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View Full Version : Burton's Rotting "Corpse"


RobertoOrtiz
01-15-2004, 01:55 PM
Quote:
"Director Tim Burton recently spoke with CNN on how "The Corpse Bride", his second foray into the stop motion animation feature world after the much beloved "Nightmare Before Christmas", is progressing.

First up he was asked why he won't make a direct sequel to "The Nightmare Before Christmas", to which he glibbly responded - "What would it be ... 'Thanksgiving World'? Or they go kidnap Uncle Sam on the Fourth of July? That wouldn't go over too good these days".

"The Corpse Bride" which he's producing and made in the same animation style as "The Nightmare Before Christmas", is based on an Eastern European folk tale about a man who mistakenly weds a dead body. "

>>link<< (http://www.darkhorizons.com/news04/040114f.php)
-R

MaDSheeP
01-15-2004, 02:34 PM
I just saw his first film Vincent last night, that was awesome =)

RockinAkin
01-15-2004, 05:14 PM
Wow - Never knew he was making another stop-motion animated film.
Cant wait to see it!

elektronaut
01-15-2004, 05:42 PM
these are good news!!!! love his guy!

Gregwid
01-15-2004, 05:57 PM
Great news.I had no idea.I really look forward to this new movie.I was wondering when he would go back to his roots and recreate some of what made him big to begin with.Thanks for the news and link RobertoOrtiz. :beer: :beer:

midknight3
01-15-2004, 06:13 PM
I'm looking foward to it as well. I saw Big Fish last night, and his vision is like no other.

I thought he was working on a new Willy Wonka though?

beaker
01-15-2004, 08:22 PM
Originally posted by midknight3
I'm looking foward to it as well. I saw Big Fish last night, and his vision is like no other.

I thought he was working on a new Willy Wonka though?
Just like Nightmare Before Christmas, he is writing the story and producing it, not directing it. Henry Selick directed Nightmare and Mike Johnson is directing Corpse Bride(he was director of the stop motion tv series the PJ's). Willy Wonka is still the next movie Burton is directing.

Slurry
01-15-2004, 11:09 PM
Second foray...?

Wasn't Burton involved with James and the Giant Peach as well?

countZero
01-16-2004, 04:15 AM
Originally posted by Slurry
Second foray...?

Wasn't Burton involved with James and the Giant Peach as well?

No but both 'Nightmare' and 'James & the Giant Peach' had the same director; Henry Sellick.

MaDSheeP
01-16-2004, 04:49 AM
i'm not sure about james and the giant peach, probably, he was working on The Black Couldron when he did Vincent

beaker
01-16-2004, 05:45 AM
Originally posted by Slurry
Second foray...?

Wasn't Burton involved with James and the Giant Peach as well?
Yea, they must have forgotten about that one. He was producer on it. I guess they only want to remember his successfull ones.

Madhat
02-04-2005, 03:52 PM
Up until about 30 seconds ago I was convinced it was 3D. Although I have read a dozen articles saying it's not, there is a small part of me that still cannot (refuses?) to believe it's stop motion. I am slowly being converted though.:)

There has to be some 3D elements.....dosn't there?

Stop motion or 3D, it looks great, I will be seeing it for sure.

gruvsyco
02-04-2005, 06:59 PM
No but both 'Nightmare' and 'James & the Giant Peach' had the same director; Henry Sellick.

Who as word has it is working on a Stop-Mo version of Neil Gaiman's Coraline

TRi-14
02-04-2005, 07:20 PM
For those of you who didn’t get a chance to see the trailer: http://www.apple.com/trailers/wb/corpse_bride/

-chris

nuclearfessel
02-04-2005, 08:47 PM
Just like Nightmare Before Christmas, he is writing the story and producing it, not directing it. Henry Selick directed Nightmare and Mike Johnson is directing Corpse Bride(he was director of the stop motion tv series the PJ's). Willy Wonka is still the next movie Burton is directing.

actually he IS... but he's sharing directing with Mike Johnson who's directed the PJ's

manacrystal
02-04-2005, 08:57 PM
Everyone watch the trailer, this movie looks awesome. I'm a huge Burton fan and I can't wait!!

pogonip
02-04-2005, 09:01 PM
It does not look as enchanting as Nightmare ( My favorite animated film ever ) but it does look good . One of the best things about Nightmare was it's songs and muscical score I hope to see some of that in this movie !

