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uxus
06-28-2002, 05:47 PM
Hello! I'm planing to leave Israel and go study in Canada. I have a place to live in Toronto. Mostly i want to learn character animation and art generally to have some art knowlege, but i dont know what school to choose. I've searched the web but there, they give you a small information and nothing about the money. Please recomend me a school in toronto or near, and if you can an URL will be helpfull.
I would like to know your opinion about those schools, and i would like to know how much generally does it cost per year.
Please help me! My future is in your hands. Thanks!!! :wavey:

richardrosenman
06-28-2002, 07:26 PM
Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario which is about 40 minutes from Toronto is known as the world's best animation school. They offer excellent courses in traditional and computer animation.

-Richard

uxus
06-28-2002, 10:18 PM
as i understood from their site the compute animation is a post graduate programm, what exactly they trying to say??? :hmm:
from where i need to graduate?

sigma
06-28-2002, 10:55 PM
Its not easy getting accepted to Sheridan. I suggest looking at smaller schools like The International Academy of Design in Toronto or something equivilant and maybe take some traditional art studies on the side. Really depends on your skill level. Sheridan is probably still the best in Canada but you need the following;

Three-year postsecondary diploma or
degree in the visual or fine arts, or
Demonstrated competence through relevant work experience.


Those are the requirments for the Computer Animation ( Post Graduate ) Course as stated on their web site. http://www.sheridanc.on.ca/programs02_03/saad/companimation/require.html

uxus
06-29-2002, 12:11 AM
Yes i know about that school, but i wanted to ask: what a "certificate" gives you if you don't have a degree?

richardrosenman
06-29-2002, 12:44 AM
Sheridan's computer animation program IS post graduate, which means you have to first graduate from a design course to take it. (They may also allow you entry if you have been working in the field for several years). Many students, for example, choose to take the Art fundamentals course the first year and, I believe that if you graduate that with a B average minimum, then you are guarranteed entry to the animation program. (I just don't remember if that entry is for the classical or computer animation program).

I myself took Sheridan's Classical Animation program for 3 years and then I had the option of taking the computer animation program afterwards, which I skipped since I was already working in the industry. Entry into the classical animation program is as difficult as the computer animation program. In my year they accepted 120 students from over 1000 for 1st year, then cut that down to about 60 for second year, and finally for 3rd year, there were about 30 of us who graduated.

As for your question regarding the certificate: During the animation boom that occurred 5 years ago, many animators went South to work and, as a result, the American government began to crack down on the animation brain-drain coming into the US. Therefore, it is more difficult now to get a working visa in the US and having some sort of degree or certificate or diploma will substantially improve your chances of getting one. Even if you do get one, remember that it becomes void the seond you stop working for the company that emplyed you in the states.

There are other options for schools as well in CANADA. There is the Vancouver Film school, Seneca College, Centennial College, and more. Just be careful and do your research when you choose one.

If I was going to school again, I would choose Sheridan again without a doubt.

Hope this helps;

-Richard

tsmalldon
06-29-2002, 12:45 AM
The Academy offers you a diploma in computer animation in post production

not a certificate
its certaintly not the best place to go
but it is decent
u learn what u need to know
then its up to you to apply it
like with all art

ggg
06-29-2002, 01:36 AM
Sheridans rep as the top 2D and computer animation school fell quite a few years ago but is returning recently and has always produced great reels. Seneca and Centenial both have very good equipment with varied quality in reels.
The International Academy of Design has really horrible work in their TV ads and that is all I know about them as well as the remarks of a few that I know that attended some of their non-animation classes, I have not seen any of their reels.
If there is any way for you to go and see these schools first hand, without a guide glamourizing the equipment or showing only the best in a demo reel, go and look at the screens of students at work and compare quality, I think you will make a very quick and easy decision.

HapZungLam
06-29-2002, 02:03 AM
In Sheriden(which my friend is going in the following semester), you can take the 3 years tranditional animation course first. it is much easier to get int 3D.

However, tranditional animation and sheriden is still very hard to get it. Well, this is what my friend do. he will take 1 year foundation. after 1 year. re apply tranditional. then you can get in. after 3 years. apply 3D animation.

it is quite a long run isn't it. like going for doctor.

alphatron
06-29-2002, 08:13 AM
The International Academy of Design in Toronto= a REAL big nono. I've only heard bad things about their computer graphics and animation programs from friends who went there.


I took some parttime courses at The Centre for Creative Communication at Centennial, and I really love the place. You can take parttime or full. Parrtime will give you acertificate full a diploma.

Also, I've heard that Seneca's digital animation program is also quite good. Good facilities.

Here are links to the two schools:

http://www.thecentre.centennialcollege.ca

http://dmc.senecac.on.ca

sigma
06-29-2002, 08:53 AM
The International Academy of Design in Toronto= a REAL big nono. I've only heard bad things about their computer graphics and animation programs from friends who went there.

It started to go down hill in 2001 when they booted all the good teachers. That was a big mistake. You know its bad when they havent changed their commericial in over 3 years.

ggg
06-29-2002, 09:19 AM
OK, I have to be harsh as some of my relatives went there and it sounded horrid. Sorry I know its someones work but The Academys reel on TV is like a pan and scan across a bombardment of poorly colored and executed adobe howto tutorials, horrible irresponsible use of painter and graphics so awful that would be difficult to make them in a 'how bad can you make it look' contest.

uxus
06-29-2002, 09:53 AM
Ok. I understand about "the academy of design" but wat about other schools?
I will be contacting some schools in a few days, and will try to choose. But don't let me interupt you, keep it coming.

bentllama
06-29-2002, 09:57 AM
As a graduate of both the classical and computer animation programs at Sheridan I feel I have a few things to add to this thread.

Sheridan is a good school that has a great reputation for turning out some top quality animators and artists. The main reason for this success is the fact that they only select the best cantidates and keep a very Darwinistic approach to the curriculum...you either get better or you get asked to leave.

With this fact in mind, that Sheridan only accepts the best and has a large attrition rate, you as a student at Sheridan are surrounded by the best peers you can have. Teacher's methods can only go so far and after that, it is your peers that drive you. It is the same in a production environment...you are only as good as your teammates' work. The comradery and unspoken contest to be the best was one of the greatest set of principles I took away from my experience at Sheridan.

True, that when you look at other schools make sure to view the quality of work that comes out of the programs...but you must also take into account the spectrum of alumni of that school in the industry. If that school has a wide range of alumni in professional careers, then they have to be doing something right.

It really comes down to where you really want to go, this is your future...so do some research, ask around [like you did here] and formulate your own opinions where to go...

... just beware of the "revolving door" schools that are in the business because the allure of working in 3D is growing increasingly popular...they create a horrible stigma in the industry by soaking people with false hopes and bad demo reels just to make a buck...

...to be honest, when reviewing reels from alumni of these "cookie-cutter" schools I tend to cringe and not give the reel a second thought...because the majority are indeed atrocious... but there are the odd few students that have the talent to shine past the rest of the garbage, but they seem few and far between...

...just remember that a good artist will stand out above the rest...

...good luck!... :)

Wigaru Wiyamoto
06-29-2002, 10:18 AM
Sheridan sounds interesting. Is the program intended for people who already have animation experience? I'm getting a BS in Media Arts and Animation (2d and 3d animation), would going to Sheridan's graduate program just be redundant? I'm just curious, since I'm in student loan hell as it is. :)

thhchx
06-23-2003, 07:28 AM
error...

seer
06-23-2003, 07:54 AM
I think you should check out those few schools thoroughly before going to any of them. It's an investment as well.. you don't wanna put your money down, go in, experience a major let down then what?

Sheridan may be famous but is it a suitable place? Just because it's famous doesn't guarantee anything. I do have quite a number of friends from within (both classical and computer animation) and they've told me things which I will only say it's on 'the other end of the spectrum'. It's understandable anyway, top places also possess lots of big headed people, competition, people with insecurities... and they are your peers(that include younger instructors).. you go figure. If you like such places, then go for it... else, don't waste your time and money.

I do agree with some one else here using some "Darwinistic' theory. Yeap... they usually take those who are already good and doesn't need much teaching. Then there's the question, so what are the instructors doing? Hmmm...good question... that's for you to figure too. Naturally their demo reels (for computer animation)are good because they already know what to do.

I know too much?? I'm too pragmatic. Is it all nonsense?

Times are changing, other places are getting better. Don't just look at the brand...

I've been down the road going to so-called good schools but experienced major let-downs. I've also been to so-so places but the people are so much more sincere and genuine which inspired me a lot more.. and my work is better too...

It's subjective? No doubt. You go figure.

Vandal
06-23-2003, 06:46 PM
I did some mega research before picking the school I'm at right now. I live about 4 hours north of Toronto in North Bay and I decided to pursue 3D animation.

My choices were - Sheridan - take their classical animation program for three years and then take their 2 year post-graduate computer animtion program (which used to be one year).

Seneca - take a program called Digital Media Arts. I don't know if you're thinking the same as me.. but I asked myself, "What the hell does that mean??!?!" Did some research, it's more of an all around program. A little bit of modeling, a little bit of animation.. some 2D.. some 3D.. some video editing.. just all around media art stuff. I have two friends currently taking this course.

Algonquin - I didn't hear great things from this program.

Humber - Same deal, didn't really hear much. Though now they are being featured on Alias Wavefront's site here and there, so they can't be doing all that bad.

Lastly, my school of choice (which is NEVER talked about) - St. Clair College - they have a brand new program called Tradigital Animation. It's a 3 year program combining both classical animation and computer animation together in one. The first year focuses on 2D animation and the basic concepts needed to become an "animator".. dun dun DUN. 2nd year is split right down the middle, both 2D and 3D.. but most students (like myself) focused on the 3D work. I will be returning for my 3rd year coming September. By this time, there isn't anymore teaching, squash and stretch, timing, perspective.. we all know it, and use it everyday. It's time to show off our mad skills. We will be doing one major 2D project along with a few 3D peices. When I mean peices, I mean 2-3 month work period.

We have 3D animation lab of about 40 dual Xeon 2gig machines, a 2D animation lab where every student has their own animation desk with a light table with space to put their work. It's a great atmosphere with DVD players, projectors, sound systems..and the best part is that it's open 24/7 - all day, everyday. Even weekends.

We just had our first set of graduates this year, and I know my class is going to blow their work out of the water. We have some amazing stuff and you'll see.. we'll have our name in the industry soon enough.

When I first entered this program, I figured it was just a step in the door and I would have to go to Sheridan and take their Computer Animation program.. but I was wrong. I've got a leg in the door, and I'm break it down.

Our site hasn't been updated since last year, but it should have new stuff this summer.
http://www.stclairc.on.ca/programs/departments/animation/

AndreKling
07-01-2003, 11:33 PM
Hello, i was researching about Sheridan and notice that they have a Bachelor program in animation. Any one knows anything about it? In the web site they say it costs around 8000 a year, is this price only for canadians people or also for international students?
Could anyone post the price ( per year ) of their course, and if it is the same price for international students?

Andre Kling David

Day-Dreamer
07-02-2003, 05:56 AM
Originally posted by AndreKling
Hello, i was researching about Sheridan and notice that they have a Bachelor program in animation. Any one knows anything about it? In the web site they say it costs around 8000 a year, is this price only for canadians people or also for international students?
Could anyone post the price ( per year ) of their course, and if it is the same price for international students?

Andre Kling David

sorry about my english

Program - Applied art of animation

Length -4 Years

First and second year>>>core program
Third year>>>classical or digital
Fouth year>>>If digital >>>Character animation or visual effect

Tution fees >>> 19000 CDN Dollar per year (Accoring to their e mail reply)for international student.Don't know about canadian student.

Only start in spetember

I am interational student who live in toronto.I will apply for the sheridan four years applied art of animation in next year (2004 September).Now i am taking the first years classical animation course in downtown toronto(Max the mutt).I am also looking for sheridan student who is taking 4 years animation degree . I want to know what kind of admission policy for prosepctive student.Someone who is sheridan student ?Pls reply me!Thanz.

plouffe
08-10-2003, 03:17 AM
First off im only going to speak of sheridan since i am a student in their classical animation program. I cant really give any info on the Other animation schools. I knew right out of highschool i wanted to go to sheridan Not Only for its reputation but for the work that i have seen coming out of there compared to other schools. IM not saying is IS the best school But rather im saying it IS a GREAT school. And these days i see ALot of good work comming out of VFS for 3d stuff anmd what not.

Hmm I was kinda bothered by what i read from Seer. seems like hes putting down the sheridan programs Like they dont teach anythign and that they only accept good students that know everything and that going to sheridan is only an opportunity to work on a reel that you could do at home and that your only going to sheridan so that you can put "Sheridan" on your resume!. In a way It is true that Sheridan does have a reputation and putting it on your resume is a good thing to have. But really you have no idea how much you learn No matter How famous a school is.. Theres a reason why they are famous and you just have to experience the school for you self to know what i mean. im sure not everyone goes through the same experience and quite honestly Im sure you can probably get the same level of education at any other school. to tell you the truth it really doesnt matter What school you go to its what you get out of the school.

As a second year classical animation i KNOw exactly the talent that is in the classical animation program. and i can guarantee you that the artistic level of everyone varies QUITE alot. And its not necessairely true that they only accept AWESOME STUDENTS who know what they are doing because well im one of those people who didnt really know what he was doing when i got into the program. Prior to the animation program i did 1 year of art fundamentals and since i got a B+ average i got the chance to apply for the classical animation program and get accepted through direct entry rather then submit a portfolio. Now i did have to send a portfolio But direct entry gives you a better chance in getting in because out of all the art fundamental students maybe 70 get accepted for direct entry and only 25 get accepted for the animation program. AND NO YOU CANT GO FROM ART FUNDAMENTAL TO COMPUTER ANIMATION unless of course you have working experience in the animation field =p.

Now let me explain what Art Fundamentals is about. Art fundies is a 1 year foundation program that anyone can get into. you dont have to be good at drawing or anything. theres no portfolio nothing. Its pretty mmuch 1 year to teach you art basics in Design , life drawing , painting , sculpting ect. Again the level of talent is quite diverse. YOu have people who are really good to people who dont know what the hell they are doing!!! Its a good program to take if you dont know WHAt you want to do. and also a good 1 year program for if you want to get into animation, illustration or design or arts and craft!. That year gives you the opportunity to work on a portfolio to get into the program you want. And it did EXACTLY that for me. As a fundies student i was 17 years old and i wanted to do illustration. By the end of the year after seeing all the work in the animation wing I really wanted to be an animator =p soo im quite glad i did take the 1 year of foundation stuff. Soo for a Whole year i worked on a Life drawing portfolio and i can guarantee you the reason why i got into the animation program was because of my life drawing capabilities. They werent all that GREAT but i guess they stood appart from the other students because i was doing at least 4 hours of life drawing a day everyday.


