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View Full Version : Blade Runner City FOR REAL: Tokyo's Sky City!


RobertoOrtiz
01-12-2004, 12:29 AM
This is a proposal from some japanese architects to change the approach to urban crowding. Vertical hypercities TWICE the height of today's tallest skycraper that would house and employ thousands of people...


Check it out!
>>Link<< (http://dsc.discovery.com/convergence/engineering/skycity/interactive/interactive.html)

-R

erilaz
01-12-2004, 12:57 AM
That is freakin' amazing. I really hope they do it.:D

PhilOsirus
01-12-2004, 12:58 AM
I saw a documentary on it a while ago. Seemed interesting and quite feasible. My only grip is that they should start at much smaller scale now. This should start at a merging of residential and commercial zones, where instead of having kilometers of long stretches of 2 stories to 3 stories high houses, you have one block that contains 3 sections, 1 residential, 1 commercial and a smaller one for public services such as small medical facilities, security departments, 2 schools (primary and secondary schooling). All 3 zones would be monitored and managed with ease thanks to computers' large help in automatic referencing, which would help in emergencies and referral for citizen's needs. The residences are identical in concepts, walls can be removed with a system of "grips" (think the kind of grips used on some chests for exemple) without the need of using one screwdriver. This would enable one to modify the size of each rooms dependind on his or his familly's needs and give access to the pipes and other places that might need reparation without destroying any walls. Houses themselves only varry in size and are allocated based on size of famillies. Commerces are heavily centralized as well in a mall-like manner (but on a much smaller scale).

This would free a lot of space in the cities themselves that are taken by long stretches of houses and poorly managed commerces (that constantly close only to see other such poorly managed commerces take over repeating an endless cycle of commercial stagnation), centralize all aspects of a citizen's need, reduce unneeded traffic, increase response time for emergency interventions, augment the ease of waste control and recycling, among other benefits.

Yeah, I find it a lot of much fun to think of how to build the future:)

boboroshi
01-12-2004, 01:07 AM
Can they send these guys to the US and have them fix the stupidity that is urban sprawl? oy.

pogonip
01-12-2004, 03:21 AM
I for one would love to have a big house with a big yard and tree's...etc etc that would justify my years of hard work and be a place my family can always call home and have good memories . Like when I was a kid . I really doubt anybody growing up or living in mega apartment complex would be able to say the same . If something like this was introdiced in America and had the chance of destroying neighborhoods where people have grown up,lived and died...I would be the first in line to vote against it . Sorry I really dont want mine or my childrens future to be Corusant ...

Slurry
01-12-2004, 03:34 AM
Let me know when the hovercars are in.
Make mine candyapple red.

t-man152
01-12-2004, 03:51 AM
they should make these in places where obesity is a problem the more fat you have the higher up you live ( ohh and they should forget to put elevators should take care of overpopulation and obesity, of course the number of heart atacks would increase but then we could have emergency aspirine kit at evey floor. lol

boboroshi
01-12-2004, 04:15 AM
Originally posted by pogonip
I for one would love to have a big house with a big yard and tree's...etc etc that would justify my years of hard work and be a place my family can always call home and have good memories . Like when I was a kid . I really doubt anybody growing up or living in mega apartment complex would be able to say the same . If something like this was introdiced in America and had the chance of destroying neighborhoods where people have grown up,lived and died...I would be the first in line to vote against it . Sorry I really dont want mine or my childrens future to be Corusant ...

I'm all for good urban and non-urban desing, but strip malls? modern suburban development in the us is a farce. it's a traffic hell where people drive their cars to their driveway, into the garage (which is the largest part of the house facing the street) and then don't talk to their neighbors.

on the other hand, they're chargeinf $450,000 for a 1 bedroom CONDO here in northern virginia.

It's all a crock.

heavyness
01-12-2004, 04:38 AM
pogonip,

if anything, this would help you. if we can cram more people downtown, that would leave more open suburb and rural land for people to build houses and neighborhoods. many people live there whole lives in an apartment/condo without a lawn or tree to care for and love it. if we organize better, everyone wins.

