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thefarside
01-30-2004, 06:25 PM
Hi

I have a question...

I've been teaching my self blender for half a year, and i've got the modeling mostly down, but i'm having trouble with materialing.

I would like to material it in photoshop or something similar, as i cant seem to do what i would really like to do in blender itself. the model is way to compliticated to just import a photoshop image of the material i want. Its a mech warrior, so i would like to add bolts, scratchs, battle dammage,ect.

I've heard that you can export a flat image of the wire frame of the model (texture map??), which would be perfect, but i cant seem to get it to work, and i've tried alot of tutorials on the matter.

If anyone could tell me how to material it, or maybe just point me towards a really good tutorial, that would be great!

Thanks for any help.

Apollux
01-30-2004, 10:58 PM
For what you want, 2 things are needed:
1.- A layered texture (some people would call it "shader"). Here you create the battle damage and tiny details.

2.- UV mapping for that layered texture. Here you apply the layered texture on the model.

Seek for tutorials on both subjects, there are many of them.

Even though I named then 1 and 2, in reality, you need to UV map the model FIRST and THEN you paint your layered texture based on the UV mapping that you created for the model.

JamesMK
01-30-2004, 11:18 PM
Hot tip: when it comes to laying out the UV's, you can always export your model to .OBJ (there's a script somewhere for that), load it into Wings3D (free, open source) and use its excellent unwrapping features - then import back into Blender for further rendering and so on. Unwrapping complex models in Blender is admittedly rather painful. Also search for the free version of an application called LithUnwrap - a very helpful tool for further editing of the unwrapped UV's (handles OBJ in and out as well).

thefarside
01-31-2004, 02:06 AM
Thanks for the Tips,

However i have been unable to find any good tutorials, that really explain how to work the UV Map. They all kinda assume things that i dont know, or skip steps that i really need to know, so perhaps if anyone knew one that was really good, would they mind posting it.

Thanks

fligh
01-31-2004, 03:07 PM
http://membres.lycos.fr/bobois/Tuts/uvmapping/uvmapping01.html

http://www.elysiun.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19378

http://www.elysiun.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18871&highlight=uvmapping

http://www.elysiun.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=19378&highlight=tutorial

JA-forreal
02-09-2004, 03:36 AM
Originally posted by JamesMK
Hot tip: when it comes to laying out the UV's, you can always export your model to .OBJ (there's a script somewhere for that), load it into Wings3D (free, open source) and use its excellent unwrapping features - then import back into Blender for further rendering and so on. Unwrapping complex models in Blender is admittedly rather painful. Also search for the free version of an application called LithUnwrap - a very helpful tool for further editing of the unwrapped UV's (handles OBJ in and out as well).

That is a great tip JamesMK.

But I would also suggest that you try to learn some of the new Blender modeling features. You can import and export simple models into Blender without any problems. I have had problems with importing some highly complex models into Blender from Wings. This may change as soon as we get better OBJ import and export support for Blender. But for now I would suggest that you model as much of the work as you can in Blender so you can keep things in line with the Blender software system setup structure. This way you can avoid some vertex face normal issues etc. that my come up upon importing objects from other apps.

This principle applies to most 3d apps. Stay in your main 3d app for modeling as much as possible.

You will find that UV mapping in Blender can be easier if you first build all of the main basic simple shapes of your model. Then you can map that extremely low poly version. Any other geometry that you slice out of this mesh model will be updated on your UV map as you model. Then all you have to do is tweak the uv points later. This is the best way to UV map in Blender. All of your other UV mapping headaches will then be due to your 2d/3d painting software not Blender.

If you learn the best way to work with UV's in Blender you will not need to use LithUnwrap or anything else.

Have fun!

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