Now that i got the foundation year out of the way. Your in the animation program =p. Now again you will quickly realize that not everyone is not up to the same skill lvl. And not to mention you have people that are directly out of highschool to people that are 40 years old!!!. some people are professionals others are just starting out. I think my first year we were 100 students or so. IN a way you are amongst the BEST But only the best of who applied!!!. In general EVERYONE in first year animation has a good knowledge of the basics and well Thats why you made it into the program and yes there is the occasional "ART GOD" but those are really rare. The teachers dont expect you to know EVERYTHING you are there to learn. THe first month we review Art basics such as design principals and perspective and what not. Most of the people in first year have NEVER done any animation soo thats a WHOLE new thing you have to learn. Now to come back to the comments that SEER was saying that the teachers dont teach. Well THey teach you the basics which is ALL they can teach.. they cant Tell you how draw in a specific style .. They cant give you tutorials on how to draw bones they cant tell you what colours to pick Ect.. ITS ART!!!!!!! you have to be able to make youre own choices.. For example in my character design teacher CANT teach you how to design characters. He can tell you that things look wrong Like anatomy , perspective design principles and what not AGAIN THESE ARE BASICS WHICH THEY DO TEACH YOU and reinforce THAT WELL YOU SHOULD KNOW BEFORE COMING INTO THE PROGRAM. AND IF YOU DONT KNOW THEM THATS WHY YOU DIDNT MAKE IT INTO ANIMATION ADN THATS WHY YOU SHOULD BE IN A FOUNDATION PROGRAM!!!!!! ANd its a GREAT WAY to learn. do it your self and teachers critique it by giving you advice and stearing you into the Right direction so that you can develop you own style and flare.. And as my character design teacher would say and i quote from an email he sent me

"Ireally wanted to let you know that I had a great time teaching this year...not that I did much teaching. I like to think of the job as facilitating ideas, and letting the learning curve develope on its own."

Now things like design and style cant really be taught. You can be told how others do it but not be taught how to do it yourself! its a matter of trial and error and what you think looks good. And the teachers are sheridan really help you to develop you own style by letting you take over.

As for classes like Storyboarding and layout and animation AGAIN they teach you the basics show you examples how other students and professionals do it and You take it from there! Take what you learnt apply it your self and they teacher will guide you along the way. you have to understand that Part of learning is doing the work yourself and exploring not only listening to a teacher that tells you how to do it.

And PLEASE if you ever do fine a school that a teacher would tell you exactly how to do it and they ahve tutorials for everything The graduates of that school would have a bunch of reels that look exactly the same done in the same techniques . And one thing that makes Drawing or 3d or ART soo great is the diversity in designs , movements colours and Styles!!!


It's understandable anyway, top places also possess lots of big headed people, competition, people with insecurities... and they are your peers(that include younger instructors).. you go figure. If you like such places, then go for it... else, don't waste your time and money.

Thats a pretty general Statement. Heh Anywhere you go IN the industry , any school , ANYWHERE you will HAVE people like this. Its human nature to be competitive. ANd yes some people are Hot heads But really DEAL with it man.. theres ALWAYS someone BETTER then you and you just have to deal with that.. ANd going into an enviroment like that really develops your social skills. ALSO well in an industry like animation jobs are hard to come by soo being competitive and getting the BEST WORK YOu can do so that you can blow people away with your skills will get you the JOB YOu want. Now being cocky is a different story everyone hates those people and if you ask me companies dont like cocky people who work on their own and thinks their better then everyone else soo you shouldnt have anything to worrry about !!!! I would REALLY love to find a place or a school where everyone gets along and where theres no compitition and where EVERYONE gets a job out of school.. WOW THAT WOULD BE great but really get real! Its a hard world out there and everyone needs to shead bloood and tears to get where they want to get even if that means raising your competition notch a little =p.... By the time you graduate Not only are you competing against your school mates and other animation students who graduated but your also in big pond with hundreds of industry professionals that are out of work!!!!!

I do agree with some one else here using some "Darwinistic' theory. Yeap... they usually take those who are already good and doesn't need much teaching. Then there's the question, so what are the instructors doing? Hmmm...good question... that's for you to figure too. Naturally their demo reels (for computer animation)are good because they already know what to do.

I answered this in my post And well Again EVERYONE NEEDS guidance no matter how good they are.. You learn the basics then you get guided throught the years. Its all fun and games. And i can assure you that most people need guidance and their real skills dont show until a teacher helps them develop whatever they need. !!!!! And the reason WHy computer animation at sheridan has a good reputations is that Yes they do take students who already know what they are doing and theres a GOOOOD reason for that!!! of course some people slip throught the crack somehow and dont know what they are doing. BUt the reason why they take people with degrees in animation is because well computer animation is like an Upgrade to everything you went to school for. Its More of a NEw medium to learn. Its something that well you should KNOW art basics and animation basics before getting into and it just soo happens that most people who get into computer animation have over 4 year of life drawing , over 3 years of animation experience and probably over 5 years old Design experience. If computer animation was really meant for highschool students with no experience in anything the reels would honestly suck and thats why ALOT of schools out there suck. And if you ask me If Sheridan Kicks you out because your not good enough Well Im all For it because that could really save you some trouble later in life and REally dont get discouraged because its a BIG kick in the face telling you " HEY BUDDY GO LEARN SOME BASICS" Adn really some people might reeally Want to do that stuff for a living BUt its not FOR EVERYONE and i think that some people just DONT HAVE IT!!!! its sad but true.



Now in the end one thing i do agree with Seer is that Well look at everyschools and pick whats best for you. dont just go for the brand. But of course Again the school you pick REALLY doesnt matter you will notice you learn ALOT more from your peers then you do from your teachers and thats whats really important is the enviroment. You can get just as much out of a cheap community college that no one has heard of that you can from a big name school. Of course sometimes Brands do matter because well they really ARE the best. And being surrounded by the best and having alot of competition is really an experience that i would suggest everyone should go through Because You would be suprise how much harder you do try when you know joe schmoe is damn good and you want to show other people that oyu can do the exact same thing =p. Dont pass up on a good opportunity in learning.


WOw biggest post ive have EVER written and i hope it makes sense. im just too lazy to go through it for spelling mistakes soo please forgive me and i hope you do read everything.

Day-Dreamer
08-10-2003, 06:32 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by plouffe

QUOTE]

-------------------------------------------------------------
hi:wip: plouffe
If you don't mind i want to ask you about your experience of sheridan.I am thinking to apply new applied art of animation for next year .I am international student and currently taking classical animation in max the mutt animation school.I am interested in visual effect and I heard that in fourth year student can choose either character animation or visual effect as a major.That why i am thinking to apply.First of all,Do you know what kind of portfolio do i need to provide.I mean focus on life drawing or just drawing?Do you recommend me to choose sheridan or other school?There are many things i want to know about sheridan :shrug: >if yoou have spare time ,pls reply me.
Thanks

plouffe
08-10-2003, 06:55 AM
Day- Dreamer

Well What exactly do you want to do after school ?

Anyways Im not in the bacherlor degree program at sheridan. I didnt get the opportunity to take it Unless i decided to drop out and start all over again =p. But the thing about the degree program Is that not only do you leanr 2d animation but Also you get 3d animation classes amnd it looks like in your third and fourth year you can get classes on digital effects and or character animation.

im sorry i cant really answer any other questions about the bachelor program because i really dont know anything about it.

http://www.sheridanc.on.ca/applied_degrees/animation.html

heres a link with info on the program .

POrtfolio wise. WHen you apply for next year they will send a list of EXACTLY what they want in the portfolio. Usually they ask for various life drawings. And also the portfolio is part test soo they ask you to draw specific things like a Storyboard scenerio they give you , they might ask you to draw your room from 2 different angles, they will also give you a character and a story and ask you to draw a few panels with that character , some normal every day objects. And they might even ask you to write a little story!. Ohhh and they ask for extra work too. BUT they do NOT WANT TO SEE CHARACTER DESIGNs , FANTASY work , anime , ect.. ect.. they dont care if you can draw a cartoon or not.. What really matters are your basic art skills and if you can show them that you can life draw and story tell then those are 2 of the most important skills that would get you in!

I would just recommend that you work on life drawing , observational drawing , perspective stuff and storytelling. They dont care if you can paint chicks with big tits , or AWESOME guns OR even if you can Anime MEGATRON... Just master the basics and you should get in!!

plouffe
08-10-2003, 07:04 AM
Oh and as far as recommending schools . Well I dont know i cant recommend any rreally i guess it depends what you want to do. Sheridan is a good school in my opinion BUt maybe its not for everyone!. If your interested in computer animation Theres alot of schools out there for that kind of stuff including Sheridan college But i honestly i havent seen alot of work from the cg department at sheridan they pretty much keep to them selves and everything is soo top secret haha. BUt if you want 2d animation Sheridan would be your school in canada anyways. But i havent heard anythign good from 2d animation schools in the states my second pick would probably be that School in Ireland for 2d animation Balleyfermot.

IN ontario theres a few 2d animation art schools Sheridan college , Algonquin college , St -Clair College. Out of the 3 i would definetly pick Sheridan. I visited the other 2 schools and PERSONALLY in MY OPINION i didnt like the work coming out of the other schools. We have ALOT of students from both of those schools transferring to sheridan after doing ayear or 2 in those schools. Not that im trying to put down St-Clair or Algonquin im sure they have some good students but in my opinion what ive seen when i visitied is that the skill level is soo much higher at Sheridan Judgin from the reels and the student work!

Day-Dreamer
08-10-2003, 07:15 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by plouffe


My dream is to become a visual effect artist.I want to work in visual effect field(tracking ,matching 3d into live
action,composition........).:eek:
By the way ,you live in your own house or rent a apartment.I want to know some local info of oakville.compare to toronto, living expense is cheaper or more expensive?I am concerned about money coz i am international student.Do you know that school fees for international studnt is very expensive(applied art of animation =19000 cdn dollar per year):scream:

Thanks for you input. :love:

plouffe
08-10-2003, 07:47 AM
Ahh yeah every young boys dream is to work visual fx.( not me though hehe) If thats what you want to do . i REALLY cant recomment classical animation for you. unless you LOVE to draw classical animation is well pretty much an intensive drawing program!!!! and i Really do stress the intensive part.. Although in this new bachelor program you might get the opportunity to do some very simple visual effects i serisously doutb its what you imagine. Im afraid that their probably wouldnt be any Tracking , OR ANY LIVE ACTION MATCHING or any of that stuff!!!!) By the time yougraduate fromt he classical animation program you probably will have ALOT of knowledge on design , storyboarding , drawing LIFE DRAWING.. and som basic unstanding of 3d animation as well as some SIMPLE SIMPLE cg effects( nothing to do with live action) Soo yeah if you want to learn how to do effects like in the MAtrix , or in Xmen or any of that stuff.. i think that the classical animation bachelor progmram is FAR from what you want... IF you REALLY wanmt visually effects type stuff i would probably recommend going into a computer animation program that deals with EXACTLY what you want.. Visual effect or 3d stuff.. like Vancouver film school or even if you can get into the sheridan computer aniamtion program. I just dont want you to be disapointed But if you want to do visual effects classical animation isnt the RIGHT place to be BUT it might help you get where ever you want to get. THough thats ALOT of work and you really would have to be dedicated at doinmg classical animation and drawing and life drawing because im afraid it would be VERY long 3 years before you even touch SLIGHTLY what you would want digital effects and even when you will be taking that class it would only be 1 class probably teaching u how to use particles or whatever!!!!

As for tuition Fee Yeah it should be around 19000$ canadian for foreign students! Im canadian soo its only about 6500$ a year .. You would also have to add books , supplies , food , appartment and all that stuff soo for you it probably would end up being well over 24 000$ a year. I would also recommend if you go to school at sheridan is that you guy an appartment or house near the school. like withimn 5 mimute walk. I have 3 bedroom apartment with 2 other friends about 10 min walk from school. travelling from toroto to oakville and all that can get quite annoying and that means you cant work late nights unless you sleep over at someones house or unless you have your own car. and well with gas money or bus money that can be quite expensive. Soo thats why an apartment that is walking distance to the school is GREAT!. Oakvilles bus system sucks.. no buses on sundays and at night the buses take soo long!!!

Hope i didnt discourage you or crush your visual effects dreams.

/plouffe

Day-Dreamer
08-10-2003, 11:08 PM
Originally posted by plouffe




Drawing won't bother me :) .I just finished my summer drawing course annd love it.life drawing ,perspective and principle of drawing. i like the perspective drawing the most.What I believe is 3d is just the another tools for artist.After i learned the traditional stuff ,i can choose 2d ,3d or whatever i like.i heard a lot of pixar guys are 2d artist before they jump to the 3d.i also found out that alot of big company request strong traditional skill.
like ilm>>>http://www.ilm.com/cgi-bin/getjob.pl?76-02
I don't want to learn just a software so don't worry.i need to build a storng communication too.
thanks for your suggestions.:thumbsup:

Garduna_Knight
08-27-2003, 05:59 PM
For those of you that are going to be in Art Fundies this coming September, there will NOT BE Direct Entry for us. I don't know the reasons in why they would do such a thing but that is what I got from yesterdays Orientation.

Greenlief
08-27-2003, 06:42 PM
<bias> It's all about U of T! </bias> ;)

Sheridan seems to be the one for animation in this city. First place that pops into anybody's mind. Not to mention they produce some fine people!

Best of luck on your decision!

Garduna_Knight
08-28-2003, 12:07 AM
thanks

CG_opener
08-30-2003, 09:19 PM
Is anyone know about the Digital Visual Effects program that Sheridan offer?

It's Post-diploma 1 Year program.

TERM 1
CANM4023 Effects Animation 1
CANM4021 Visual Effects Compositing 1
CANM4014 Computer Lighting & Rendering 1
CANM4020 Adv. Computer Animation Technology 1
CANM4022 Visual FX and Pre-Production

TERM 2
CANM4016 Effects Animation 2
CANM4018 Visual Effects Compositing 2
CANM4019 Computer Lighting & Rendering 1
CANM4015 Adv. Computer Animation Technology 2
CANM4017 Visual FX Directed Projects

I want to learn Visual Effects & Compositing.

Is this program better program than Vancouver Film School offer?

THX for any info. :wavey:

rushi
08-30-2003, 10:08 PM
Ya sheridan is best

Wigaru Wiyamoto

Sepetember addmition is full in sheridan.

3datri

sangramdange
10-05-2003, 08:48 PM
hi guys i have finished my architecture and i wish to further my education in field of computer animation which i always wanted to do .
what are my chances in gettin into sheridan . architects are good designers ,we deal with lot of drawing & perspective practice , and i myself do lot of cartytooning , i have also completed a basic one year course in traditional animattion.
architecture is combination of art and technology. since sheridans program eligibility is a degree in visual and fine art. iam not sure that am i eligible to apply for computer animation program.
bcoz what i feel is industrial designers , architects are very related to visual art.
please do guide me regarding my query .

???
10-05-2003, 09:02 PM
Ok i have a question... what 3D app use sheridan for there students ?

Garduna_Knight
10-05-2003, 09:04 PM
sangramdange, in getting into the compter animation course at sheridan, there are a few choices for you.

1) 4-5 year (i'm not sure) computer animation degree course
2) 1 year computer animation effects course, postdeploma/degree
3) 1 year computer animation character course, post DD


in getting into the frst option, you'll need to have a 80% average and will need to submit a good portfolio.

the second and third option is almost the same.

peachstapler
10-06-2003, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by ???
Ok i have a question... what 3D app use sheridan for there students ?

from the Maya Artist Salary thread in General Discussions:

Originally posted by ???
Software = Just a tool bro. :shrug:

Day-Dreamer
10-09-2003, 12:58 AM
Originally posted by peachstapler
from the Maya Artist Salary thread in General Discussions:


True .software is just a tool .but for you question ,i heard they use hondini for TD and Maya fro other program.Alias is a partner of sheridan.

Jason Park
02-24-2004, 01:56 PM
Hi, I know this thread is quite old, but I just want to ask something. I am planning to attend Sheridan's animation program. I'm currenly in grade 11, graduating next year (September).

I am going start working on my portfolio soon. Do you have any recommendations on what kind of things I should include in my portfolio?

I know there are like 7 basic things that I need to include, but what kind of additional drawings should I include?

Thanks, :thumbsup:

bentllama
02-24-2004, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by Jason Park
Hi, I know this thread is quite old, but I just want to ask something. I am planning to attend Sheridan's animation program. I'm currenly in grade 11, graduating next year (September).

I am going start working on my portfolio soon. Do you have any recommendations on what kind of things I should include in my portfolio?

