A book like this (in addition to the manual) will get you a long way. It'll introduce you to all aspects of the program and give you an important foundation upon which to build. And from what I've been reading here and in other reviews, it goes pretty far beyond the basics. After learning this stuff you can choose where to go next. If modeling is your thing, grab a modeling book, if rigging is your thing, grab a rigging book, etc.

Specialty books: Disclaimer: I've seen some all-in-one books but with the exception of Leigh's texturing book (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1556222858/qid=1089828588/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3884802-6435918?v=glance&s=books) (which seemed great), I haven't actually looked through any other specialty books. I'm assuming they would live up to expectations though.

OK, with that disclaimer in mind, I think that specialty books could be a good second step. They can be useful if you know what you want to do. But that's the problem with them as a first step (i.e. instead of an all-in-one)-- if you're really new to 3D, you can't know which aspect you'll like. Sure you might say, "I want to get LightWave and become a modeler," but once you get LW and use it you might find that, for example, rigging is far more interesting and exciting to you. And I've seen that happen a LOT. If you run out and buy a specialty book, it could end up being an expensive mistake. In other words as a complete beginner, you can't go wrong with an all-in-one, but you might with a specialty. That has nothing to do with the quality of the specialty books-- as I said, I'm working under the assumption that they're good-- it has do to with the needs of the user.

I hope that all makes sense; I haven't finished the coffee yet. :)

Fred

leigh
07-15-2004, 01:11 AM
if you're really new to 3D, you can't know which aspect you'll like.
I totally agree. (And thanks for the compliment on my book - I got your email the other day too, haven't had a chance to reply to it yet)

My publisher may hate me for saying this (sorry Wes!), but books like the Inside LightWave series are absolutely ideal for beginners. I know that Wordware has the Essential LightWave books, which I am sure are cool, but I am not entirely sure what the content of them actually is, so I cannot comment on their usefulness for absolute beginners as I don't have the foggiest idea as to what is in them.

I had a copy of Inside LightWave 6 when I first had to start using LightWave at work, and I found it extremely useful - whenever I had a question, I'd look it up in the book and 99% of the time I'd find an answer. Another plus factor for those books is that a total 3D beginner can pick it up easily, and not just a beginner to LightWave.

I think it's very important for people to start off with a slightly broader look at the art, and then later on decide to specialise if they wish. The nice thing about the Inside series is that the logical progression of the book from basic modeling through to all the rest is a good way to learn. Actually, the Inside series for all packages has always had a great high standard - I learned 3D initially at college where my textbook was Inside 3D Studio Max 2.5.

It's cool that there are so many training materials (books, DVDs, videos, etc) available these days - people have a lot to choose from. But I maintain my opinion that it is best to start off with a general book than anything overly specialised, as the beginner could very well end up confused and with an imbalance in their skills.

FunBucket
07-15-2004, 01:36 AM
Hey Leigh, what do you think about Dan Ablan's courseware on 3dgarage.com? So far everyone I've asked has raved about it. So that could be a good sign!

Also, what do you think about Larry Shultz's courses? I know both of these guys are on here, so maybe they both can throw me a sales pitch :thumbsup: And possibly a discount? :D

Please, Splinegod? PLEASE!? I'll be your best friend...

FunBucket
07-15-2004, 01:44 AM
And yes, I realize these aren't books. I just thought I'd throw it out there though. Don't punish me!

SplineGod
07-15-2004, 01:47 AM
I guess where Im coming from is that theres a difference between getting an overview of 3D vs actually trying to learn it in a serious way. Most of these books are not setup as a course that takes the end user from one level to another in a method/logical way.

Most people dont have a choice about specializing...thats the way the industry is. Most of the time what I see on demo reels are people attempting to do more then what they are really good at. It is better to shoot for becoming good at one thing at least IMO.

Even books that focus on modeling can start very broad and end up quite specialized or advanced. I know people who even specialize in certain types of modeling such as mechanical/hard surface, environmental, architectural, character etc etc. Most studios are setup so that people are divided up into specialities.

Ive found that most people generally get modeling before they get texturing, lighting, or animating. :)

Gutterboxkid,
Im offering significant discounts on all of my courses and CD to people purchasing the Lightwave 8: 1001 Tips and Tricks (http://www.wordware.com/tnt)

You can check out my support forums for my students here:
http://www.learningstop.com/cgi-bin/dcforum/dcboard.cgi
login - guest
passwd - guest

That will give you a very good idea of what you can expect in terms of support.
I also have 4 hours of free video tutorials on my site (link is in my Sig) that can give you
an idea of what to expect in terms of content. You are also more then welcome to email/msg me if you have further questions. Theres also a fair number of people around who have or are taking my courses you can ask. :)

leigh
07-15-2004, 02:25 AM
Hey Leigh, what do you think about Dan Ablan's courseware on 3dgarage.com? So far everyone I've asked has raved about it. So that could be a good sign!