DorkmanScott
02-04-2005, 10:17 PM
With Wonka done shooting and in post-production, he's probably able to split his attention just a bit. Frankly I'm surprised that he was able to get as much animation done as he has in the time that it's been "shooting."

M. Scott

Sovereign
02-05-2005, 02:47 PM
wow.. I like Tim Burton style. This movie look like very good animation. I like this claymotion technique.

stewartjones
02-05-2005, 03:01 PM
It does not look as enchanting as Nightmare ( My favorite animated film ever ) but it does look good . One of the best things about Nightmare was it's songs and muscical score I hope to see some of that in this movie !

Nightmare is my fave movie of all time!

I agree, it doesn't look as enchanting, but the style is so close to Nightmare that it is on the top of my list of films to see! :bounce: :bounce:

L.Rawlins
02-05-2005, 07:10 PM
I thought this one had been done in 3D but made to look and feel like it was stop motion.

Bentagon
02-05-2005, 10:34 PM
Nope. Stop-motion all the way. In the other thread, an animator on this movie said that the only computer effects were the lightbeams behind the corpse rising, and the WB sign in the beginning.

- Bentagon

WhiteRabbitObj
02-06-2005, 03:48 AM
I knew this was stop-motion but when I saw the trailer I couldn't believe my eyes and had to stop it in the middle, check out google to make sure it was stop-motion, and then watch the trailer from the beginning again. It truly is amazing stop-motion. I've never seen such consistent lighting and smooth motion, or perfect-looking puppets in any stop-motion to date. I'd say the craft has really come a long way recently, and I wonder what has brought that about, since (though there will be those who take issue with this comment) it's a nearly dead art. Can't wait to see it.

dilipale
02-06-2005, 11:26 AM
Ok I'll bite.

Stop motion a dead art!

I think something can only be declared dead when A) no one is practicing the "art" anymore, and B) no one can remember how the said "art" was achieved.
Stop motion is still very much alive and kicking here in the UK, and doesn't look like dying out anytime soon.
Lets remember that stop motion is practically as old as cinema itself. I wonder if CG animation will still be around in 90 to 100 years time? Or rather, will there still be a need for such a thing as a CG animator in the future. If the art of stop motion animation is still being practiced in another 100 years from now, there will still be humans involved in the process. As for how smooth it would look....Who cares!

Hugh
02-06-2005, 02:07 PM
There are at least two major feature films being made in the UK as stop-motion animated films at the moment...

The Corpse Bride, and Wallace and Gromit and the Curse of the Wererabbit (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0312004/) - I don't really know the studio doing The Corpse Bride, but Aardman are still very much a stop-motion animation studio.

Are they any US studios that are doing stop-motion, or is it really only happening over here these days?

WhiteRabbitObj
02-06-2005, 02:59 PM
I don't know of any studios in the U.S. working on stop-motion features. I knew about the two in production (Corpse and W&G) but that's an awful lot of stop-motion films considering the normal amount. I say "nearly dead art" because it's slowly dwindling, but kept alive by the occasional feature, commercials, and especially the practioners. I have a friend who is specializing in stop-motion at school, actually. But it's not seen very often and the applications are slim these days, except for fully stop-motion features and such. Puppets for visual effects seems to have gone the way of the dinosaur... as Phil Tippet so accutely stated while working in Jurassic Park. I don't really see what stop-motion being around since the beginning of cinema has to do with anything though. So has optical printing, and no one optical prints anymore except people who make bad "experimental films". Digital is the way of the now (and the forseeable future), for better or worse. Things come and go as they're replaced by something better, as CG has done for stop-motion. Perhaps something will replace CG down the road, I can't imagine what, but then, I'll bet Harryhausen never could have imagined CG either. Who knows! I'm glad that stop-motion isn't completely dead and continues to be revitalized every few years, but I don't see it making any sort of widespread comeback.

teabgs
02-06-2005, 10:05 PM
I don't really see what stop-motion being around since the beginning of cinema has to do with anything though. So has optical printing, and no one optical prints anymore except people who make bad "experimental films". Digital is the way of the now (and the forseeable future), for better or worse. Things come and go as they're replaced by something better, as CG has done for stop-motion. Perhaps something will replace CG down the road, I can't imagine what, but then, I'll bet Harryhausen never could have imagined CG either. Who knows! I'm glad that stop-motion isn't completely dead and continues to be revitalized every few years, but I don't see it making any sort of widespread comeback.

ok, now I'll bite.