I know there are like 7 basic things that I need to include, but what kind of additional drawings should I include?

Thanks, :thumbsup:

SHOW WHAT YOU KNOW

Every piece of work that you submit is a dirst reflection of what you know...or what you are leading the portfolio reviewers to believe what you know...so...

Show only your best work.

Remember that they also want to see how you think. How you apply your skills to the medium.

Be serious about your work and it will be seriously viewed. Put your best foot forward, respect your work and take it seriously.

On the note of taking your work seriously...
Be wary of showing immature or blatant fanboy material, tattoo art, offensive material or poorly done spaceships or crazed ninja robots.

Life study will get you everywhere. Figure drawing and environment sketching...show you know the figure and how it works...

Garduna_Knight
02-24-2004, 05:14 PM
Hey there, i'm currently a Art Fundamentals student as Sheridan and here are some tips for the Illustration and Animation programs:

1) life drawing, i'm talking about the ones that have naked models. 1 minutes gestures and 20 minute full drawings rack up points. important note is that you need to show structure inide those life drawings (ex. geometric stucture and the curves of how the model is posing)

2) like what bentllama said, environmental studies are a good way to show that you are not just a ci anime of fantasy freak. show drawings of ur house, ur school and even the park is a good idea. also, structore is improtatnt. the PERSPECTIVE is key here. they don't want to see something that is too big for its own good or anything that is made up and is out of place.

3) if you have amazing tonal rendering for marker or pencil crayon, those would be a good addition to ur portfolio.

4) also, be diverse, don't just show pure life drawing or pure perspective, have a range of mediums that u use and a variety of works.

hope this covers ur question ^_^

wish me luck, i'm trying to get into Medai Arts or Illustration as well hehe

Garduna_Knight
02-24-2004, 05:15 PM
Originally posted by bentllama
SHOW WHAT YOU KNOW

Every piece of work that you submit is a dirst reflection of what you know...or what you are leading the portfolio reviewers to believe what you know...so...

Show only your best work.

Remember that they also want to see how you think. How you apply your skills to the medium.

Be serious about your work and it will be seriously viewed. Put your best foot forward, respect your work and take it seriously.

On the note of taking your work seriously...
Be wary of showing immature or blatant fanboy material, tattoo art, offensive material or poorly done spaceships or crazed ninja robots.

Life study will get you everywhere. Figure drawing and environment sketching...show you know the figure and how it works...

Hey there, i'm currently a Art Fundamentals student as Sheridan and here are some tips for the Illustration and Animation programs:

1) life drawing, i'm talking about the ones that have naked models. 1 minutes gestures and 20 minute full drawings rack up points. important note is that you need to show structure inide those life drawings (ex. geometric stucture and the curves of how the model is posing)

2) like what bentllama said, environmental studies are a good way to show that you are not just a ci anime of fantasy freak. show drawings of ur house, ur school and even the park is a good idea. also, structore is improtatnt. the PERSPECTIVE is key here. they don't want to see something that is too big for its own good or anything that is made up and is out of place.

3) if you have amazing tonal rendering for marker or pencil crayon, those would be a good addition to ur portfolio.

Jason Park
02-24-2004, 06:57 PM
Originally posted by Garduna_Knight
Hey there, i'm currently a Art Fundamentals student as Sheridan and here are some tips for the Illustration and Animation programs:

1) life drawing, i'm talking about the ones that have naked models. 1 minutes gestures and 20 minute full drawings rack up points. important note is that you need to show structure inide those life drawings (ex. geometric stucture and the curves of how the model is posing)

2) like what bentllama said, environmental studies are a good way to show that you are not just a ci anime of fantasy freak. show drawings of ur house, ur school and even the park is a good idea. also, structore is improtatnt. the PERSPECTIVE is key here. they don't want to see something that is too big for its own good or anything that is made up and is out of place.

3) if you have amazing tonal rendering for marker or pencil crayon, those would be a good addition to ur portfolio.

4) also, be diverse, don't just show pure life drawing or pure perspective, have a range of mediums that u use and a variety of works.

hope this covers ur question ^_^

wish me luck, i'm trying to get into Medai Arts or Illustration as well hehe

Thanks for the tips bentllama and Garduna_Knight! Those will be really helpful when I am making the porfolio.

Oh yeah, one thing I forgot to ask. :) To get into Illustration program, does the portfolio I am sending has to be different from the one I send to animation department? Basically, what I want to ask is: "do they have different expectations and requirements?"

Thanks!

P.S. Also, good luck Garduna_Knight! :thumbsup:

rushi
02-25-2004, 02:03 AM
Yaps Sheridan is the best, but hard to get in to it.

So which are the other good animation school in canada?

3datri

Garduna_Knight
02-25-2004, 04:36 AM
Originally posted by Jason Park
Thanks for the tips bentllama and Garduna_Knight! Those will be really helpful when I am making the porfolio.

Oh yeah, one thing I forgot to ask. :) To get into Illustration program, does the portfolio I am sending has to be different from the one I send to animation department? Basically, what I want to ask is: "do they have different expectations and requirements?"

Thanks!

P.S. Also, good luck Garduna_Knight! :thumbsup:

thats for the thumbs up :D

and yes, animination is harder then illustration and both require different works EXCEPT for the "optional work"

and another note is that animation is harder to get into then illustration . animation is more on perspective and life drawing while illustration wants to see more of a diverse use of mediums



as for other schools:

george brown - graphic design
seneca - graphic design, animation, post grad 3d animation
centeinnel - animation

those are the ones i would recommend excluding sheridan

Jason Park
02-25-2004, 12:12 PM
Ah I see. Thanks for the answer! :wavey:

Day-Dreamer
03-02-2004, 10:15 PM
hi I'm trying to get some info from current and former students of centennial college.I am thinking to go for one year digital animaion course.my question is pretty much same as what DAbuel was asking so here it is.:beer:


1.How many students would you say are in each class?

2.What is the Ratio of Students getting a Job and how is there placement Dept.?

3.Is this another school that will take trustfund babies that really have no interest or passion for the arts?

4.How are the Teachers, are they knowlegable and what kind of experiance do you know they have?

5.Do they offer a internship as a require course? if not do you think there is enough time to intern in the middle of the course?

6.if you had the chance to turn back time would you go back to centennial college or take a 4 year College BA Degree (if you had the money)?

Jason Park
03-03-2004, 12:07 PM
Just out of curiousity, isn't Centennial College the school in British Columbia? :) I heard that Centennial College is one of the best schools for animation after Sheridan, but that's just what I heard. :thumbsup:

Garduna_Knight
03-03-2004, 02:11 PM
Centennial College is situated in toronto actually

kemijo
03-03-2004, 02:17 PM
Centennial College is in Toronto. Their facility is called the BCCC, or Bell Center for Creative Communications. I don't know that much about Vancouver, but I believe their best known schools for Digital Content are Vanvouver Film School and VanArts.

Jason Park
03-03-2004, 04:16 PM
Oh, really? I guess I heard the name wrong. Sorry for my dumbness! :p

Garduna_Knight
03-03-2004, 05:25 PM
Originally posted by Jason Park
Oh, really? I guess I heard the name wrong. Sorry for my dumbness! :p

lol np, if you want to learn more, just go to their website for info ^_^

sorry i can't help ya more, i'm from sheridan and the only other place that i kinda know is seneca

Day-Dreamer
03-03-2004, 06:32 PM
Originally posted by Garduna_Knight
lol np, if you want to learn more, just go to their website for info ^_^

sorry i can't help ya more, i'm from sheridan and the only other place that i kinda know is seneca

are you from four year BAA program, actually i am also applying to sheridan.I will get the result in april. I am just trying to get some infos of other school as my backup plan if I don't get into sheridan. and yeah I am international student which means studying in here is pretty expensive.:wip: I don't really care about the school name.What I am looking for is just a typical school that teaches both tradional and cg stuff .I prefer short term progam like one or two years.hey since you are from sheridan , would you like to share you daily life at sheridan ?...:buttrock:

Jason Park
03-03-2004, 06:57 PM
I am applying to Sheridan's 4 year animation program next year. I heard that they still teach little bit on computer animation in that course. Is that true? Sheridan is very famous, I don't think they earned the fame for nothing. They must have good professors and nice working environment.

This is actually my first time hearing about Centennial College. :)

Garduna_Knight
03-03-2004, 08:23 PM
nono i'm from art fundamentals there and i'm trying to get into media arts or illustration.

the teachers there are great ppl, well the ones that i got to know are :) as for the environment, its very competitive but everyone works togther during those hard times (aka project due)

when you get into the 4 bba, you need to know that the first 2.5-3 years are classical animation. they do this bcasuse they want to you have a good backbone before you get into the cg stuff, last year is pure cg I THINK

day dreamer, if ur thinking of a 1-2 year program i would suggest you look elsewhere since sheridan dont have anyof that for the post secondary programs BUT they do have em for the post grad

daily life at sheridan hhhmmmmm

1) wake up and do the morning thing
2) walk to sheridan for a god 20 minutes
3) go to school (if early) chat with some friends that i know and from grenville (mini staples) or go straight to class
3) do the class thing, chat more if its a easy class do more work and be serious for the importatn classes.
4) ususally there is a break in between the calss. during that time, chill at the main study hall where the ygot a lighttable and various working stations there.
5) break over, go back and do more stuff
6) if i got next class repeat if not go home and do work or just hang out with friends at the lounge in the illustration wing location :)

it can vary qutie a bit depending on the workload and social time :)

Jason Park
03-04-2004, 12:09 PM
I heard that animation program is pretty intense (a lot of work). By any chance, do you know anyone from 4year animation program? :)

Garduna_Knight
03-04-2004, 04:55 PM
ya i know some ppl from animation BUT the bba started just last year so i don't really know ppl there BUT the 3 year diploma students i know since they occasionaly tutor fundies studnets in and out :)

gtidhar
03-10-2004, 09:44 AM
Hello threaders!

I am my self contemplating on studying in Sheridan, but I am wondering about their portfolio requirments.

Does anyone knows what kind of work do they want to see in a portfolio?

Day-Dreamer
03-15-2004, 03:02 AM
does anyone know about the digital animation progam from Centennial College?

Day-Dreamer
03-15-2004, 05:35 AM
bump:lightbulb

Jason Park
03-23-2004, 12:10 PM
Originally posted by gtidhar
Hello threaders!

I am my self contemplating on studying in Sheridan, but I am wondering about their portfolio requirments.

Does anyone knows what kind of work do they want to see in a portfolio?
Are you asking about the requirement for the animation program or illustration program? :)

3bleadpencil
03-23-2004, 09:20 PM
the school you go to is only half the battle.....most of it is BS politics.....of 125 students who start only 30 graduate....24% is a pretty frickin' low turnout......I was lucky....i had an instructor who had 8 years of teaching 3d experience.....and also you if you work smart and hard you can do anything.....3 years to graduate at Sheridan?....if I had 3 years to fine tune my drawing skills and research on my own I think people would do amazingly great without Sheridan.....but you have to apply yourself and push yourself.......

....just make sure you know where you stand in the market..
...make sure you have a wicked ass instructor
....push yourself to never stop learning cause you can't

school?....Sheridan is over rated....of the 100 who don't graduate everyyear Sheridan keeps that money to attract more prospects only to have 30 graduate the following year.....

plus companies who hire will tell a lot about you based on your portfolio.....

my 2cent's

bentllama
03-24-2004, 02:09 AM
Originally posted by 3bleadpencil
school?....Sheridan is over rated....of the 100 who don't graduate everyyear Sheridan keeps that money to attract more prospects only to have 30 graduate the following year.....

plus companies who hire will tell a lot about you based on your portfolio.....

my 2cent's

and of those folios that I review if I immediately recognize a "good" school on their resume I give the reel a good look at...

you cannot deny the track record of graduates from good schools...there is a reason why said schools are highly regarded...

/counterpoint

3bleadpencil
03-24-2004, 04:42 AM
bentllama:....my bad....I was just venting at how schools make a lot of money of students......but I'm pretty sure that happens everywhere....I just feel for those students who don't graduate and end up working at McDonalds just to pay their student loans.
Also schools use "good" work of recent graduates to attract potential students......it's a business I guess.

but 100 people don't graduate.....?.....that's an amazing number out of what 120 people ?...

oh well
Regards
C.

bentllama
03-24-2004, 04:54 AM
Originally posted by 3bleadpencil

but 100 people don't graduate.....?.....that's an amazing number out of what 120 people ?...

oh well
Regards
C.

attrition is everywhere.

the best schools use attrition to keep the graduates respectable in the industry. this is why when you view folios from graduates of schools that let anyone in and anyone stay, the folios as a group are much weaker.

garbage in, garbage out.

I remember facing the reality of attrition everytime I sat down with professors accross from me at each 6month assessment. a box of kleenex, your professors and you. your very future in the course dependant on whether or not your work is up to par. harsh? I think not. reality my friend. the better person gets the better job.

Jeffo
03-24-2004, 11:22 AM
harsh? I think not. reality my friend. the better person gets the better job.

very true, i would rather hear it then, instead of spending more money, finishing the course, and not being able to find work. :cry:

I myself went to Seneca, Digital Media Arts. It is generally a broad program that gives you a little taste of everything, its then up to you to take it to the next level. And im sure this goes with every school mentioned, if you do just what you have to, to pass... it wont cut it. Theres way too many people that, eat, breathe, and sleep this stuff, competition is everywhere.

but in the end, it comes down to your skill, which was mentioned. The "sheridan" on the demo reel may get your demo reel into the right hands, but if its crap, im sure it would get tossed just as quick.

im not sure what area of 3d you would like to get into, but i know seneca just opened up a game development course, i hear its pretty solid as well.

Good luck in your decision my friend! :thumbsup:

Jason Park
03-24-2004, 12:10 PM
Only around 24% of people graduate? Wow... I guess even though I get in, I will still be dying. :hmm:

Nightfall02
04-03-2004, 06:03 AM
I had to come in and give my 2 cents on the matter.

Sheridan was an excellent school to go to during the '90s. It was the top school if you wanted to get into animation and even computer animation.

However, it has lost a lot in the past years since new schools have been opening up and offering competing programs. Sheridan only thrives on its past reputation at this stage since demo reels coming from other schools with lower standards are up to par if not superior than those coming out of Sheridan.

Also, Sheridan's high standards and long years of study don't mean that their artists will come out superior. Students coming out of Algonquin College or even Vancouver Film School have shown tremendous talents, even from a 2 year program as opposed to the 3 year program Sheridan offers.

In terms of computer animation, Seneca College offers excellent training. I'm sure Centennial's fairly new programs are ranking high as well.

Bottom line, I think too many people are uninformed and should look into this more closely instead of directing everyone straight to Sheridan without a second thought.

My 2 cents.

bentllama
04-03-2004, 09:25 AM
Originally posted by Nightfall02
Sheridan only thrives on its past reputation at this stage since demo reels coming from other schools with lower standards are up to par if not superior than those coming out of Sheridan.

My 2 cents.

You must have different reservations about talent. Most of the demo reels I get/review from many schools other than Sheridan [and a handful of other reputable schools who do have a history of talented grads] have increasingly found their way into the recyle bin or trash bag...

...up to par? not really...many strikes over par, because those reels are consistently missing the hole-in-one

if I may ask, with this being such an important thread for you to spend your virgin post upon, what is your educational background and have you ever been wronged by sheridan or one of its grads?

Nightfall02
04-04-2004, 06:52 PM
Originally posted by bentllama
You must have different reservations about talent.

You're misinterpreting my post. I never alluded to the fact that talented people get into Sheridan. I'm talking about the quality of education other students can seek, and find in different schools.