PhilOsirus
01-12-2004, 05:32 AM
I agree with kole. This isn't meant to send everyone in little honeycomb-shaped houses that all have the same tapestry. It's about fixing the problem facing large residential zones that are extremely badly managed, disorganized, etc. All of this leads to bad economical situations for its inhabitants and the small commerces in them. Times change, and models must change according to changing times.

I really doubt anybody growing up or living in mega apartment complex would be able to say the same .

Well then you are implying that people living in large apartment complexes somehow have less of a childhood than others. I live at the top of a 5 story high appartment complex of 40-something appartments. No I can't go and pick apples from the apple tree in my backyard, nor swim in my backyard's swimming pool, nor make a snowman in my backyard. But this is both the price to pay for a good organization of residential areas and if taken further like in the article mentioned above (or on smaller scales) would be extremely beneficial to a city as a whole and to the environment. And at the same time my "memories" are simply based on other events, it is far from isolationism! As a matter of fact I would say most "house with garage and backyard pool" suffer from such isolationism, as no one speaks to each other, and really, all houses are the same in such cases too, they are just bigger and "prettier".

If by creating such neo-city complexes we can enjoy our environments for more years to come, I'll give up on my "backyard tree" and trade it for whole forest and clean beaches!:)

Anyway I also remember hearing about Hayao Miyazaki being involved in such a project for sea-city building not long ago. I really hope these projects come to fruitition soon. It takes great minds to put these projects in place!

quid
01-12-2004, 07:33 AM
It would be a logistical nightmare to have to evacuate such a building should disaster occur.

And will somebody please help them out with that awful looking design. I don’t know about you, but I think they would have to spike the water supply in that building with Prozac or something… it would be a pretty depressing existence having to call a place like that home--all concrete and ugly.

parallax
01-12-2004, 08:00 AM
Whats this, off-shore living?
Drilling for oil in the comfort of your apartment?
I'm all for more efficiency, but i've seen much better designs for vertical cities, even the pyramid thing (i believe mile high city or some other) is a better design.

mattregnier
01-12-2004, 01:46 PM
Mega-Tokyo is emerging :)

Meet George Jetson...

kwshipman
01-12-2004, 03:17 PM
I would probably live in that for a while, untill I started haveing a family then I would want the house on a large piece of land with the white picket fence etc. But that is primarily a western way of thinking.

I could see this for Tokoyo or other majorly crouded cities. I would be cool if they cleared out the ground underneith this thing and made it into a huge park with trees and such.

Another strange thing to think about is given the height of this thing, the ground floors and the top floors would have compleatly different climates.:surprised

does anyone have any more links with more information?

Neil
01-12-2004, 04:05 PM
How about we just stop breeding like animals?

I can't have this baby, i'm only 15 years old! Who wants it? Next year, OMG i got another baby, good thing i can just give it up again. Next year, jeez, it happened again, ok, who wants it this time? etc..

PhilWesson
01-12-2004, 04:39 PM
I'm hearing all these complaints about how people want to have their white picket fence, apple tree, garage, etc. But think about where this may be taking place. Japan is already very crowded. Have you seen where a good deal of the Japanese are living now? There aren't many 'white picket fence/apple tree' places in or near major cities at the moment. While i'm not saying that cookie cutter apartments are a good thing, but I don't see this as being the case.

TapioKa
01-12-2004, 04:46 PM
1. Japan's population is on the decline, I think the first country in the developed world. I highly doubt that this would get built.

2. If anyone has been to Tokyo and seen it at night, it already looks like Bladrunner, minus the flying cars ans floating blimps.
The scale might be slightly smaller in height, but not by much in many places.