How is CG 'better' than stop motion? Maybe for realistic special effects, but that's it.
Which is better: Picasso or Carrivaggio?

You cannot compare them in terms of one being better...it is ART. They're different and both good depending on what you want and your personal style.

WhiteRabbitObj
02-07-2005, 04:54 AM
Understand that I think and speak only in commercial terms. Stop-motion's commercial applications are inferior to CG... generally both in quality of motion (if not art design), cost, and time. This really isn't debatable, if CG was not superior to stop-motion in almost every regard when it comes to commercial applications (visual effects of any sort), then stop-motion wouldn't no longer be widely used in effects.

Debating the artistic standpoints is a pointless excercise, certainly. I really like stop-motion, and I do not claim it is any less of an art than CG. I am wholeheartedly glad that the art is still alive, if not widespread, because it would be a shame if it indeed died entirely. It is similar to wood and stone carving. These arts are not dead, but they are very limitedly practiced these days, whereas a couple thousand years ago, many artisans existed which created amazing sculptures and temples and such, the art of which has nearly been lost today. I speak of this example specifically since I happened to discuss it at lunch today. :thumbsup:

XEngineer
02-07-2005, 08:51 PM
actually he IS... but he's sharing directing with Mike Johnson who's directed the PJ's


I heard that Mike Johnson basically directed it, but that the studio wanted Tim Burton's name on the directing credits. So now they've officially co-directed Corpse Bride.

BillB
02-08-2005, 01:30 AM
It does not look as enchanting as Nightmare ( My favorite animated film ever ) but it does look good . One of the best things about Nightmare was it's songs and muscical score I hope to see some of that in this movie !

Well, music is being again done by Danny Elfman, so fingers crossed :bounce:

Was blown away when I discovered Elfman was the singing voice of Jack Skellington - what a talent!

LW_Will
02-08-2005, 01:48 AM
I thought this one had been done in 3D but made to look and feel like it was stop motion.

Wasn't it about hmmm... 7 or 8 years ago that people were saying that cgi was NOT an artform and stop motion was? :)

Look... animatioin is animation. If you do it with pencils, markers, pupets, computers or moving screws and washers... its all animation. No form is "better" than any other.

Now go, and do good works...

BillB
02-08-2005, 02:07 AM
Wasn't it about hmmm... 7 or 8 years ago that people were saying that cgi was NOT an artform and stop motion was?

Fools! This time we're right!

:buttrock: CG 4 EVA :buttrock:

Dutchman
02-08-2005, 06:08 PM
I'm really much looking forward to this! The trailer looks só amazing and great animated! Especially because Depp ánd Burton ánd Elfman made this film...! It's gonna be one big party! :)

Two days ago I watched Nightmare before Xmas for the very first time, and I must say it is such an incredibly amazingly cooooool movie! (before I had watched the trailer of it numorous times; it is here on the VHS of 'The Lion King', as an ad... sometimes when I was young I rewinded that VHS 10 times to just watch that trailer :) :bounce: )

Also Vincent is an amazing movie, as Frankenweenie is (both on that cool DVD of Nightmare)... Especially interesting how much elements of Frankenweenie come back in Edward Scissorhands! :)

BURTON (and his crew ;) , especially that one at Vinton Animation Studios ;) ) ) RULE MY WORLD! :)

SamChen
02-09-2005, 06:18 AM
I do look forward to this. "Nightmare Before Christmas" is one of the greatest animation achievements ever.. and it was damn entertaining too. I'm delighted to see the Burton/Elfman collaboration again.

Since most of the posts in this thread are glowing, let me bring up a nit-picky point and perhaps start a discussion. The first thing I noticed about the animation was how fluid it was for stop-motion... it's no wonder many thought this was CG. However, I did notice that the facial expressions of the human characters were pretty "static" (for lack of a better word). They all seem to have the same expression. The eyes and eyebrow areas weren't animated much... resulting in less expressive and emotive faces. If you remember Jack Skellington, his face was extremely expressive, with exaggerated sneers and deeply expressive eyebrows. I fear that these humans will suffer a little of what plagued "The Polar Express." Anyone else feel similarly?

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