I have reviewed demo reels from different schools and sifted through various portfolios, and I'm basing my opinion on not only this fact, but from the many people I've had a chance to converse with.

It's also a known fact that you learn much more and progress as an artist once you start working in the industry. So having someone learn the basics for 3 years won't necessarily show superior to someone learning for 2 years and progressing in the business for 1 year.

I'm not discounting Sheridan entirely. I'm simply offering my opinion that there are alternatives, and in my opinion, those are better.

My virgin post? Well, I stumbled upon this thread and felt the need to comment. Simple as that.

private
04-05-2004, 12:18 AM
Originally posted by bentllama
and of those folios that I review if I immediately recognize a "good" school on their resume I give the reel a good look at...


That's sounds both elitist and with bias. If you're required by your employer to review demo reels, shouldn't you be on the look out for excellent and exceptional demo reels? It shouldn't matter what school they went to, but the demo, yes? If you're taking a "good look at" other demo reels, maybe someone else should be reviewing them.

A good school helps, but there are many, many good schools, as well as bad. To get branded by the school you went to is not fair. In addition, it's impossible to know all the good schools, thus, for your company's sake, hopefully all the good demo reels get a "good look at".

/counterpoint

bentllama
04-05-2004, 05:03 AM
Originally posted by private
That's sounds both elitist and with bias. If you're required by your employer to review demo reels, shouldn't you be on the look out for excellent and exceptional demo reels? It shouldn't matter what school they went to, but the demo, yes? If you're taking a "good look at" other demo reels, maybe someone else should be reviewing them.

A good school helps, but there are many, many good schools, as well as bad. To get branded by the school you went to is not fair. In addition, it's impossible to know all the good schools, thus, for your company's sake, hopefully all the good demo reels get a "good look at".

/counterpoint

elitism...no.
bias...perhaps.

whenever I personally review demo reels I am always on the lookout for breakout talent and great potential, no matter what the person's background.

there will always be the good pile, the okay pile and the bad pile of reels. when reviewing hundreds of demo reels a year you start to see a pattern emerge within all of those piles. there are many factors that identify the sucess of a demo reel and its classification into one of those piles. schooling happens to be one of those factors.

if you consitently check the schooling background of the reels that made the good pile, you will see that most of them come from some form of responsible schooling...and there are several schools that are repeatedly attributed to thier students producing solid demo reels.

there are the few reels that stun you and have no background towards reputable schools. those reels stand on thier own merit, because the work is very good. every reel stands on its own if the work is stellar. however, you persistently see good demo reels come from students at good responsible facilities, you cannot deny that fact. you also cannot deny that there are poor submissions from students of the same schools, but those are few and far between.

when I get a box of reels to look at they are already pre-sceened by a non-artist type to meet certain criteria for the position. comments are made before I view the reel as to what the strongest points are to look out for, how long the reel is, whether to mute it because a Matrix soundtrack song is blaring on it, etc... be it experience or pure aesthetic atrocity that even a non-artist can witness, the reels go through a screening process before they get to an artist. every single reel that comes through the door gets viewed, but it is natural to save the time of the production artists by using several categories to screen the reels. identifying the reels by school and its history of quality products is only one of those categories.

many studios use the practice of HR or a non-artist type of person to deal with demo reels as the first step of the process.
many of them also categorize the reels based upon experience, education, current location/nationality, etc. there are many factors that come into play when trying to fill a position, so do not think that schooling is the only one...

still, every reel gets viewed...

every reel has a chance, and like I said in an interview here:
http://www.dperry.com/articles/walpole/index.htm

"Let your work speak for itself"

bentllama
04-05-2004, 05:07 AM
Originally posted by Nightfall02
It's also a known fact that you learn much more and progress as an artist once you start working in the industry. So having someone learn the basics for 3 years won't necessarily show superior to someone learning for 2 years and progressing in the business for 1 year.

good point! there is definately this bubble you burst when out in the industry trying to make a name for yourself.

thanks for sharing your thoughts Nightfall02.

Jason Park
04-06-2004, 12:50 PM
I've heard that now Sheridan's 4 year animation program includes experience in a real studio. Also, their program now includes basics of computer animation.

bentllama
04-07-2004, 05:48 AM
Originally posted by bentllama
schooling happens to be one of those factors.

...and don't even get me started on the importance of schooling for immigration process...

THX
04-07-2004, 06:41 AM
i went to sheridan for a year than dropped out was a very bad experience for me not to mention i lost a ton of money(tuition fees).:hmm:

kjc
04-07-2004, 07:14 AM
I'm considering applying for Sheridan's Bachelor of Applied Arts Animation next year. If I put up a portfolio URL (in a few month's) would the people attending there right now, or having done the previous course, notably bentllama :thumbsup: advise me on what needs improving/if it's a reasonable submission compared to theirs when they were accepted??

I'd also really appreciate immediate advice so I can get cracking on building a new portfolio. Few of the main things right now being, are lifedrawing submissions on slides acceptable OR are they ALL that's acceptable to showcase LD.
Is a range of different media important. Will it matter for example if I don't have much colour work or all my lifedrawing is with charcoal..?
Are finished pieces more/equally important compared with quick gestural studies?
Is there a specific assignment they send out once you have submitted your application or is it purely on your own personal work you are judged?


saw response few pages back just now, my bad. any other tips anyways?
Appreciate any tips/information you guys can give me.
Thanks.

bentllama
04-07-2004, 08:59 AM
Originally posted by kjc
I'd also really appreciate immediate advice

lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing lifedrawing

kjc
04-07-2004, 12:07 PM
understood! away I go

Cheers

Jason Park
04-07-2004, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by kjc
I'm considering applying for Sheridan's Bachelor of Applied Arts Animation next year. If I put up a portfolio URL (in a few month's) would the people attending there right now, or having done the previous course, notably bentllama :thumbsup: advise me on what needs improving/if it's a reasonable submission compared to theirs when they were accepted??

I'd also really appreciate immediate advice so I can get cracking on building a new portfolio. Few of the main things right now being, are lifedrawing submissions on slides acceptable OR are they ALL that's acceptable to showcase LD.
Is a range of different media important. Will it matter for example if I don't have much colour work or all my lifedrawing is with charcoal..?
Are finished pieces more/equally important compared with quick gestural studies?
Is there a specific assignment they send out once you have submitted your application or is it purely on your own personal work you are judged?


saw response few pages back just now, my bad. any other tips anyways?
Appreciate any tips/information you guys can give me.
Thanks.
Hey friend, I am planning to apply to Sheridan's animation program next year just like you! We are in the same situation aren't we? :D If you want, I can tell you all the things you need to have in your portfolio for the 4-year animation program. I am going to start making my own portfolio soon. Yes, I still have a year left, but I don't want to rush at the very end. :)

If you want more information, advice and other goodies, you can PM me and I'll be glad to help (if you want to keep things private, that is). :thumbsup:

Day-Dreamer
04-07-2004, 06:11 PM
life drawing , perspective , learn a bit of how to construct cartoon character , some basic storyboarding

icedeyes
04-11-2004, 09:21 PM
Hi everyone... I am in the army right now (and for the next 7 months or so) but i am thinking of my postgraduate studies very seriously at this time and sheridans was one of the schools that i thought of applying (for the effects degree to be exact)... I have a bachelors degree in multimedia, a portfolio of 3d work, some work experience on 3d (1 1/2 years) but no 2d background whatsoever... Would i get accepted in sheridans considering all the afore mentioned or should i start looking for other schools? What worries me most is my lack of knowledge on traditional artwork and drawing... Thanks in advance for any replies

kjc
04-12-2004, 11:39 PM
sure thing Jason, hit me with the info.

icedeyes, I'd say you need what everyone has listed thus far. I'll be spending my time doing lifedrawing, animal studies etc. I think a strong grasp on perspective is pretty much a necessity also.

Jason Park
04-13-2004, 12:16 PM
Sure, I'll be sending the information soon. ;)

abohmed
10-05-2004, 11:15 AM
any one knows abour vancouver film school pleasei want to know more abou 3d animation and visual effects course

AirbORn
10-05-2004, 01:55 PM
Sheridan, is the best school for animation in the Toronto area if not the world, second best would probably be the York University/Senaca College program, which I heard is good from people who attend it. I Take Design at York and we are on the same floor with them.

Avoid Academy of design at all costs.!!!

Garduna_Knight
10-06-2004, 01:46 AM
hihi all, wow i haven't been here in AWHILE!

anywho I heard that the Vancover school was pretty good but best in Canada would be Sheridan. the competitions is fierce as HELL. hell i'm THERE! well in media arts (film and tv) but i know i bunch of ppl in animation there that work their buts off.

only reason why seneca/york got a good animation program for the past 2 years is simple. there was a sheridan teacher that had favorites in his class, sheridan "powers that be" didn't like it. they bumped him to art fundamentals teacher and he still had favorites. so they fired him. he joined seneca soon after and applied all of his previous sheridan learning skillz and techniques in making a really good program that seneca now has. kinda funny isn't it?

AirbORn
10-06-2004, 04:21 AM
only reason why seneca/york got a good animation program for the past 2 years is simple. there was a sheridan teacher that had favorites in his class, sheridan "powers that be" didn't like it. they bumped him to art fundamentals teacher and he still had favorites. so they fired him. he joined seneca soon after and applied all of his previous sheridan learning skillz and techniques in making a really good program that seneca now has. kinda funny isn't it?
I had no idea, that is very interesting and usefull info, thanks :)

It is amazing how one person can build a program up to a good reputation in such a short amount of time. lol! Well, the more the marrier.

Thanks!

abohmed
10-06-2004, 05:52 AM
hello
i just want to chose between vfs and sheridan
in vfs i want to enter 3d animation and visual effects and its one year??? i mean how cauld i learn everything in one year i mean how cauld i have experience in one year


and sheridan is hard to get into computer animation program so i have first to do art fundamential then study 4 years 2d animation and the 2nd and 3rd year you can study 3d if you want to then when i finish i enter computer animation you know i loooooooooove to do that but i am not bill gates sun??? its costs a lot
so can you please help???

Anim8rJB
10-06-2004, 08:55 AM
Sheridan College is all right - although nowhere near the animation factory is was in the mid-1990's. Graduates of the 2d program are lucky to get a job doing Flash, and I haven't seen a reel out of the 3d program in a looong time. Either way, the school's name doesn't carry the weight it used to (yes, I'm a graduate). Look to Seneca for a cheaper, yet equally good alternative. I would also recommend VFS over both of those.

AirbORn
10-06-2004, 01:24 PM
Well that last post pretty much summed it up.

Let us know what school you pick. :)

Garduna_Knight
10-06-2004, 02:04 PM
I had no idea, that is very interesting and usefull info, thanks :)

It is amazing how one person can build a program up to a good reputation in such a short amount of time. lol! Well, the more the marrier.

Thanks!
ya i know, it suprised the hell of of me too when i found out. heh

well to be honest in what school you should pick, i really is up to you and if you feel comfortable in "that certain kind of leanring environment" whether it be seneca or sheridan, that is the right choice i think.

tradigital
10-08-2004, 09:53 PM
You should really check out my school...
St. Clair College Tradigital Animation Program in Windsor Ontario...
We have an intensive 3 year program teaching both 2D and 3D. We're fairly new..just 5 years. We probably have the best full time staff/student ratio in Canada and our tutition is half the price of Sheridan. Our web site is under contruction at the moment but check out www.tradigital.ca (http://www.tradigital.ca) and you can get a good idea what we are about.
We are just on the border with Detroit but don't hold that against us........

abohmed
10-09-2004, 11:45 AM
can you tell us more about iy please hpw much it cost and how i get in the requirments and why its not so famous and pleasee tell us more

kaulvirus
10-09-2004, 01:58 PM
does anyone know about the digital animation progam from Centennial College?

Hi Day Dreamer....
Sorry for the late reply.. but I am a centennial Grad...if you still have any questions....pls feel free to ask me.

tradigital
10-11-2004, 01:55 PM
It depends what you mean by "famous schools". Sheridan is a famous school because its been around for a while and had the benefit of being the only game in town for a long time. But now there are many, many animation schools. St. Clair hasn't been around very long but we have an excellent curriculum, part of it based on the best of other schools. Much of our 2D is based on Sheridan's curriculum when it was actually good; probably because we have a couple Sheridan grads teaching. Sheridan has had its problems the last few years and I don't think anyone would say that it is the best animation school anymore. If there is any benefit to Sheridan, its that they attract (based on their reputation) very good animation students and they weed them out by graduation so you could argue that its the students that are keeping that school in the headlines, not the course or teachers.
Many other "famous" schools have full time marketing personal with large budgets (paid for through your tuition) ...VFS and Ringling just to name a few....That gets the schools name out there and attracts students willing to pay tuition in the 10s of thousands but I don't think you are getting better animators.
When I was hiring animators, I got frustrated with the candidates not having any proper animation skills. They knew Maya, or whatever but they hadn't spent the time actually learning how to animate. You need to go to a good school that spends the time teaching this stuff and then have the time to practice practice practice. I think you can get that at St. Clair and the tuition is only in the $4500 range....not $20000 like some of the famous schools.
www.tradigital.ca (http://www.tradigital.ca)

seema
11-04-2004, 01:43 PM
I here that Sheridan college is one of the best without doubt!!
I am a rigging artist from India. I applied for computer Animation program at Sheridan. I did not make it as my art skills were not good enough. They suggest I take the Art Fundament course in order to strengthen my skills. I m just worried as to whether i m deviating too much. I want to be a character TD. Do I need to learn art Fundamentals. If not, What would be the course I should really look at? I m very confused....somebody help!!

seema
11-04-2004, 01:48 PM
I here that Sheridan college is one of the best without doubt!!
I am a rigging artist from India. I applied for computer Animation program at Sheridan. I did not make it as my art skills were not good enough. They suggest I take the Art Fundament course in order to strengthen my skills. I m just worried as to whether i m deviating too much. I want to be a character TD. Do I need to learn art Fundamentals. If not, What would be the course I should really look at? I m very confused....somebody help!!

Garduna_Knight
11-04-2004, 11:10 PM
first of all what is ur skill level in terms of fine arts. nobody can help you until you give us some background as to how long you have been drawing

seema
11-05-2004, 02:53 AM
I have no art back ground,I have a computer science degree. I have good programming skills. I am very comfortable working with MEL. Do I need to know art if I want to be a charater TD or a creature developer? Should I take an art course at sheridan and then apply for animation course? Is that the right thing to do in order to achieve my goal?

kaulvirus
11-05-2004, 03:28 AM
HI Seema,

I would like to clarify a couple of things. Primarily, look at the financial front, myself being an Indian, I know it becomes pretty expensive to study in Canada and doing fundamental +post grad courses after that..it definitely puts a hole in your pocket. Secondly, the other factor which you should consider is "are you actually willing to spend 2+ years ( 1yr fundamental and alteast 1 more yr for your post grad digital animation course at Sheridan) in school? I am not saying that an art fundamental course is not important...I bet it is but the question still remains....1) the cost of the complete education (mind it, being an international student, you might have to shell out more) 2) are you willing to go back to school and spend 2 more years learning things.

Now comes the tricky part. I hope I am not pissing any sheridan grads here or somethin'....but I've had frnds and coworkers who studied with me at Centennial and later on went to get a post grad diploma in digital animation from sheridan and they tell me that the school has actually lost its touch. Its also said that most of their professors are full time teachers (old school types) who really dont have any knowledge of the present day production pipelines. I also heard that their digital animation program is kinda messed up but their 2d and art courses are awesome. Some even went to the extent of saying that the only thing that sheridan had at this point of time was its repo....(again...whatever I wrote above were personal views of people and they can be wrong)

Thus its upto you to make up your mind...hope it helps..