Regardless, they do seem interested in feats of extreme scale and engineering. The technological advances that they accomplish will translate to smaller projects.

quid
01-12-2004, 04:58 PM
Neil has the right idea. Mega stupid buildings would not be needed if we stopped breeding like rabbits. People were never meant to live in such dense situations—enter contagious disease please. I don’t want to go too far into the relationship between population density and disease, but here is a brief summary: many diseases mutate rapidly and form new strains of disease, when population density is small (we’re not stacked mile high but rather miles apart), these diseases cannot afford to kill their host as this would be suicide to the disease as it does not have the time needed to spread and thus any disease that mutates into host-killing stains die off fast. However if population is dense the host becomes more expendable as the disease can move fast from one host to the next, so should a disease mutate into some nasty rapid host killer it can easily survive in hyper-dense situations and before you know it becomes pandemic. People think AIDS is bad, if population keeps on going in the direction it is, we haven’t seen nothing yet. We’re DOOOMED!:thumbsup:
And above all those towers are ugly!

ElectroLux
01-12-2004, 06:08 PM
Originally posted by TapioKa
1. Japan's population is on the decline, I think the first country in the developed world. I highly doubt that this would get built.


Population is on the decline in many northern european coutries like Finland. This is not a bad thing per se, but it does create lot of problems, since whole economy is based on infinite growth.

There's lot of free space in Japan, but unfortunately many young people leave rural areas after school and move to big cities.

Personally I love huge buildings, no matter if they are ancent and new. Oddly enough, I hate huge cities... But I think I could love building, that is huge city.

halo
01-12-2004, 06:09 PM
imagine the base jump off that :D:D:D:bounce:

PhilOsirus
01-12-2004, 06:31 PM
Mega stupid buildings would not be needed if we stopped breeding like rabbits. People were never meant to live in such dense situations—enter contagious disease please.

Except it is extremely unlikely that we will be forced to have only 1 kid per familly any time soon, it would also be quite unacceptable ethic-wise. It is much more appropriate to revise our city-building model. The vast majority of today's cities are based on centuries old models, following even the same routes, with only vague organization of zones and services. No guidelines are being followed, no standar. Every street corner ends up as a case-per-case problem of management, needing constant retouches as situations become unbalanced (such as traffic, pollution, etc). We must treat city-building in the same way we make computers and in the same way nature's system of evolution works: conservation of energy, constant greater speed of action, and organization of resources. Any other system is bound to fail because the laws of evolution are failproof.

jStins
01-12-2004, 09:41 PM
I'm all for forward thinking projects like this. I agree that high density housing like this is our only hope to perserve the environment (aside from space colonization) for the long term.

I live in the most densly populated part of Seattle and I love it. I grew up in the suburbs and I have a much stronger sense of community here than I ever did growing up. In many ways I think the 'white picket fence' way of life is far more isolated.

-Joel

PS- first post w00t!:buttrock:

Supervlieg
01-12-2004, 10:14 PM
I'd like to see it happening. The overpopulation matter is another discussion altogether. The Japanese need the space. And it would definitaly be cool in a weird sci-fi sort of way.

Layer01
01-12-2004, 11:13 PM
well all we need now is some giant mech's a psychotic kid and some shady government organisations and we will have a real life anime on our hands.....now THATS reality TV i would watch :p

minus
01-13-2004, 03:00 AM
I don't understand why they went with such a flexing design. I mean.. your first implementation of a huge project like this I don't think it warrents having a suspended Stadium... with a huge suspended centerpiece. I say they make it largly 3 towers as shown... but fill in the center with indoor parks. Less wasted space / more joy and exposure to light / increased air quality.

Supervlieg
01-13-2004, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by minus
I don't understand why they went with such a flexing design. I mean.. your first implementation of a huge project like this I don't think it warrents having a suspended Stadium... with a huge suspended centerpiece. I say they make it largly 3 towers as shown... but fill in the center with indoor parks. Less wasted space / more joy and exposure to light / increased air quality.

If they fill the center spaces with parks etc, the lower levels around the center aren't going to get a lot of light.

slaughters
01-13-2004, 12:13 PM
Cool,

Finally ! A city building design that looks like an offshore oil rig !

Question1 : What about earthquakes/planes/terrorists ?

Question2 : What happens when the power fails in the summer ?