Also, what do you think about Larry Shultz's courses?
I've never seen any of the 3dgarage stuff, or Larry Shultz's stuff, so I don't have an opinion on either. Actually... I have seen some 3dgarage stuff, but it was years ago. I seem to recall seeing some stuff that was on a disc accompanying 3D World magazine way back in 2001 - it was about making dirty, old textures. I'm not sure if they were done by Dan Ablan though.

chadlychoo
07-15-2004, 05:09 PM
If you decide you want to dive into animation I highly recommend LightWave 3D 7.0 Character Animation (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1556229011/ref=pd_ts_b_7/103-6881272-4210204?v=glance&s=books&n=4135) by Timothy Albee. I don't use Lightwave (got this book and Inside LW7 when I thought I was going to buy a student version of LW) but I've still learned a ton from reading it. Word of warning though, this book is not for beginners, but after you complete Inside LW or Essential LW 3D this would be the next best step for someone interested in character setup and animation.

Insider
07-15-2004, 06:06 PM
Most of these books are not setup as a course that takes the end user from one level to another in a method/logical way.

Actually, Inside LightWave [8] is exactly designed as a course. I took a lot of time reviewing other books, comments from past users, and my previous seven books to come up with this new approach. The book begins as an overview of the entire program, beginning with a simple tutorial in which you model, texture, use layers, parent, light, composite and render all in one chapter. You are then asked to close the book and work on your own. From there, the book picks up with explanations of the interfaces, key buttons and panels, then moves to 3D basics. From there, you begin in Modeler, with simple projects, then intermediate, and finally more complex. Every possible modeling method is covered such as point by point, box modeling, and splines, as well as a combination. From there, you move on into basic scene setup, lighting, and texturing. Towards the end of the book, you learn about dynamics, particles, and compositing, as well as match moving with LightWave.

The training I've done over the years has enabled me to figure out a proper learning method that has proven effective for people all over the globe, in all walks of life. There are literally hundreds of people using the 3D Garage Courseware I created, which takes this same approach to learning.

Insider
07-15-2004, 06:08 PM
Leigh wrote - I had a copy of Inside LightWave 6 when I first had to start using LightWave at work, and I found it extremely useful -

Thank you very much Leigh! Nice to see you posting!
Your book btw, is excellent.

dalecampbelljr
07-15-2004, 06:17 PM
The books are fine but all the books mentioned were confusing at first in my opinion. It is worth your money to invest in a online course. Larrys is the best for the dollar and real world work experience. http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/introtolightwave.htm is his web site. By the time you get all the books you will need (I know, I have them) you would have saved $100s by just taking Larrys course. Again just my opinion.
By the way I am selling all my books on ebay if anyone is interested cheap! :-)))
Dale

Mr_Bester
07-15-2004, 06:39 PM
I've got three books. Lightwave 5.6 Applied, Inside Lightwave 5 and Inside Lightwave 8. I just picked up IL8 Last week. I am pretty new to this stuff. I toyed with 5.6 and made a few models, scenes and anims. When I finally upgraded to 8, I started trying to actually "Learn" more. Honestly, I almost never looked at IL5, it just didn't hold my interest. 5.6 Applied helped me immensely. IL8 has been one of the best purchases I've made. It has showed me some better ways to do the modest amount of Lightwave that I do.
I can also say, the 3dGarage stuff on the disc is excellent. Also, Larry's stuff on the 3rd party disc with 8 is also excellent. If you have the cash, I don't think you can go wrong with IL8, 3dGarage, or Splinegod.
For me personally, I like getting the general knowledge first, then I think I'll go get Leigh's(texturing) and Philip's(Lighting I think) books. However, right now, I am not planning on doing 3D for a living, if you are, I think I'd go into whichever interests you most(texuring, Animating,etc)
Dug

SplineGod
07-15-2004, 08:28 PM
The books are fine but all the books mentioned were confusing at first in my opinion. It is worth your money to invest in a online course. Larrys is the best for the dollar and real world work experience. http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/introtolightwave.htm is his web site. By the time you get all the books you will need (I know, I have them) you would have saved $100s by just taking Larrys course. Again just my opinion.
By the way I am selling all my books on ebay if anyone is interested cheap! :-)))
Dale
Thanks Dale, I appreciate the comments. :)
Ive been involved with Teaching going back to the early 1980s on a variety of subjects both in and out of the USA. Ive taught graphics and 3D (in english and spanish) since the earliest versions of Lightwave (Videoscape) and other 3D apps. Its given me a huge insight in developing my courses because I have taught this in public schools, universities, seminars and my own courses. My online courses for lightwave have around longer then anyone elses. Like Dan, I have people from all walks of life and all over the world who are doing well with them. The other thing thats nice is that Ive been able to take my experiences from working at many studios and put that into not just my courses but the support as well. Youve seen from my support forum that I dont hold anything back. :)

angus1965
07-15-2004, 09:45 PM
I'm totally new to 3D so i don't have any knowledge. So my question is which books are recommended for people who are new to this?