Romero
11-05-2004, 07:10 AM
Well it is interesting to talk about all the schools that have been mentioned in this thread. I myself had gone to Sheridan for a year(portfolio) then on to graduate at Seneca(Digital Media Arts). I must say both schools were excellent. At Sheridan I learned alot from both the student and profs and I must say it i was very pleased i went there, especially for there figure and life drawing classes.

Seneca was also amazing. Most of the profs there were awesome and very knowledable. There new building they have opened up is unreal. They have a new classical animation course there 3 YR, and alot of the student go there now instead of Sheridan:shrug: . There were a few profs that were there from Sheridan but even still before they had got there the program was a success. I would highly recommed both schools. Sheridan is in Oakville which is about 45 mins outside Toronto. Seneca is in Toronto just north of downtown 30 mins.

They have a video game course as well as mo cap, and 3d course 2YR(ithink). The Digital Media course has now changed it's curriculem(which is a shame) Cause it was ideal for a student who was contemplateing more then one field we did 3D animation,modelling,compositing,editing,drawing,etc. really fortunate to have experienced it. Hope this info helps a little:buttrock:

Garduna_Knight
11-05-2004, 12:03 PM
just curious romero, whar are you doing now after you have graduated?

seema
11-05-2004, 01:45 PM
Thank you so much...

But besides the money aspect is it worth doing an art course to become a creature developer or a character TD? If any body knows of a good creature developer can you please let me know about thier educational background?

Any other suggestion for a "wanna be creature Developer" is very Welcome :-)

Romero
11-05-2004, 05:16 PM
Garduna Knight: Right now I have been doing free-lance magazine ad work for a bunch of different snowboard magazine:buttrock: , as well as my mickey mouse part time job:rolleyes: . I am still working on a few animation projects that will be posted here as soon as my website is complete. I am also working on a gaming mod for Doom 3 with a few friends from school. I haven't really looked for a 3d job yet because I have been busy practicing and learning new things I wanna try, as well as building up my portfolio, and I just started getting back to drawing 2Hrs/a day (I had taken a little vaction from the pencil). So I am on the verge of sending out my demos, but just have some fine details to take care of.

What about you?

mistry_chirag82
12-19-2004, 10:25 AM
I completed my Graduation in Bachelors of Engineering in Information Technology from Pune University, INDIA. Due to my very high interest in 3D Computer Gaming, i am looking forward to do my Masters in Computer Gaming Technology & Design that includes both Programming & Computer Design. after i completed my graduation i did certificate courses in MAYA, 3DSMAX & COMBUSTION, but that has not made me proficient enough to produce a good demo reel to get into a very good Universities. i have question related to which program should i opt for. some of my questions are
1.) Should i have to do any BFA or BA sort of things ie basics(Under-graduation) though i have already done my graduation.
2.) How will my Degree in Information Technology help me in Computer Gaming Program.
3.) is Computer Gaming Program too hard.
4.) Which are the good universities / Colleges in CANADA & US.
5.) How is Seneca College of Applied Arts & Technology or Vancouver Film School or Academy of Art College or Savannah College of Arts & Design for Computer Gaming Course or University of Advanced Technology.
6.) Every other College asks for a portfolio, but how can i produce a demo reel of mine own when i haven't done any graduation in Arts field.
7.) Do they select by viewing your Technical Portfolio as Computer Gaming course includes programming too.
8.) is Computer Gaming programming in more demand or Computer Gaming designer (front- end) ? who are highly paid.
9.) Is it worth spending a lot in these courses.

Please Help soon.
Chirag Mistry.(mistry_chirag82)

Jason Park
01-20-2005, 12:01 AM
So, has anyone applied to Sheridan's animation course? Today, I got a letter telling me what to submit for my portfolio! I am excited/scared. I know it will be really tough, so I am going to give all I've got! :)

walker
01-20-2005, 12:32 AM
I'm applying to Sheridan today, actually. For Seneca as well (I'm a little behind on registering, but at least they've posted the animation portfolio requirements online a long time ago, so that's kept me busy)
Expenses is what really worries me with Sheridan. :deal:

Good luck Jason! I know how ya feel :D

Jason Park
01-20-2005, 01:25 AM
I'm applying to Sheridan today, actually. For Seneca as well (I'm a little behind on registering, but at least they've posted the animation portfolio requirements online a long time ago, so that's kept me busy)
Expenses is what really worries me with Sheridan. :deal:

Good luck Jason! I know how ya feel :D
Good luck to you too! :) You never know, we could meet each other at Sheridan in September! :D

seema
02-02-2005, 02:46 PM
I had tried my luck with SHeridan for their Jan start...Unfortunately i didnt make it as my artistic skills were not good enough (actually its quite bad):sad:
They look for a lot of artistic skills..Since i want to be a creature Developer i m more techinally inclined (like MEL n stuff). I had also Appilied to VFS(Vancouver Film School) n I got my admit there:) Will B starting this June!! I m very exited!!

Good Luck to all sending their portfolios:thumbsup: BE positive

kjc
02-26-2005, 09:35 PM
Was anyone else here at the seneca orientation last night?

Garduna_Knight
02-27-2005, 06:21 AM
yep 2 and 3 years ago. but not anymore. anything special while at that orientation?

kjc
02-27-2005, 04:48 PM
What program were you applying for at the time? Well the thing that hit home while at the session was how difficult it's going to be to get in. Something like 700+ to 48 odds. Not that I hadn't thought that before but now there were faces to go with the numbers. Here's hoping I'm one the lucky few because the course looks awesome!

Garduna_Knight
02-28-2005, 12:41 AM
hope u make it man. i tried getting into the animation/graphics design/ new media programs. but at the same time i was applying for the sheridan's media arts film/tv production and when the acceptance letters came in and i saw sheridan accept me, i chose that one. overall i wanted to get into the film biz and not the fin arts so that was the path i chose. ya the odds for getting into a good arts program nowadays is very hard. the sheridan media arts program only accepts 80 ppl out of a possible 2500 applicants. with numbers like that, no wonder there's so many ppl trying to get into for the 2nd of 3rd time

Aachen
02-28-2005, 03:58 AM
Hello All,
I gruduated from Centennial College. To answer a few questions:

1.How many students would you say are in each class? 15

2.What is the Ratio of Students getting a Job and how is there placement Dept.? I gruduated in 98 at the time I would say about 80 % of the class got jobs.

Is this another school that will take trustfund babies that really have no interest or passion for the arts? No, if you don't have some kind of talent, they will not let you in.

4.How are the Teachers, are they knowlegable and what kind of experiance do you know they have? Most of the teacher there work in the indrusty. Most of the teacher were really good.Do they offer a internship as a require course? if not do you think there is enough time to intern in the middle of the course? At the end of the course, you'll have a 30 day internship.

if you had the chance to turn back time would you go back to centennial college or take a 4 year College BA Degree (if you had the money)? I'd go back to centennial college, we all have 24 hour access to our lab, we were learning, Maya Softimage and Houdini. It was very fast paced.

Any other questions, please feel free to email me.

JM

Pixelcritter
03-01-2005, 08:41 PM
This may have been mentioned before but there are too many posts to check through them all.

Anyway, about SHERIDAN COLLEGE, it is no longer a Diploma when you Graduate from the Animation Program. It is now a Degree program. They added an extra year to the old 3 year program, which will concentrate more on Computer Animation and some Film History, things like that. Once you graduate from that you have a choice of a few other 1 year programs such as Character Animation(3D) or Special Effects.

I was just accepted into the Animation program so I will be a first year student of the Animation program next year and I can't wait!

Garduna_Knight
03-01-2005, 08:54 PM
congrats Pixelcritter, ur one of the few that got accepted ^_^

bentllama
03-02-2005, 12:04 AM
congrats pixel critter...


i am a grad of the classical anim and computer anim programs at sheridan.

have fun and stock up on kleenex.

Pixelcritter
03-13-2005, 05:19 AM
I'm also learning to live without sleep. I hear that comes in handy...

Garduna_Knight
03-13-2005, 07:54 AM
congrats pixel critter...


i am a grad of the classical anim and computer anim programs at sheridan.

have fun and stock up on kleenex.

i'm just curious, what's ur profession now?

yes pixel, that trait will come in handy X_X

bentllama
03-13-2005, 08:02 PM
i'm just curious, what's ur profession now?



lead animator / technical animator / animation td / trouble maker / griefer

@ bungie studios

we just finished working on halo 2 late last year and are gearing up for our next unannounced next-gen title...

HowardB
03-13-2005, 11:56 PM
Not many Toronto film school/academy students here have commented on this thread about it so here goes. Iím about half way between the one year course and its not all that bad that people are saying.


True if had a chance to get into Sheridan I would have. All threw the ends of high school, thatís what I was aiming for, but its damn near impossible to get in. So I worked for a couple years saving up $$ and learning Max and then Maya hopping to have an edge over others to get into Sheridanís animation course.


Well that didnít work for me so I decided to get into the Toronto film school instead. Maybe the biggest problem with why the academy/Toronto film school has a bad rap is that its only a one year course, all year (4 terms) and in my opinions that certainly not enough time to learn the skills, and make a good demoReel. Many students say there just isnít enough time left to make a great reel, and the ones that do, are committed their in there 24/7 and it does show with the quality of there work over others.


I wish the school did a better job at presenting themselves, if you have ever look around on their tour you will notes all the work they present on the walls, videos/commercials is so out dated and doesnít represent what the school is all about today.


Almost all the teachers there work in the field and are totally qualified and work in the field; they know much more then what they have time to teach you in a year. The classes are small mine has 10 students and on average about 15-20 students per class. You work on up-to-date equipment and software (and some of there computers are needing replacement).


Iím certainly not a fan boy for this school OR any school for that matter. Because a school doesnít make you a good artist, only you can. Because Sheridan has such a good reputation they can filter out all the bad eggs, the ones that arenít committedÖ and after 4 years no wonder they have great people doing amazing work coming out.


Academy on the other hand accepts just about anyone as long as they got the $$ so you see why there can be more crap coming out from the end then other schools. But that doesnít mean that its all crap. Thereís just to many people that shouldnít be in there that have gotten in. but to stop that from happening you need the good reputation, the many more accepting to better filter out people. That doesnít make the school look good but it will make them lots of $$.


I find that its sort of a branch off of the rest of the school for many reasons, for instance your not even in the same part of the building as the rest of the school. I picture the school as well, a money hungry fashion school with a few GOOD technical Courses!


I went here because itís a fast paced school. I knew a lot of stuff going in beforehand, so I could focus more on my own work and learn more advanced stuff then the basics. Maybe the problem with the school is there structuring, maybe there trying to be something that there not, I donít know for sure, look at this school like all schools as just another stepping stone for bigger and better things. Which thatís what school suppose to be in the first place.


I hope this clarifies this school batter then other one sentence comments like ďdonít go to the academy, it sucks, a nono! Ē.


Questions, comments are welcome (just donít flame me to much). Id be nice to here other opinions from former and current students ÖI know Iím not the only one :)

Craiger
03-16-2005, 07:25 PM
Hey guys. I am a graduate of Sheridans Classical animation program, and a graduate of Seneca College's Maya program. Here is what i will say about Sheridan.

Stay away from that place. The school has been riding its reputation since the 80's but has done virtually nothing to improve the course. Tuition costs rise every year, and the number of qualified professional teachers drop. Two years before I started at sheridan, the tuition for one year of Classical Animation was $2400. When I began classes, it rose to $6000. By the time I left tuition was up to &7200, and now I hear it is somewhere in the area of $8000. Some other people in this forum have mentioned that when they took the course, alot of people were failed... That the school only kept the best. My graduating class in 2002 was almost 90 people. Sheridan doesn't care about the students... They don't care about quality work.... All they care about is MONEY.

When I was a student there in the years 99 - 02, I had unqualified teachers. I had teachers who simply did not show up for classes. I had teachers who did not give you any one on one time, and did not give assignments back with anysort of marking breakdown. Sure... I learned how to draw.. But I'll tell you... It was the life drawing instructors who taught me that. Gerry Zelden, Werner Zimmerman and Rick Potruff were the only teachers that gave the students what they needed. Now, Sheridan has turned into a poly technic institute... Only Gerry Zelden remains.... Werner and RIck are both teaching at Seneca College now because they don't have a "degree" in animation.... What did I learn at Sheridan?... I learned that they don't care about their students.

After I left Sheridan, I found a job at a small flash company in Halifax, where I taught myself Maya, and got to do some 3d work for them... The studio went under a year later due to bad management, and I found myself wanting to go back to school for 3d.. ( to learn the proper ways of doing things). I had heard good things about Seneca's program through friends and decided to take the course. I looked at Sheridan's 3D program and noticed that one of the teachers that was "let go" due to popular demand by the students, was actually teaching the animation part of the course. EGAD!

Things I'll say about Seneca. I loved it. The instructors were exceptionally knowledgable, easy to talk to, and readily available. The equiptment, software and environment were professional and up to date. The tuition cost ($8000) is far less than Sheridans ($12000) course. I work in a large 3d studio in Toronto now. I didn't fully understand how good the education that I recieved at Seneca was, until I entered the work force. I excell at my job, and am often called upon to troubleshoot other peoples problems.


If you are looking for a 3D school... Then Seneca has to be at the top of your list.

bentllama
03-17-2005, 01:00 AM
Craiger, the Sheridan you experience and the older one I experienced are two separate entities...things REALLY changed in the year 2000...the course got weirdly evolved and the students were extremely bitchy and determined to witch hunt certain prof's out of the school...one of the prof's did not deserve the bad press...bad times all around...I hope things have gotten better...

Werner, Zeldin and Simon were instrumental to my sucess in school and even more when I look back on what they drilled in me...

Craiger
03-17-2005, 02:49 PM
I totally agree that the old Sheridan and the current Sheridan are two completely different schools. I have to tell you though, the course did not evolve in 2000. Sheridan had been on a downward spiral for the last couple of years. The students were not just "bitchy" for the sake of being bitchy. These guys, (and myself included) were paying alot of money to take the "best animation course in north america" or so it was called. There were a few factors in the two teachers being asked to leave. I don't really have time to go into it in detail... But lets just say almost the entire third year class was asking for their tuition back.

I was there, I had one of the teachers who was asked to leave. It was long overdue.

fromblownspeakers
04-05-2005, 04:06 AM
A lot of good schools have been mentioned here. You have a good chance at finding a job eventually out of any of these schools if you put in the time. The problem with Sheridan is that it cannot live up to the myth that surrounds it. Practically everybody: nurses, garbagemen, and grandmothers know the name Sheridan and they associate with it the best animation school, guaranteed high paying job at of school, etc. A lot of this has been due to the media and word of mouth. This might have held more truth in the mid 90s when the job market was new and scarce and studios were desperate for people with the basics. Now that it is established there is much more competition and you need to be able to step in fluidly and contribute right away because there will be a person with work experience out there who can. Some graduates find jobs after doing the first year of Computer Animation at Sheridan, but not all. If you don't, then they at least have a second year option that you can apply to. When it comes down to it you really have to be interested in the medium... the field is not as glamourous as many might believe. When it comes to tuition fees, they are higher at Sheridan for many reasons... one probably being the salaries their graduates command so they charge how much they will be able to afford. But in all cases, a post-graduate education is more. If you want to do a Masters in something you are looking at 15,000 a year. I would recommend going to the school that is closet to you that has an established name. Stay as close to your family and friends as possible. You can make new friends... but what is wrong with the ones that you already have? If you have the heart and ability, things will work out.