Question3 : What happens when people refuse to live in it? They lower the price until people do move in and then you have the same class of people you find in the USA's highrise public housing buildings.

Question4 : Where will the homeless live? Under the megaplex in permanently shadowed alleys and rubble strewn streets?

Neil
01-13-2004, 12:40 PM
I was thinking earthquakes too. So insteads of hundres of people dieing, thousands and thousands will. In movies they never bother showing anything like that. They should go with pyramids, much more sturdy.

staticneuron
01-13-2004, 03:13 PM
We know how To build pyramids? I thought that was a structural mystery?

PhilOsirus
01-13-2004, 04:05 PM
Except if you saw the actual documentary you'd see how they can evacuate it quickly, among other things. It's not just a fancy drawing, there's much more to it.

boboroshi
01-13-2004, 04:52 PM
You have a good poitn with people refusing to live in it. Le Corbusier's radiant city (which would have leveled a large part of the nice, classical Paris) was attempted somwhere in the UK I believe. It was miserable. People hated living in the towers, and they became housing projects of a sort.

I think it's more so just GOOD urban development and conservation of non-urban space that is so severely lacking in the United States that it makes me sick. People spend far too much time in their cars because they can't walk anywhere. Since people don't walk, they get fatter or drive to a gym, yet another monument in a parking lot.

The thing I loved about living in London and Rome was that i could walk to anything almost. In old Rome, I had every service i needed in close proximity and public transportation was close by as well. In London it was a little less (but we were also up near the British Musesum). But it was easier than running around like I do in DC just to get to a supermarket (in a parking lot) or to the office (in a downtown area) or back to the apartment tower (surrounded by a parking lot).

It's the auto industry keeping us down ;)

mattregnier
01-13-2004, 06:10 PM
It's the auto industry keeping us down

Yeah no joke, where's my hoverboard, hovercar, and flashy reflective self drying jacket that marty mcfly and doc brown promised me already???

quid
01-13-2004, 08:57 PM
Yes urban layout is all about cars in the US. I didn't like that aspect much when I lived there. Europe is in general more people friendly given most of the city layouts were done before cars were invented. Old Latin American cities are nice in this regard too.

Has anyone read 2010 by Arthur C. Clark? Or at least I think it was that one… it was one of the space odyssey ones… any how he comes up with this neat idea that if we build building tall enough we can have its upper levels escape earth’s gravity. So we could take an elevator quite literally to space. They should skip the stadium and aim for the sky instead.

slaughters
01-13-2004, 09:24 PM
Originally posted by quid
Has anyone read 2010 by Arthur C. Clark? Or at least I think it was that one… it was one of the space odyssey ones… any how he comes up with this neat idea that if we build building tall enough we can have its upper levels escape earth’s gravity. So we could take an elevator quite literally to space. They should skip the stadium and aim for the sky instead. You must be talking about Sky Hooks, Beanstalks, and Space Elevators.

More info about them here:
http://flightprojects.msfc.nasa.gov/fd02_elev.html

Here is a PDF write up about Space Elevator Technology by a

David Smitherman
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
Advanced Projects Office
Flight Projects Directorate
Huntsville, Alabama

http://std.msfc.nasa.gov/ast/presentations/6b_smith.pdf

quid
01-14-2004, 05:58 AM
Yeah that's it. Although I do think that Arthur Clark claims to be the one who thought of it though, as he does with the communication satellite as well. One of the interesting benefits of building such a tower would be that it can generate massive amounts of electricity just sitting still. The earth, being a basically a giant magnet, moving around in a huge magnetic field, the solar system, is a huge electric generator. Building a tower that would create a conductive link between earth and space would in effect close the switch on this generator and we’d have a whole lot of “free” electricity. The further the tower could reach into space and the greater the surface area of the top of it, the greater amount would be of electricity that would be generated. People have known about that one for about 100 years though. NASA a few years ago did an experiment that did something similar a few years ago when they sent up the space shuttle which then released a sphere tethered to the shuttle by a very long line into space. It generated a great deal of electricity before the line snapped and their project swung off into space.

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