I thought i'll get these two (because i don't want to rely on only one book):

█ Essential LightWave 7.5
█ Lightwave 3D 7.5 for Windows and Macintosh

Are these books a good choice? (they must be for LW 7.5)

thanks.
I will be honest with you and say I have not read the two books that you mentioned. However, I have had great success with the Dan Ablan book(s) - the Inside Lightwave series.

I have to agree with the folks that are suggesting the book(s) that cover a broad set of topics instead of a single area. If you start with only one area, meaning a book that concentrates on one area, you will have a very myopic view of the overall process. Chances are you will also not discover your "passion" - so do not start narrow.

Just my $.02

Solace9
07-15-2004, 10:31 PM
As a former formal student and not a person with a book published or to be published in the forseeable future, I highly recomend Dan Ablan's "Inisde Lightwave" book. The thing's huge, relative to the other available books, and so it can be a bit intimidating, but get a few hours at a time and jump in with no distractions. It is very rewarding. The content/cost ratio is one of the best there is, if not the best, and you can move at your own pace.

A friend bought "Essential Lightwave 7.5" and i browsed through it, but my honest impression is that, though it presents important information, it is disjoint whereas the project based approach of "Inside Lightwave" series teaches you progressively while integrating all the tools in to useful projects, giving one specific tool applications and an overview of workflow. Another thing is that each project usually uses some of the previous project's tools which reinforces memory by repetition of information in a slightly different context.

Now that an overview of Lightwave 3D was provided by Ablan's book, i'll be looking to more specific materials, such as Splinegod's "IK Booster" CD.

Of the other books i've seen and/or bought, I can say this as my personal oppinion based on experience:

Tips and Tricks by Ablan and Sharp:
This is a less intimidating, but simple, short and disjoint [it's just tips] book on thing's you'll likely already know from Ablan's larger book: Inside Lightwave. Still, the nice production quality of the book with full color images and glossy pages might keep a younger person's eyes glued to the information on the page a little longer than usual.

1001 Tips and Tricks by Beckwith, Warner and Wood:
I recommend this book, even for Lightwave 7.x useres. Though I have yet to read everything in this book, i've found the tips and tricks to be enlightening while having content relevant from beginner to advanced. [Very useful for using while the computer calculates someththing like a render or dynamics] The presentation is in black and white on plain paper, but the excellent content more than makes up for the lack of "flash".

Lightwave 3D Character Animation by Albee:
I used this for college class, but most everything is covered in Ablan's "Inside Lightwave" book. Still, setting the technical information aside, the dedicated subject, experience and personality of Albee make for a presentation that might be more interesting. But this is still a specialty book. People who are still finding out where their interest in 3D is, this book is too specific, but other wise it is a fine book.

So, there you have it. That's my experience and i can't wait to brows through and potentially buy: the texturing book by Leigh, the Lighting book by Boughen, the digital cinematography book by Ablan and anyothers i'm forgetting.

Hope that helps.

l&r,
Micah
S9 Design

Insider
07-15-2004, 11:55 PM
Micah -
thanks for the kind words.

I think you realize that there are multiple sources of information out there. Start wide, and find what you like - then narrow it down.... perhaps to the point of even creating your own unique book!

:bounce:

SheepFactory
07-16-2004, 12:46 AM
I can vouch for Dan Ablans training , which is top quality.

Back than when I was fiddling with lw his courses and books helped greatly and later on when I moved on to different software most of the techniques I learned from him carried over.

LWD
07-18-2004, 08:10 PM
I can vouch for Dan Ablans training , which is top quality.


Yep, have to agree.

His books rock too.
Just today I had a puzzling question about something I hadn't done in Lightwave for a while. I guessed that if I just checked Dan's book (Inside 7 in this case) in the index I would find the answer. I did. He anticipates. );-D

zzgus
07-18-2004, 11:38 PM
I started with LEWIS tutorial.

http://www.lwg3d.org/forums/showthread.php?t=14554

Gus

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