One of my theories on Sheridan... Hot schools like Sheridan will get some hot studs who have been groomed by their highschool teachers to think they are the sh*t. Or they will hear from their peers how good they are at drawing. Etc. Some of these students then may find it hard to receive criticism, and therefore improve their work. But as well, there are always cases of some students receiving more attention then others. When it comes down to it, each artist knows what is best for his or her work. You are the expert, but you must also consider the opinions of others if you want to connect to other people and have other people enjoy your work. If you want to get into Sheridan or other schools, life drawing and all kinds of drawing is the way to go like people have mentioned. Seneca's portfolio is purely life drawings that they ask you to do. If you want to do something special, focus on storytelling skills. Study film. Do storyboards. Write stories. The story is number one. Lots of people can learn how to use a program, and the technology is forever changing. Animation principles, storytelling skills... this is what Sheridan will teach you, and that is what is important.

For those who were looking for some Sheridan College student work, you could look at this site. http://www.teletoon.com/corp/index_en.htm at the previous winners for the animation scholarships. Although it is not GREAT proof of Sheridan's success many of the winners are from Sheridan College.

I've been told that Sheridan and Seneca are both good programs because they give students a good all around experience. I'm more familiar with the work out of Sheridan then Seneca, but I've seen better work come from Sheridan. Although, I've seen some real crap come out of Sheridan... with the cheesey human eyes and ken doll like faces.For those who complained about not seeing work from Sheridan, go to their end of the term open house where they show all of the work that was completed that term. When it comes to teachers... they are serious about what they do and they are not going to bullsh*t you. And like someone said, probably the biggest benefit is being surrounded by so many other talented artists that you can feed off of.

sriramatrix
06-10-2005, 10:49 AM
Centennial College,Canada is settingup an Animation College in Hyderabad,India in collaboration with Picasso Digital Media Pvt Ltd !:bounce:

I've attended their seminar today and I liked their curriculum[8 months full time course,Fee:1.75 Lakhs INR,its nearly 4000 USD...they told us that the same course will cost 15000 USD in Canada:eek: ] Also,they liked my portfolio and conducted an English Test and the Canadian representative,Ms. Lawrence told me that I'm as good as selected !:thumbsup:

There will be only 15 students in a class and the faculty will be from The Centre for Creative Communications at Centennial College,Ontario,Canada..the classes will start in August

From what I've found on Google,it is a good college....but I've still not madeup my mind...the thing is,I've just finished my Bachelors in Computer Science[3 year degree] and I'm awaiting the results of I-CET[to do an MCA next,MCA from a good college is very valuble...compared to my BSc....BTW,MCA=>Masters in Computer Applications,its a 3 year Post Graduation Degree ]

So what do you guys suggest ? Shall I forget about MCA[which doesnt help me much in Animation Industry] and jump right into this ? Or shall I do an MCA first ?

[b]Also,Is The Centennial College a good place to learn Animation ?

Plz help me,this is an important decision that i have to take for my future:sad:

Thank You

- Sri Ram Chandra

PS:Sorry for bumping this thread...I thought that it would be wise to post this here instead of starting a new topic:)

EDIT: This is the first International Animation College to setup a facility in India...there are NO animation schools in India:rolleyes:

dguy
06-23-2005, 01:19 AM
Hi,

I am planning to apply to Sheriden, and I was wondering if anyone attending the school can give me some idea as to what they are looking for in a portfolio. Thanks.

birdybear
06-23-2005, 03:37 AM
Ok, so I saw the post and read through most of it. There seems to be so much information floating around about animation but not much illustration. I have heard and seen the results of Sheridan in regards to illustration and I think they are in the top two for Canada. I believe that besides Sheridan I would say ACAD in Calgary, Alberta. Those two schools have great turn outs in award magazines (student section).

I attended Grant MacEwan College, which also has an animation major (but to be brutally honest it is NOT worth coming to canada for and I'm not sure how many people coming out of it are animation ready). I took the Visual Communications and Design Illustration major which was great. The teachers pushed me and I got a great practicum too (I have been working there full time for two years as an illustrator). In retrospect I think I would have taken the illustration course offered in ACAD and have thought about furthering my studies there since.

My advise to people considering moving to canada to study illustration would be to check out Sheridan, the Emily Carr (havn't heard too much about it except that it's good), ACAD and Grant MacEwan (for a smaller, personal school).

zombiehellmonkey
08-07-2005, 01:34 AM
Any good post-grad schools?


:)

yellowman
08-20-2005, 06:27 AM
Hi,

I had read all the post here, and I plan my federal study in either Sheridan or Ringling school in year 2006. I come from Malaysia and work as 3D animator in Singapore. I have diploma in illustration and 6 yeas of work experienced in animation industry (TV commercial and 3G phone content). But i want to learn more on animation, story telling and create a short film by go through a solid training in school. As a foreign student, the currency convert rate is incredible expensive to me and i almost 30 so I really need to do make sure myself to get in a right school. This is what I know so far about these two schools:

Ringling School: They have very impressive show reel post on their web site and from their student works I can tell they have very good knowledge in film language and the school push their student hard enough to create their own style. And some of their story are interesting as well.:thumbsup:

Sheridan: They are famous school in classical animation with no doubt, but i saw some post said they are not as strong as past.:sad: (from the post of Craiger and I really concern about this) Now they have new degree in Apply Art. I have check their program map and read every course outline, the course structure is solid enough and they start computer class in first year, but I can feel they will more emphasize on animation and art rather than computer skill. This is what i believe more important to produce a good animator. But i still no comfortable with the things Craiger mention, cause this kind of issue happened before in my college time, some time there's some good artist without any degree but they do good job in teaching and inspire student, but after the school try to upgrade the school to university, these great lecturers have been take off from school. So is there any Sheridan student in Degree of Apply Art program can let me know more about Sheridan? And I suggest they should post their student portfolio in web site to prove their quality still remain as good as past. Especial for foreigner, their all bring more than 100K to invest themselves over here for study! :eek:

By the way what's the defference between Bachelor in Fine Art and Bachelor in Apply Art?
Any advise and opinions are welcome!

cheers
cw

To zombiehellmonkey: UCLA is very great school for Graduate in animation.

chlywly
10-04-2005, 08:08 PM
Hello all :)

I just finished reading through the entire thread and found it very informing.
I am finishing my BFa this year, visual arts at York U.

I'm interested in either the 3d animation program at Seneca or Sheridan, from what I have read here I am leaning towards Seneca, it's also only 15mins away from my home.

My portfolio definitely needs some work however. I have been slacking in drawing etc. It seems that Seneca wants a completely traditional portfolio for their 3D program, which although odd is something I have to live with :)

So I am going to get cracking on the life/perspective drawing etc. :)

Jason Park
10-14-2005, 03:23 PM
Hi,

I had read all the post here, and I plan my federal study in either Sheridan or Ringling school in year 2006. I cn ome from Malaysia and work as 3D animator in Singapore. I have diploma in illustration and 6 yeas of work experienced in animation industry (TV commercial and 3G phone content). But i want to learn more oanimation, story telling and create a short film by go through a solid training in school. As a foreign student, the currency convert rate is incredible expensive to me and i almost 30 so I really need to do make sure myself to get in a right school. This is what I know so far about these two schools:

Ringling School: They have very impressive show reel post on their web site and from their student works I can tell they have very good knowledge in film language and the school push their student hard enough to create their own style. And some of their story are interesting as well.:thumbsup:

Sheridan: They are famous school in classical animation with no doubt, but i saw some post said they are not as strong as past.:sad: (from the post of Craiger and I really concern about this) Now they have new degree in Apply Art. I have check their program map and read every course outline, the course structure is solid enough and they start computer class in first year, but I can feel they will more emphasize on animation and art rather than computer skill. This is what i believe more important to produce a good animator. But i still no comfortable with the things Craiger mention, cause this kind of issue happened before in my college time, some time there's some good artist without any degree but they do good job in teaching and inspire student, but after the school try to upgrade the school to university, these great lecturers have been take off from school. So is there any Sheridan student in Degree of Apply Art program can let me know more about Sheridan? And I suggest they should post their student portfolio in web site to prove their quality still remain as good as past. Especial for foreigner, their all bring more than 100K to invest themselves over here for study! :eek:

By the way what's the defference between Bachelor in Fine Art and Bachelor in Apply Art?
Any advise and opinions are welcome!

cheers
cw

To zombiehellmonkey: UCLA is very great school for Graduate in animation.
I'm in first year in Sheridan's Bachelor of Applied Arts - Animation course. I've been in this course/school for just a bit more than a month, but I think that their program is great. It's very fast paced and you do get a lot of work. I know that I'll have no life soon enough... :shrug:

You learn pretty much every aspect of animation, which is always good. I mean, Seneca is pretty good too, but this is the only school that gives you degree and I do believe that Sheridan has a great animation program. Just getting into the program will be very challenging. I was lucky enough to get in. :P

Ah, I'll stop babbling... I don't have enough experience to say anything in the first place. >.< Let's see the time... Oh, I gotta go to my story telling class! :)

Matellis
12-21-2005, 05:29 AM
I finished at the Internation Academy of Design(Toronto) in april this year and it was horrible. I took the digital media program and it was just a waste of time , sure I learned a little but I really mean a little, and I hung out with the animation students and they felt the same for there program.
It was weird being tought by teachers that just finished the course you are in about 2 years earlier.
Avoid it!!!

Garduna_Knight
12-21-2005, 03:56 PM
I totally agree that the old Sheridan and the current Sheridan are two completely different schools. I have to tell you though, the course did not evolve in 2000. Sheridan had been on a downward spiral for the last couple of years. The students were not just "bitchy" for the sake of being bitchy. These guys, (and myself included) were paying alot of money to take the "best animation course in north america" or so it was called. There were a few factors in the two teachers being asked to leave. I don't really have time to go into it in detail... But lets just say almost the entire third year class was asking for their tuition back.

I was there, I had one of the teachers who was asked to leave. It was long overdue.

i definately recall that incident. i'm not taking fine arts anymore though. i'm part of sheridan's media arts (film/tv) course but i remember it all since i was in the sheridan art fundamentals course at that time. i couldn't believe that they did that......

as for who's better now for animation schools, i'd say try looking someplace else, sheridan is very hard getting into and all of my friends are kinda complaining about it. the one UPside for this year i think in the animation course was that they got one of the key animators for the "incredibles" to be there for one day (guest speaker). that was definately a surprise!

Rlansford81
02-02-2006, 11:38 PM
I'm graduating SCA in the near furture and I was wondering what is a good school to get my BA at.

shyguyshilpu
02-09-2006, 06:47 AM
Hello,
I am planning to go for study in Canada to learn Visual effects. Curruntly i am working in Rhythm & Hues from last 7 months as compositor. And i've been working in this industry from last 3 years. In these 3 years i have worked as 3d animator and also as compositor. But i enjoy working as compositor more than as 3d animator and that is the reason i wanted to study Visual effects to further improve my knowledge. I am looking for colleges like vanarts & seneca. But my confusion is which college to go for. which is the better one to learn visual effects. Also on the basis of my work experience can go for masters degree without doing bachelors degree and without any arts background because i graduated in economics as major subject. There are some universities in canada offering diploma courses. I wanted to know how valuable are these diploma courses to find the job. Please let me know if there are any good colleges in canada other than vanarts and snenca to learn visual effects.

chlywly
04-13-2006, 03:06 PM
Well I applied to both Sheridan/Seneca for computer-animation, I got accepted into Sheridan, my portfolio was very good... My portfolio for Seneca was also KILLER, very well done life-drawings, however I was told I got put on to a "waiting list" b/c my portfolio didn't score high enough, I think thatís COMPLETELY bogus....

I was told before that all the classical animation students from Seneca usually apply to computer-animation and obviously they get first consideration anyways I think its ridiculous bureaucracy... I know for a fact my portfolio rocked...

I visited both schools ( Seneca is MUCH closer to me, i'm like 20mins away )... the Technology at Seneca is definitely of a higher standard, newer equipment... However sheridan is upgrading their systems, the instructors and atmosphere at sheridan seem MUCH better... I noticed Seneca had an elitest attitude and were milking their "Ryan" oscar for all its worth....


I'll probably get into both, but I think im going to go to Sheridan.

Liquid:.
04-19-2006, 10:55 PM
Hey guys. I just finished reading this (Very informative) thread, but I think I'm even more confused about school than I was before. I'm trying to decide between 3 schools now. I was originally interested in the Art institute of Vancouver, but after looking into Sheridan a bit and hearing its reputation, I decided to try it out. I applied to Sheridan and was (unsurprisingly) not selected for the Bachelor of Applied Arts - Animation program. Instead, I got accepted into the Art Fundamentals program.

After that happened, I found out about a new school (1 or 2 years old) here in Saskatoon that teaches animation. It is very small (only 11 students right now) and students get 1 on 1 attention from the teachers just about all the time. I took a tour of the place, and it's not the most state-of-the-art facility, but it has the necessary equipment. The teachers seemed like good guys, and their focus was on teaching Animation, not software that can become outdated in less than a year.

These were my two options until today. After reading this thread, I'm now interested in Seneca College. It sounds like a neat place to go, and possibly a good alternative to Sheridan.

My interest in 3D animation is mainly for the video game aspect (as I'm sure is true with a lot of people going to these courses). I would like to get involved mainly with the cinematics part, as well as the character creation and animation aspect. I've heard that the best way to go is to learn animation, not just get specific knowledge in video game creation. That way, I leave my options open, and I have a better overall knowledge of the art. The skills I have now are few. I know a bit of Maya and Photoshop, but I don't really have much skill in drawing. I believe that I have the potential to become very good at drawing with the right practice and instruction.

I'm interested in art fundamentals, and from what I've heard, the Sheridan art fundamentals program is still good, even if the animation course is "iffy." I think it might be a good idea to take the Sheridan art course, even if I don't continue on to animation at Sheridan. Then again, I could probably get a good eduation in art fundamentals here at the University of Saskatchewan and save some money.

Okay, now for my question. What should I do? Should I take an art fundamentals course before going to any animation school? Which of these three schools should I choose (or are there others I should consider)?

I'm open to just about any school in Canada, as long as I don't have to speak french to go there, and it's not ridiculously expensive. I'm not in a hurry to finish, but I would rather not spend more than 4 years on this.

Sorry for the long post, and thank you very much if you read it, and even more if you can offer some advice for a confused Saskatchewanian!

shyguyshilpu
04-20-2006, 12:58 PM
chelywly & Liquid thanks a lot to both of you for your replies. n hey i forgot to mention in my first mail that i am from rhythm & hues India & not from L.A. In India there is no university which is providing education for such 3d animation & CG related courses. there are lots of private institutes but going to such places is waste of time and money. that's why i am planning to go to canada for studies. i was thinking of going to US also for studies but the thing is US is very expensive for me and i don't have that much budget. but can anybody tell me how good the visual effects course is in Seneca college. since i am particularly interested in doing visual effects course.
(http://forums.cgsociety.org/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=3469577)

CG_opener
05-10-2006, 09:50 PM
Centennial College,Canada is settingup an Animation College in Hyderabad,India in collaboration with Picasso Digital Media Pvt Ltd !:bounce:

I've attended their seminar today and I liked their curriculum[8 months full time course,Fee:1.75 Lakhs INR,its nearly 4000 USD...they told us that the same course will cost 15000 USD in Canada:eek: ] Also,they liked my portfolio and conducted an English Test and the Canadian representative,Ms. Lawrence told me that I'm as good as selected !:thumbsup:

There will be only 15 students in a class and the faculty will be from The Centre for Creative Communications at Centennial College,Ontario,Canada..the classes will start in August

From what I've found on Google,it is a good college....but I've still not madeup my mind...the thing is,I've just finished my Bachelors in Computer Science[3 year degree] and I'm awaiting the results of I-CET[to do an MCA next,MCA from a good college is very valuble...compared to my BSc....BTW,MCA=>Masters in Computer Applications,its a 3 year Post Graduation Degree ]

So what do you guys suggest ? Shall I forget about MCA[which doesnt help me much in Animation Industry] and jump right into this ? Or shall I do an MCA first ?

