PDA

View Full Version : concept art (3 pics)


yatl
01-14-2004, 06:19 PM
Hi!

I have been self-teaching design since the fall 2002 beside my full-time job, learning most of my tools from scratch (I previously knew only Photoimpact, which is not a so bad program, even when compared to Photoshop). I will certainly need a bit more time to grant more experience and produce art at a professional level, but I'd like to have your comments about my current artwork.

Thanks for visiting my newborn site at http://yatl.net for more details, drawings and comments! :)

I hope you won't mind if there are still some english errors; I'm french and hardly ever write texts to be seen by others (I mean in english).

Two pics for you, from my current collection :) (made in may and june 2003 respectively):



http://yatl.net/data/monkreduced.jpg

http://yatl.net/data/town1reduced.jpg

As the two above are made with markers (TRIA), I'll put this one two, painted with Photoshop 7:

http://yatl.net/data/paysage2end.jpg

See you!

Yatl. (http://yatl.net/)

Torquesmacky
01-14-2004, 10:29 PM
Nice work. I especially like the village one. My only crits would be that your character looks a little flat, also a bit more contrast in objects that are closer to the viewer would help give a better sense of depth.

BMunchausen
01-15-2004, 09:22 PM
Hey there!
Nice site and nice work overall. I like the crazy, detailed landscape stuff. One thing about the character designs - generally it seems like for those, you need to show the entire character, instead of cutting them off at the thighs or knees. It helps define the pose if you can see how the weight is distributed.

On that note - I think the poses are a little static. There's generally a couple of ways to go with character designs - totally neutral poses done from front, side and back, to show the details of the character for a 3D modeler's benefit, or in a dynamic action pose that gives some idea of the sort of character it is. I think right now the poses on the figures are too much the same on both sides - you could change that by shifting the weight to one side or the other - and making the arms do different things more obviously.

Just a thought - really nice work though - and good luck in your pursuit of the game industry job!

yatl
01-16-2004, 11:38 AM
Thx for ur comments!

Now that I'm trying to learn 3DSmax, I recognize that I should draw the whole character to make the 3D creation easier.

You are right when you point out the lack of "dynamism" of my characters. Till the end of 2002, I'd stopped drawing for more than 8 years, and I must keep on the efforts to improve quickly now. In a few months, I think I will be able to draw with a more lifefull style.

I've tried to see if I can get a job in videogames as a 2D-only artist, but it seems very hard. Even for 2D-oriented vacancies, they tend to ask for Maya or 3DSmax secondary skills -- and I am a real newbie in 3D world (only 2 weeks of maya learning and a few days of 3DSmax -- I prefer this last). Do you think every new artist in videogames should know at least the bases of 3D's most important programs?

Au revoir!

Yatl. (http://yatl.net/)

BMunchausen
01-16-2004, 05:04 PM
Well actually it's funny you should ask that - I know for a fact that you should - at least that's true where I am. That's sort of a trend now. They're expecting artists to do more and more, instead of just handling one thing, like texturing. I work at a game company now and the 2D/Concept artists MUST know at least the basics of 3D. They expect you to know it already if you're applying for a job, and they're making all the existing 2D artists learn it.

I'm in the same boat you are...trying to move into the art dept, and I'm a traditional artist. I'm having to learn how to paint in Photoshop, as well as learn Maya. It's a lot to absorb all at once! :)
I for one, think your chances of getting a job will be greatly improved by having some 3D under your belt. Here, they suggested you have in your portfolio, maybe one nice scene - like an interior, with a nice variety of sculpted and textured objects, with good (or at least competent) lighting.

Hope that helps!

Raenz
01-16-2004, 08:03 PM
BM is right, I too work in the game industry and any artist we interview has to be a tad bit familiar in regards to mediums. 2D artist need to know at least the basics of 3D as it helps in the design process...knowing what is possible in 3d with limited triangles.

You have an edge though, you can do traditional styles, 3d learning becomes more technical if you have the 2d skills to start with. *Note: that's just my opinion*

BMunchausen
01-16-2004, 11:43 PM
Er....Armored Saint - did you HAVE to call me BM? That's a little too close to "bowel movement" for my liking.
:D

yatl
01-17-2004, 07:47 AM
Thanks for your advice!

I feel ashamed of asking such a question about 3D which answer seems to be so obvious for you. I've been so far away from art and computer for years... I guess situation has changed faster than the way I think and work :)

So, let's go back to the hardwork -- on 3DSMax and Cie :)

Bye to all, see you soon with 3D stuff from Yatl's corner :)

Yatl (http://yatl.net/)

BMunchausen
01-18-2004, 01:45 AM
No need to be ashamed about it my friend! :)

How would you really know what's required if you don't already work for a game company? Anyway, each development house's needs are different, but I think the overall need for 2D artists to know 3D is at least partially a result of the economy - companies need fewer people to be able to do more work, in order to save money.

I look forward to seeing your 3D work...

yatl
01-18-2004, 06:44 AM
Thanks Baron!

I'll try to do my best -- and reach my aim :)
This whole thread has been so useful for me... It will be a pleasure to share a view of my 3d-work in progress :)

C u all!

Yatl.

CGTalk Moderation
01-17-2006, 05:00 AM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.