[b]Also,Is The Centennial College a good place to learn Animation ?

Plz help me,this is an important decision that i have to take for my future:sad:

Thank You

- Sri Ram Chandra

PS:Sorry for bumping this thread...I thought that it would be wise to post this here instead of starting a new topic:)

EDIT: This is the first International Animation College to setup a facility in India...there are NO animation schools in India:rolleyes:

Hey, Watch their promo video. It would be helpful for you to know more about the school.

http://www.thecentre.centennialcollege.ca/animation/CCDA.mov (http://www.thecentre.centennialcollege.ca/animation/CCDA.mov)

I know some people at Centennial, and I heard that it is good school compare to Seneca or Sheridan.

KEdwards
05-19-2006, 04:34 AM
Hey guys, have you seen the lost boys learning thread that has been popping up in the news section? Looks like they r specializing in VFX training... ("a division of lost boys studios" www.lostboys-studios.com (http://www.lostboys-studios.com/)) It is a pretty new school but it's hard to find an affordable canadian school that will train VFX... Hmmm.

huskmurfy
07-31-2006, 08:04 PM
hi all,
well i have heard alot abt sheridian that's cool.
what if i say i aminterested in vfx and lighting,can somebody suggest me a cheaper but good college that can make me specialize in these fields.
i'd like to have comments abt vanarts in vancover.


thanx

Silken Shadow
08-01-2006, 04:37 AM
I did some mega research before picking the school I'm at right now. I live about 4 hours north of Toronto in North Bay and I decided to pursue 3D animation.

My choices were - Sheridan - take their classical animation program for three years and then take their 2 year post-graduate computer animtion program (which used to be one year).

Seneca - take a program called Digital Media Arts. I don't know if you're thinking the same as me.. but I asked myself, "What the hell does that mean??!?!" Did some research, it's more of an all around program. A little bit of modeling, a little bit of animation.. some 2D.. some 3D.. some video editing.. just all around media art stuff. I have two friends currently taking this course.

Algonquin - I didn't hear great things from this program.

Humber - Same deal, didn't really hear much. Though now they are being featured on Alias Wavefront's site here and there, so they can't be doing all that bad.

Lastly, my school of choice (which is NEVER talked about) - St. Clair College - they have a brand new program called Tradigital Animation. It's a 3 year program combining both classical animation and computer animation together in one. The first year focuses on 2D animation and the basic concepts needed to become an "animator".. dun dun DUN. 2nd year is split right down the middle, both 2D and 3D.. but most students (like myself) focused on the 3D work. I will be returning for my 3rd year coming September. By this time, there isn't anymore teaching, squash and stretch, timing, perspective.. we all know it, and use it everyday. It's time to show off our mad skills. We will be doing one major 2D project along with a few 3D peices. When I mean peices, I mean 2-3 month work period.

We have 3D animation lab of about 40 dual Xeon 2gig machines, a 2D animation lab where every student has their own animation desk with a light table with space to put their work. It's a great atmosphere with DVD players, projectors, sound systems..and the best part is that it's open 24/7 - all day, everyday. Even weekends.

We just had our first set of graduates this year, and I know my class is going to blow their work out of the water. We have some amazing stuff and you'll see.. we'll have our name in the industry soon enough.

When I first entered this program, I figured it was just a step in the door and I would have to go to Sheridan and take their Computer Animation program.. but I was wrong. I've got a leg in the door, and I'm break it down.

Our site hasn't been updated since last year, but it should have new stuff this summer.
http://www.stclairc.on.ca/programs/departments/animation/

I'm really glad someone mentioned these schools because they get very little buzz! But you know what gets mentioned EVEN LESS then St.Clair? Loyalist College!

They used to have a 1 year post-grad animation diploma program but because of its success it has been turned into a full 3 year program (New Media Production and Animation). The first set of graduates will be done in spring '07 and they hope that once the full program is well off the ground they will offer the post-grad again as well. It's a very nice small school with really great (and funny!) teachers. It's located in Belleville which is roughly 2 hours north of T.O. on the 401 if you have any questions about Loyalist just contact me and I'll give you the low down. here are a couple links for the college and the program.

http://www.loyalistc.on.ca/ -mainsite
http://www.loyalistc.on.ca/Loyalist/index_e.aspx?DetailID=211 -program discription & costs
http://www.loyalistc.on.ca/Loyalist/index_e.aspx?DetailID=390 -detailed course discription

Garduna_Knight
08-01-2006, 04:48 AM
These were my two options until today. After reading this thread, I'm now interested in Seneca College. It sounds like a neat place to go, and possibly a good alternative to Sheridan.

My interest in 3D animation is mainly for the video game aspect (as I'm sure is true with a lot of people going to these courses). I would like to get involved mainly with the cinematics part, as well as the character creation and animation aspect. I've heard that the best way to go is to learn animation, not just get specific knowledge in video game creation. That way, I leave my options open, and I have a better overall knowledge of the art. The skills I have now are few. I know a bit of Maya and Photoshop, but I don't really have much skill in drawing. I believe that I have the potential to become very good at drawing with the right practice and instruction.

I'm interested in art fundamentals, and from what I've heard, the Sheridan art fundamentals program is still good, even if the animation course is "iffy." I think it might be a good idea to take the Sheridan art course, even if I don't continue on to animation at Sheridan. Then again, I could probably get a good eduation in art fundamentals here at the University of Saskatchewan and save some money.

Okay, now for my question. What should I do? Should I take an art fundamentals course before going to any animation school? Which of these three schools should I choose (or are there others I should consider)?


Sorry for the long post, and thank you very much if you read it, and even more if you can offer some advice for a confused Saskatchewanian!

at this moment just like what chlywly said, seneca now has this "i'm the best" attitude, just like how sheridan was like a few years back. right now i'd say both are pretty dead even since sheridan is getting some new equipement and we already know of seneca's new facilities. I haven't checked the prices for the programs as of yet so i can't help you there atm.

as for the things you will be learning at sheridan AND seneca, both will apply heavily towards life drawing as well as perspectives. sheridan has a tendency to stay more traditional and have a year MORE of life drawing than seneca. in the final year(s) in both colleges, they will teach you maya and other useful cg oriented programs. I've seen some pretty sick demo reels in cgsociety of vancover film shool ppl here so maybe that's also something to consider?

speaking from experince, the sheridan art fundamental program now is split in 2. one for fine arts and one for animation. personally, 4 years back when i was learning it, it was dreadful. i learned a lot since i wasn't doing ANY fine arts back than but in all honest compared to waht u would be learning in the illustration of animation program, it was bad. PLUS the real reason to go there is that u would get a better chance of getting in the following year of the program you wanted to get into.

as for considering which one to go to, that's totally up to you and really i can't really help you decide, will i can't be a key part of helping u decide. all i can do is tell you what i think and waht is going on in sheridan since i go there for the film/tv course (aka media arts) and i'm going in my final year, thank god!

i hope this helps Liquid.

btw i was born in Calgary so we're both Albertians ^_^

chlywly, have u found a place to stay at in oakville or are u gonna be commuting everyday?

khurrum_j
08-11-2006, 01:12 PM
Does anyone know about this college? Anyone attended?

They seem to be enrolling for Sep '06 Term. It looks like a nice place to learn animation.

What I liked about their program (listed on their site), is the fact they are focused on the art of animation itself, and thats the basics they start with. From there on, I believe its all digital. But by the looks of it, they are a nice facility. The teachers there are well known and seem to have taken over the management from their previous owners.

Any thoughts?

Note: I tried contacting them several times but didnt get any response. The telephone is on answering machine. And no replies to my email as well. Just thought i'd mention it.

Imhotep397
08-11-2006, 03:17 PM
First off im only going to speak of sheridan since i am a student in their classical animation program. I cant really give any info on the Other animation schools. I knew right out of highschool i wanted to go to sheridan Not Only for its reputation but for the work that i have seen coming out of there compared to other schools. IM not saying is IS the best school But rather im saying it IS a GREAT school. And these days i see ALot of good work comming out of


Personally, I agree with seer. I didn't go to school in Canada, but I think it holds true that the institution contributes less than 1/3 to the ultimate success of their students and I think that's a good thing. If the school contributed more than that you really would have a cookie cutter situation where everyone comes out doing the exact same thing and that's a horrible thing to have happen especially on the post-graduate level. The academic institution is really supposed to just be there to support and encourage the development of the artist not create it. I got my Master's degree from NYU at the Center for Advanced Digital Applications and all of the people that I knew well that I thought would become hugely successful have become hugely successful and it had to with what they knew before they got into the program, their personality in general and their work ethic. The faculty, in my opinion, did an exceptional job of facilitating development in most cases.

LucentDreams
08-11-2006, 07:10 PM
schools are always going to be only as good as what you put into them. In canada theres only two schools I'd recommend, Sheridan, and Vancouver Film School. Sheridan will give the better base and independence, you will take a lot more artistic theory that you will at VFS and its a steadier more managable pace, VFS is a in and out no time to sleep program but if you really apply yourself it can get you into the industry a lot faster, that said, you'll also find VFS students often have a more difficult time settling in when they do get their first break, because they haven't had time to become fluent in more than a very small area, even if you specialize in modeling, you jsut dont have time to really explore many techniques and styles so if you do two amazing realistic models, and get hired at a game studio that puts you on weird stylized creatures, you may find yourself struggling.

Honeslty in Canada I wouldnt' recommend any other school for CG.

for 2D again I'd recommend those two as well as Van Arts, and Emily Carr, though I'd put a big warning on EmilyCarr that they won't prepare you for the working world of animation, they prepare you for being an indepent animator, much like those doing stuff for the NFB.

Put it to you this way though, how many have seen a student animation from sheridan or VFS on Much Music, I know I have, has anyone seen any from other schools? What are the two most plugged schools on CGsociety/cgtalk. Ringling and VFS.

I'd basically put it this way

Cal Arts = Sheridan
Ringling = VFS.

If your looking specifically into animation, also consider Animation Mentor.

arkkitekktura
08-18-2006, 02:43 PM
This school offers a two and a half years of education for the half price of most school around the country, and the program covers all the areas that you need to start in the industry. check it out.
http://www.digitalartschool.com/

meherzad
05-25-2007, 07:34 PM
hey guys im planning on the VFX course at Seneca.. anyone has any idea on how it is.. everyone is talking about the animation programs but in specific what about the VFX program..

Devvv
06-28-2007, 08:37 AM
Sorry for bumping a very old thread.. I didn't want to make a new one.

I want to study classical 2d animation and possibly get a job as a flash character animator. Anyone know of a good school in Vancouver that offers a program on that? I know of one school that offers a similar program to what I want and that's Capilano. Are there any other alternative to this school? Not interested in VFS. Way too costly and I heard their 2D animation program is going through some changes. Thanks in advance!

JustKeepDrawing
06-28-2007, 11:02 AM
I just checked Sheridan Coledge and i like it but i could not find on the site how much the digital character animation program costs.Someone knows ?

HowardB
06-29-2007, 08:37 AM
I just want to put out a reminder out to all you people that are looking for schools in and around the Toronto area to STAY CLEAR of IADT aka Toronto Film School! Iíve been there and its not pretty.


I canít believe the complete lack communication and respect between the administration and the alumni. You are way better off getting some good learning DVDís and buying a nice fast computer and learn it on you own, if you donít have the drive to do that, then this industry probably isnít for you.


When I break down the 22 thousand dollars this course cost me looks like this. First term was ALL widely used tutorials from books (waste of 5-6 grand if you ask me). Last term was almost all devoted to yourself working on your demoreel which they wrongly lay out the ground work in the previous 3 terms (getting you to try and make a witty short story they can use in there TV ads).

And in that last term you donít even get a teacher, just a T.A. Thatís right! They save themselves even more cash by not having a real teacher to help you ( donít become a TA like I did, they pay you jack s**t!). So your really only paying 6 months of actual schooling, the other 6 months is just BS at the ridicules cost of 22 grand. Its sickening how much this school can takes from there students and leaves them with nothing in return.


They had this film festival at the end of the year where you could submit your reel and possibly win some cash and an award. And I did, and won! But when I went up on stage to receive my award I was told they lost it. They never even got my check ready for the date they said it would be ready onÖand now after countless polite emails for well over a year and a half to Rick Bennett (Coordinator, Film Production) and John Foote (Director of Toronto film school) and being brushed off with one sentence email replys Iíve given up.. what a bunch of turds they are! I didnít even care about it, just the principle of the thing.

Besides myself, no one in my class got a job in this industry, and I can think of a hand full of people from grades above and below me I know of that have successfully landed jobs after 2 years of completion of this course. And they were destined to get jobs with or without IADTís help. This school will leave the majority of its graduates jobless with huge debts to pay for years to come, trust me on this.

mariolmoura
09-19-2007, 07:12 PM
Does anyone there would give a tip about a good 3D course in Vancouver or any other place in Canada. VFS for example, they do not offer any short term course. So I can only afford 3 mounths for this goal.

Thenk for attention

kelgy
09-21-2007, 01:13 AM
for 2D again I'd recommend those two as well as Van Arts, and Emily Carr, though I'd put a big warning on EmilyCarr that they won't prepare you for the working world of animation, they prepare you for being an indepent animator, much like those doing stuff for the NFB.

**When I went in for my EC interview, they had two instructors interviewing me. One said they believe in throwing out all your work and starting from fresh with a new perspective. the other one said he didnt understand why i was making demonic creatures(ignoring the angels I did along with them) when his 6 year old daughter did faeries and nice things.
Hopefully you can see the problem with his statement.

EC did not have a good reputation because it was anti-representational and its foundation year was ridiculous. I hope it changed.

mariolmoura
09-21-2007, 06:03 PM
I will check it out.

krisbfunk
11-23-2007, 06:56 PM
This school offers a two and a half years of education for the half price of most school around the country, and the program covers all the areas that you need to start in the industry. check it out.
http://www.digitalartschool.com/

Does anyone have anything to say about this school? I haven't seen great work from their online examples.

tarun jain
11-23-2007, 07:54 PM
I have been an animator for over four years now,currently doing the Digital Character Animation course form Sheridan.This is the advanced course that they have......I have found the course to be way behind the current standards in the kindaexcersices that they have.It specially lacks in the technical area.The rigging techniques ,that is being taught is years old.I would not reccomend the computer animation course from Sheridan.

colesslaw
11-23-2007, 08:37 PM
Does anyone have anything to say about this school? I haven't seen great work from their online examples.

never even heard of this school.

Garduna_Knight
11-23-2007, 08:49 PM
I have been an animator for over four years now,currently doing the Digital Character Animation course form Sheridan.This is the advanced course that they have......I have found the course to be way behind the current standards in the kindaexcersices that they have.It specially lacks in the technical area.The rigging techniques ,that is being taught is years old.I would not reccomend the computer animation course from Sheridan.

agreed, at this time, their animation, film courses (from the time that i was there) and even know are bad, definately don't go to Sheridan until they get their act together

bobbers
11-23-2007, 09:03 PM
Anyone know anything about Red River College's (Winnipeg) Digital Media and Technology course? http://dmt.rrc.mb.ca/ From their website it looks fairly good and looks like you'll learn lots of stuff.

krisbfunk
11-23-2007, 10:32 PM
I was wondering what the educational options are when you already have a career path chosen, such as lighting, with good knowledge of shading, texturing and compositing. Coming from a lighting background in photography, I naturally wish to follow a similar path in 3D. I realize an understanding of rigging, modelling etc are essential.. but are there allowances/additional courses to specialize on something in any 3D oriented educational (Canadian) programs?

SenecaAnimation
11-26-2007, 07:45 PM
Hey Guys,


I'm the coordinator at Seneca for the Digital Animation Course. If you want some info about our school, I'll try to answer your questions as best I can.

Krisbfunk - I don't know what other schools offer, but we offer an all around course to teach you the basics from the ground up. Our first semester is a pretty heavy course load with classes in Modeling, Texturing and Lighting, Animation, Rigging, Cinematograpy (3D camera's), Acting, and LifeDrawing. The Second Semester has advanced classes in Texturing and Lighting, Rigging, LifeDrawing, and Animation. (the animation curriculum drops off after the first 2 weeks to allow student's to focus their efforts on whatevery they like during that supervised class for the remainder of the semester). You will also pick up some new courses including intro to MEL and Dynamics, Project Development (Portfolio prep) and Digital Tools (output programs like Fusion, Premiere etc).

We currently don't have an elective course, so you would have to take all of them, but you you would want to focus your time mainly on the Lighting and Texturing, Digital Tools, and Project Development courses. We don't make our students produce a short film, so you wouldn't be forced to waste time on that. (if you really want to make a short, then thats something we can talk about) We focus our efforts on you completing a successful demo reel.

If you have any more questions, you can post here, or contact me through the info in my signiature.

Sincerely,

m3tcy
11-29-2007, 05:23 AM
Could someone plz tell me How is Think Tank and Centennial College for 3D Modeling do they live upto their reputation?? what about Vanarts are they good for Modeling too??
I am basically looking out for an Animation course with prime focuse on modelling.

dmightyone
12-10-2007, 09:05 AM
hey metin, i'm from brazil and i'm currently studying at think tank as a modeller and all i can say is that the school is even more than i wished for! what makes the school so good is the fact of being small, with only 8 people per class, which means a lot of 1 on 1 time with the instructors. also the owners, scott and joe ( who are also great instructors) are most of the time there in the school, so if you need help with sth they'll be happy to help you. they're always making sure that they have the best instructors from the industry and the most update software in their workstations. you can ask anyone else who's studying there, the instructors and the alumni, they'll tell you the same thing. i recommend this school to anyone interested in 3d and is willing to work hard!

dmightyone
12-10-2007, 09:10 AM
hey metin, i'm from brazil and i'm currently studying at think tank as a modeller and all i can say is that the school is even more than i wished for! what makes the school so good is the fact of being small, with only 8 people per class, which means a lot of 1 on 1 time with the instructors. also the owners, scott and joe ( who are also great instructors) are most of the time there in the school, so if you need help with sth they'll be happy to help you. they're always making sure that they have the best instructors from the industry and the most update software in their workstations. you can ask anyone else who's studying there, the instructors and the alumni, they'll tell you the same thing. i recommend this school to anyone interested in 3d and is willing to work hard!

Apollo05
12-10-2007, 06:08 PM
Well

has anyone hear heard anything about the digital visual effects program at SHERIDAN COLLEGE???


im looking to get into the film industry and make special effects for movies.

im not much into character animation or traditional animation

-------------------
my experiences are:
BFA in Graphic Design
BFA in film studies

if sheridan is not the way to go...where do u recommend?? (i know ive thought about Sheridan for over 6 years now, and im about to graduate in 2 years at my university)

thanks to anyone who can help me insight on the digital vfx program at sheridan

Garduna_Knight
12-10-2007, 07:48 PM
Well

has anyone hear heard anything about the digital visual effects program at SHERIDAN COLLEGE???


im looking to get into the film industry and make special effects for movies.

im not much into character animation or traditional animation

-------------------
my experiences are:
BFA in Graphic Design
BFA in film studies

if sheridan is not the way to go...where do u recommend?? (i know ive thought about Sheridan for over 6 years now, and im about to graduate in 2 years at my university)

thanks to anyone who can help me insight on the digital vfx program at sheridan

DO NOT BOTHER GOING TO THEIR VFX PROGRAM. I was there for their Media arts program while a few of my friends from the year before me did a year at the post grad vfx program. all that is a 6 month speed through of AE and Combustion with a month to work on and make a demo reel at school.

From the studios that I've been to, Centennial College seems to get a lot of their students jobs within the first 3 months after their programs, I've met a bunch of em here and there. Seneca I'm not sure but lots of ppl from the studio that I'm at right now are from there.

Apollo05
12-11-2007, 04:44 AM
hmmm but thats not what thy told me when i went there for a visit.

im looking to go to sheridan for the general computer animation graduate school program and then leaping into the graduate digital visual effects.

DOES ANYONE KNOW ANYONE IN THE DIGITAL VISUAL EFFECTS PROGRAM??

bishtmahesh
06-09-2008, 10:15 AM
Hey EVERYONE..!!

I m working as a character animator in inidia and wants to apply wid sheridan collage for digital computer animation course..

can any one help me with this and wht kinda of reel I should make to get in sheridan and howz the collage...???


Cheers..

-MB

lebada
06-09-2008, 02:57 PM
i was at sheridan in art fundies for 1 yr and while i progressed a LOT there, i also discovered the school to be over-advertised. if you only accept the best, you'll clearly only have the best students PRIOR to them getting into the school

that said after that 1 yr and multiple encounters with year 3 students asking me how to model this or that in maya i chose not to apply there.

i've had friends who finished their degree and have no jobs so now they work construction instead and some others that are still there, are still learning 2D stuff which i personally find boring and slightly retarded after you work in 3D (not to take away from the art because some things are amazingly done)...so on a personal level, looking at it, avoiding sheridan is the best decision ive made in my life even though they do have an attractive program. (in 2d)

i believe they only have 20-30 spots for outsiders in their animation degree..15 i think were kept for internationals and 45 or something of that sort were kept for in-house students already at sheridan.

centennial or seneca can offer same thing, just not a degree and probably not as good a campus (which had decent prices for food and beer while i was there)

SenecaAnimation
06-09-2008, 10:36 PM
Hey All,

I thought I'd post some information about the Seneca College Digital Animation program. I had a prospective student email me a huge list of questions about the program, so I thought I should share the answers here to help anyone out there who is interested. Enjoy!


Q. My aim is primarily 3d modelling, though I also want a solid foundation in
3d animation. I am also looking for a program that provides a solid
foundation in the fundamentals of art. What program, if there is one at
your school,would be best for this?

A. Digital Animation would be the program that you are looking for. We cover
pretty much everything in the first semester with the exception of M.E.L
and Dynamics so you get a taste of everything. We offer a
modeling class in the first semester only, but allow you to focus your
demo reel during second semester on whatever aspect of the course you
like. You will also take a Life Drawing class during first and
second semester, which will help you train your eye for visual
art. Most people think of life drawing as making pretty pictures,
while in fact its main purpose it to help you "see".

Q. Who are your instructors? Who does, or have, the instructors worked for, in
what capacity? How long, what and where have they taught? Are there
any especially notable faculty?

A. All of our instructors currently work in the animation industry accross various studios in
Toronto. The studio's range from CORE Digital Pictures, Soho VFX,
Yowza, Hatch, Starz Animation, George Elliot Animation, and
Autodesk. (Those are the one's I can recall at the moment.)
Some of the Film work that I can name would be -The Incredible Hulk,
X-Men II, Silent Hill, Curios George, Shane Ackers9, The Chronicles or
Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,Midnight Club 3, Fantastic
4: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Blades of Glory, X-Men: the Last Stand,
Final Destination 3, Fantastic Four,FireHouse Dog. Our faculty
also have extensive experience in commercial, and television work. I
can assure you that you will work with some very talented
teachers. I teach the animation curriculum, and I am currently the
Animation Director for an Academy award winning director working on his new short here in Toronto. I can't name the film right now, but will be able to soon once our publicity agreement has been reached.

Q. Is it possible to speak with professors and program heads, to get a first
hand appraisal of the program and what it's best suited for?

A. You are currently speaking with the program head. This program lends itself extremely well to the film, television, and commercial industry, but is not limited to
only that. Many people end up freelancing with the skills they've
gained while being here. You can work in Visualization for
architecture, medical, or product design. You can work in the Motion Graphics
industry to make station identifications, lower thirds for television
programming or flying logos etc.

Q. What evidence do you have that graduates find success? Can you point out
successful graduates? Do you have statistics on how many students out of
the total number of students have been hired by what companies in
different years of your program? Are there any especially notable alumni?

A. This is a question that I get often, and its a good one to ask. Other than putting you in contact with our successful grads (which we can do), I don't have any other way of pointing out the successful ones. The question of percentage of successful grads is tricky. I can say that the rough percentage of each class that is hired into the animation industry is about 60 - 70 percent over the course of the first year out of school. This number will fluctuate with what is happening around town, and what kind of projects are coming into the city. The animation industry is fueled by projects, so the need for artists is based on when the companies have the work. Pretty much all of the work is contract. Full time positions are available, but usually go to senior staff who have contributed to the studio for a few years on contract. Sometimes there is a big need for employees when April comes, and sometimes not. I have seen almost entire classes hired, and on the flip side, entire classes waiting for months before anyone gets a job. What I say to individuals, is if you work smart, and work hard, you will be in a good place to find a job at the end of the school year. I make no guarantees that you will find work, but I can tell you that you will have all the necessary tools to go out and find a job.

Q. What international/industry recognition can you show? Are there articles about your school I should read, awards you've received, etc?

A. If you google "Ryan" and "Seneca" you'll find a whole bunch of articles that outline our participation in the Academy award winning animated short Ryan. Here is one link I found on the first page of google. http://www.studyincanada.com/english/news/pressrls.asp?ID=706&From=

Q. How long has the program been running?

A. This program used to be a four month program at an older Seneca campus I'm not sure how long is was running. We've been in our new location, with our revised curriculum for five years now.

Q. What type of equipment do students of your program and school have access to? What programs and what version of those programs? What other facilities? How many work stations per student, will there be enough to avoid my having to wait for equipment? Will I have my own work station and what would that include if so? Will I have 24/7 access to the facilities?

A. We are currently running Sun workstations. I don't have the stats in front of me right now, but they run dual processors, four gigs of ram, nVidia quadro cards and we run windows xp. They're pretty fast. All of our monitors are 20 inch lcd. Between each pair of workstations is a slave monitor, which shows what the teacher is doing up at the front on his/her computer. We also have a projector which also shows what the teacher is doing, so following along isn't a problem. We're running the latest version of Maya. Currently our group is working on 8.5, but we're upgrading to 2008 for the fall semester. (We make sure to not update to a new version mid semester because sometimes it can cause big problems) The classroom can accommodate twenty students, but our classes are usually around 12 - 15 students. In the fall, you will have the station to yourself. We also have an intake in January, so we bring in another group of students so we do share the workstations for second semester, but I have not seen students waiting to have a computer free based on the numbers we actually let in. The facility is 24/7 with the exception of a week or two during the Christmas break, and stat holidays like the easter Monday.

Q. How is time balanced between art foundations and 3d modeling and animation?
Howis the teaching of art foundations handled? What areas are covered, andto what depth? Are other, non art/3d related classes required? If so,how is this handled?

A. We don't have separate classes for teaching the art foundations. We expect that you will have a solid understanding of the basics, which you will show in the portfolio that you submit for consideration into the program.

Q. What is the location of your school, and more specifically, the location in which the program I would be attending? Does your school offer any assistance in find ingliving accommodations? Is on campus accommodation available?

A. We are located in the Seneca@York campus which is up at York University on Keele, between Finch and Steeles. Our mailing address is 88 The Pond Rd. Toronto On. M3J 3M6. There is a Seneca housing website at https://yourfuture.senecacollege.ca/services/housing/index.ezc;jsessionid=8883616723DB2B35592D5DD8EAF1BEC0

Q. I plan on focusing solely on school while in the program, and strongly prefer not to have to work while in the program. Does the school provide services to help me find loans?

A. We also prefer that you do not have a job while you study Digital Animation. You can take a look at http://www.senecac.on.ca/registrar/financialaid/ to see if you qualify for Grants or Bursaries.

Q. What scholarships or bursaries are available for this program? Does the school provide any support in finding financial support for me?

A. See answer above.

Q. How long is the course? How many 'credit hours', weeks, years, etc? Why is your program that length?

A. The course is 8 months. It runs from the first week of September, until the third week of April. Our program is that length for a couple of reasons. The first is that by the end of 8 months, you should be able to continue your learning on your own. (You will never stop learning in this field) The second is that anything longer would be more than is needed.

Q. What periods of study are available?

A. September - April, and January - August.

Q. What do I graduate with?

A. Certificate.

Q. Does the program offer a co-op program? What contacts within the industry do you have? What other help with finding a job does the school supply?

A. We do not offer a co-op program. Once again, the industry you will be training for is very contract driven, so setting up a co-op with a studio isn't easy. We have many great contacts in the industry, through our staff who work in the studios, and our grads who continue to work. We will have a few studio's over the course of the year come in and talk to our prospective grads about the work they do, the up coming opportunities and what they are looking for in an employee.

Q. Does your school work or cooperate with particular companies in regards to the program in any way? What companies and how?

A. Each year we have an advisory committee meeting, which consists of studio reps coming together to discuss what we've done over the year, and what we want to do in the following year. They advise us on changes we wish to make, and they also suggest changes that they think will benefit our students. We currently have 12 students working on a short film that I can't name publicly yet. This is not something that we expect will happen every year, but we have had a number of productions come through the school over the last couple of years that give our students the opportunity of working on.

Q. How does the program help me create my portfolio?

A. The whole point of our program is the demo reel. We don't make films here during the course, because it is way too much work to try and make a film, while learning the art and the software. Our curriculum is designed to help you create your demo at the end of the year. The digital tools class is all about compositing and reel construction. Portfolio and Presentation focuses on resume and cover letter writing, interview skills, networking etc. It is a really great class, one I wish I had when I was in school.


Q. How would I find out if any of my course credits from University of Manitoba and Red River College are transferable?

A. You can contact the registration office at http://www.senecac.on.ca/registrar/index.html

Q. What benefits will I have as an alumni?

A. You can check out the Alumni site here: http://www.senecaalumni.ca/

Q. What is the cost of the programs you would suggest for me, are there extra costs I would be expected to pay? If there are extra costs outside of the tuition, how much would those be?

A. The course tuition is $9937.58, and we have a $200 life drawing fee (covers all the model costs for the year, and include extra life drawing every night mon-fri) You will need newsprint and conte/charcoal for the drawing class, which should run no more than $100 for the year. I recommend that you have a portable hard drive, which should cost no more than $100 - $200 dollars. You will also want dvd's to back up your work.

Sincerely,

Sean Craig.

peterssharp
06-23-2008, 08:23 PM
Hi, guys..I've already asked this question on another thread, but I think that this is the correct place to ask it. I'm living in Montreal and the only evening course that I could find is a course at Concordia University - Computer Animation Maya. This course has five modules:

- Animation Basics
- Maya Basics
- Maya Level 1 / Advanced Techniques
- Maya Level 2 / Advanced Rendering
- Maya Level 3 / Creating your portfolio

Here is the link for the program:
http://sarno.concordia.ca/conted/de...ute&DeptCode=CI (http://sarno.concordia.ca/conted/departments/department.aspx?DeptName=Computer%20Institute&DeptCode=CI)

Few questions:
- Does anyone knows if this is a good course? Any pros x cons?
- Do you think that this seems to be a complete course in 3d animation that after finishing it will allow me to start thinking about a career in CG or I'll need more courses somewhere else?


Thank you very much for the attention.

[Peter]

peterssharp
08-25-2008, 07:51 PM
Nobody ever heard anything about this course at Concordia? The deadline to apply is getting closer and I still don't know if this course is good or not..

Thanks in advance.

[]s
Peter

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